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LibO

Escuelas Linux 5.2 Officially Released with LibreOffice 5.3.1 & Google Chrome 57

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LibO
Linux

Alejandro Diaz informs Softpedia today about the general availability of Escuelas Linux 5.2, the newest and most advanced version of his Bodhi/Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distribution designed for educational purposes.

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LibreOffice 5.3 – Freedom Meets Functionality

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Reviews

Freedom to create with code is not the same as the freedom to create a specific product. Sometimes the freedom offered in the open source community makes it easier for me to be more productive. Other times, not so much. The biggest excuses I have to grab one of my machines with a closed source operating system consists of the following photo editing (Adobe CC), video editing (Final Cut Pro), and Civilization IV. Yes, I’m still playing Civ IV. It’s my favorite. I don’t need to upgrade. I’d love to find a tutorial that worked to get it working under Neon, but sadly the community that would write such a post appears to have moved on.

I used to think that I couldn’t create documents under Linux but LibreOffice 5.3 has really been a game changer. Everyone else beat me to the flashy reviews, so this isn’t a review that exposes the new features. This is a commentary of my experience.

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LibreOffice 5.3 Office Suite Gets First Point Release with 100 Improvements

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Softpedia was informed today by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the first point release to the LibreOffice 5.3 open-source office suite for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows.

LibreOffice 5.3.1 comes one and a half months after the release of LibreOffice 5.3, a major branch that introduced exciting new features for users of the popular office suite. These include the experimental MUFFIN user interface with a Microsoft Office-like Ribbon UI, as well as the first source release of LibreOffice Online.

During these past six weeks, LibreOffice 5.3.1 received two Release Candidate (RC) development versions, which fix about 100 bugs and regressions that have been either discovered by the LibreOffice developers/contributors or reported by users from the previous version.

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Original: The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.3.1

LibreOffice 5.2.6 Office Suite Officially Released with over 60 Improvements

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LibO

Italo Vignoli from The Document Foundation (TDF) is informing Softpedia today, March 9, 2017, about the general and immediate availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite.

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Getting Started with LibreOffice 5.2 Official Guide Now Available for Download

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The Document Foundation’s Documentation Team was pleased to announce today, March 6, 2017, the general and immediate availability of an updated Getting Started with LibreOffice.

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Italian military share LibreOffice eLearning course

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LibO

Italy’s Ministry of Defence is sharing the eLearning course that it developed together with LibreItalia, the Italian promoters of LibreOffice. The course is made available via the LibreItalia website, and the source material is available on GitHub. The Ministry hopes that making it available will inspire others to modify and reuse the LibreOffice course.

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Stay with Free Software, City of Munich!

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GNU
LibO
Linux
Microsoft

The city of Munich is currently considering a move away from Free Software back to Microsoft products. We consider this to be a mistake and urge the decision makers to reconsider.

For many years now the City of Munich has been using a mix of software by KDE, LibreOffice and Ubuntu, among others. Mayor Dieter Reiter (a self-proclaimed Microsoft-fan who helped Microsoft move offices to Munich) asked Accenture (a Microsoft partner) to produce a report about the situation of the City of Munich's IT infrastructure. That resulted in a 450-page document. This report is now being misused to push for a move away from Free Software. However the main issues listed in the report were identified to be organizational ones and not related to Free Software operating systems and applications.

[...]

The City of Munich has always been a poster child of Free Software in public administrations. It is a showcase of what can be done with Free Software in this setting. The step back by the City of Munich from Free Software would therefore not just be a blow for this particular deployment but also have more far-reaching effects into other similar deployments.

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Statement by The Document Foundation about the upcoming discussion at the City of Munich to step back to Windows and MS Office

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GNU
LibO
Linux
  • Statement by The Document Foundation about the upcoming discussion at the City of Munich to step back to Windows and MS Office

    The Document Foundation is an independent, charitable entity and the home of LibreOffice. We have followed the developments in Munich with great concerns and like to express our disappointment to see a minority of politicians apparently ignoring the expert advice for which they’ve sought.

    Rumours of the City of Munich returning to Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office have been regularly leaking since the election of Mayor Dieter Reiter, who was described as a “Microsoft fan” when interviewed by StadtBild magazine in 2014.

    [...]

    In spite of the suggestions, on Wednesday, February 15, Munich City Council will discuss a proposal – filed by a minority of city councillors – to install Windows 10 and MS Office 2016 on all workstations by 2020. This would cost taxpayers close to 90 million euro over the next six years, with a 35% aggravation over the 66 million euro figure suggested by Accenture.

    [...]

    Based on the above considerations, The Document Foundation thinks that the proposal to be discussed on Wednesday, February 15, represents a significant step backwards for the City of Munich, with a substantial increase in expenditure, an unknown amount of hidden cost related to interoperability, and a questionable usage of taxpayers money.

  • TDF On Munich

    Beware politicians promising solutions to nonexistent problems. Read TDF’s post. Read the report from Accenture, M$’s “partner”. Even Accenture doesn’t believe the politicians’ solution. Monopoly is never the solution to diverse problems. Accenture advocates using web-applications. That provides independence from the OS and GNU/Linux would work for them. Sigh. Politics, the game that never ends.

LibreOffice 5.3

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LibO
  • Experimenting with LibreOffice 5.3

    I finally installed LibreOffice 5.3 to try it out. (This is actually version 5.3.0.3.) This version comes with a new interface called MUFFIN, which I wrote about as LibreOffice updating its user interface.

  • LibreOffice 5.3: A week in stats

    We announced LibreOffice 5.3 one week ago, and a lot has happened in the meantime! Here’s a summary of downloads, web page views, social media activity and other statistics. We’ve also compared these to the LibreOffice 5.2 first week stats to see how the project and community is progressing…

Escuelas Linux 5.1 Officially Released with LibreOffice 5.3 and Vivaldi Browser

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LibO
Linux

The development team behind the Escuelas Linux operating system informed Softpedia today about the immediate availability of the Escuelas Linux 5.1 release, a major milestone that adds numerous improvements and new components.

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Today in Techrights

Leftovers: OSS

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    Open-source code platforms — in part, because they’re often free — have long been a popular choice for digital service creation and maintenance. In recent years, however, some agencies have turned to low-code solutions for intuitive visual features such as drag-and-drop design functionality. As Forrester Research notes, low-code platforms are "application platforms that accelerate app delivery by dramatically reducing the amount of hand-coding required."
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  • Democratizing IoT design with open source development boards and communities
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Software and today's howtos

Security and Bugs

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    Devops isn’t simply transforming how developers and operations work together to deliver better software faster, it is also changing how developers view application security. A recent survey from software automation and security company Sonatype found that devops teams are increasingly adopting security automation to create better and safer software.
  • This Xfce Bug Is Wrecking Users’ Monitors
    The Xfce desktop environment for Linux may be fast and flexible — but it’s currently affected by a very serious flaw. Users of this lightweight alternative to GNOME and KDE have reported that the choice of default wallpaper in Xfce is causing damaging to laptop displays and LCD monitors. And there’s damning photographic evidence to back the claims up.