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LibO

More on Canonical in the Document Foundation

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LibO
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Takes a Seat On The Document Foundation’s Advisory Board
  • The Document Foundation welcomes Canonical to the project Advisory Board
  • Canonical Joins The Document Foundation Advisory Board

    The Document Foundation today announced that Ubuntu parent company Canonical has joined The Document Foundation Advisory Board. The foundation said Canonical is to provide "experience and insights" to increase the use of LibreOffice in the enterprise and government. Canonical joins the likes of KDE, GNOME, Red Hat, SUSE, and Google on the board.

    The board's main purpose is to represent the foundation's sponsors and their needs to the Board of Directors, although the BoD isn't under obligation to accept or act on any proposals made by the advisory board. The BoD does, on occasion, solicit advice and guidance from the advisory board and the advisory board does make proposals on behalf of their members. Some of the other members on the Advisory Board include those listed above as well as the Free Software Foundation, Collabora, Intel, the French government, CloudOn, City of Munich government, and AMD.

Canonical Joins The Document Foundation's LibreOffice Project Advisory Board

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LibO
Ubuntu

Today, July 26, 2016, Canonical and The Document Foundation (TDF) announced that the company behind the popular Ubuntu operating system had joined the LibreOffice project Advisory Board.

If you're using the Ubuntu Linux OS on your personal computer, you are aware of the fact that the award-winning LibreOffice office suite is installed by default. Canonical chose to use LibreOffice as the default office suite for its widely-used GNU/Linux operating system since the first release of the open-source software in early 2011.

Now that Canonical announced the availability of Snaps as universal binary packages for Ubuntu and other supported GNU/Linux distributions, many application developers decided to offer their software in the Snap package format, and it looks like The Document Foundation is among the first to adopt the latest Snappy technologies for LibreOffice.

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LibreOffice News

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LibO
  • LIBOCon: get around Brno

    Yesterday I added Get around Brno page to the LibreOffice Conference website. There you can find comprehensive information about public transport in Brno, how to buy tickets, how to get to the hotel/venue if you arrive by train/bus/car/plane etc. All accompanied with maps and pictures of described places. So hopefully no one will get lost on their way to the hotel or venue, or struggle purchasing tickets.

  • LibreOffice developer interview: Winfried Donkers

    In this week’s developer interview, we talk to Winfried Donkers, a Dutch coder who has been using LibreOffice (and its predecessors) for almost two decades, and today works on Calc.

LibreOffice News

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LibO

From Microsoft to LibreOffice: How Italy's military is starting its march to open source

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LibO
Microsoft

In the past few years a growing number of Italian public bodies have chosen to ditch proprietary software for open source.

But most of these decisions have been taken at the local level, while in general the country's central government has seemed more reluctant to follow the open-source path.

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Giving Linux and LibreOffice a Try for Your Home Office

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux

Running your home office on a tight budget? There's a way to get all of your software—operating system (OS), productivity suite, scores of applications—completely free. It'll cost you, but not in the way you might think.

This life-changing alternative is Linux, which gives you more flexibility, more have-it-your-way customization, and more control than Windows or OS X users could ever dream of. I caution that it'll cost you because it's decidedly not for everyone. While it's far friendlier today than it was a year or even six months ago, Linux still requires you to invest, nay, enjoy some time spent setting up and tinkering with your PC.

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Also: New LibreOffice Vulnerability Patched in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Debian and Arch Linux

LibreOffice 5.1.4 Office Suite Now Available for Download with over 130 Bugfixes

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LibO

Today, June 23, 2016, The Document Foundation's Italo Vignoli has been happy to inform Softpedia about the immediate availability for download of the LibreOffice 5.1.4 "Fresh" open-source office suite.

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Also: LibreOffice Online Is Now Ready for ownCloud Enterprise, Thanks to Collabora

LibreOffice News

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LibO
  • Faster Rendering Appears To Be Coming For LibreOffice

    Some rendering speed improvements have been worked on recently for the LibreOffice open-source office suite and are now present in LO Git.

  • Document Liberation Project: progress so far in 2016

    If you haven’t heard of the Document Liberation Project (DLP) before, we made a short video explaining what it does and why it’s important. In summary: it supports development of software libraries to read documents from many (usually proprietary) applications. If you’ve ever opened a file generated by Apple Pages, WordPerfect or Microsoft Works in LibreOffice, you’ve benefitted from the hard work of the DLP team. And DLP libraries are used in many other prominent FOSS tools such as Inkscape and Scribus as well.

LibreOffice 5.2 Beta 2 Now Available as a Snap for Ubuntu Linux, Other Distros

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LibO

GNU/Linux developer Björn Michaelsen reported on June 14, 2016, managing to package the latest Beta build of the upcoming LibreOffice 5.2 office suite as a Snap package for various GNU/Linux distributions, including Ubuntu.

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LibreOffice 5.2 Beta Now Available as a Flatpak for Common Linux Distributions

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LibO

The upcoming LibreOffice 5.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite has entered Beta stages of development, and a first Beta release is now available for download on supported platforms.

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Also: LibreOffice Is Now One Of The First Major Linux Desktop Apps With A Flatpak

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS Events: LCA and systemd.conf

  • 5 great linux.conf.au talks (that aren't about Linux)
    linux.conf.au, otherwise known as LCA, is one of the world's longest-running open source events. LCA has been held in a different city around Australia and New Zealand almost every year since 1999. Despite the name, linux.conf.au is a generalist open source conference. LCA hasn't been just about Linux for a long time. Rather, the conference focuses on everything to do with open source: the software, hardware, and network protocols that underly it. LCA also has a strong track on free and open culture, exploring how open source interacts with science, government, and the law.
  • FINAL REMINDER! systemd.conf 2016 CfP Ends on Monday!
    Please note that the systemd.conf 2016 Call for Participation ends on Monday, on Aug. 1st! Please send in your talk proposal by then! We’ve already got a good number of excellent submissions, but we are very interested in yours, too!

OSS Leftovers

Programming

Security News

  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • Please save GMane!
  • The End of Gmane?
    In 2002, I grew annoyed with not finding the obscure technical information I was looking for, so I started Gmane, the mailing list archive. All technical discussion took place on mailing lists those days, and archiving those were, at best, spotty and with horrible web interfaces. The past few weeks, the Gmane machines (and more importantly, the company I work for, who are graciously hosting the servers) have been the target of a number of distributed denial of service attacks. Our upstream have been good about helping us filter out the DDoS traffic, but it’s meant serious downtime where we’ve been completely off the Internet.
  • Pwnie Express makes IoT, Android security arsenal open source
    Pwnie Express has given the keys to software used to secure the Internet of Things (IoT) and Android software to the open-source community. The Internet of Things (IoT), the emergence of devices ranging from lighting to fridges and embedded systems which are connected to the web, has paved an avenue for cyberattackers to exploit.
  • The Software Supply Chain Is Bedeviled by Bad Open-Source Code [Ed: again, trace this back to FUD firms like Sonatype in this case]
    Open-source components play a key role in the software supply chain. By reducing the amount of code that development organizations need to write, open source enables companies to deliver software more efficiently — but not without significant risks, including defective and outdated components and security vulnerabilities.
  • Securing a Virtual World [Ed: paywall, undated (no year but reposted)]
  • Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies
    In a blog post, Jeff Vander Stoep of the mobile operating system's security team said that in the next build of the OS, named Nougat, Google is going to be addressing two key areas of the Linux kernel that reside at the heart of most of the world's smartphones: memory protection and reducing areas available for attack by hackers.