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LibO

Educational-Oriented Escuelas Linux 5.6 Distro Released with LibreOffice 6.0

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Linux

Based on the latest release of the Ubuntu-based and Enlightenment-focused Bodhi Linux operating system, Escuelas Linux 5.6 is powered by the Linux 4.14.13 kernel, which includes patches against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities, and comes with a bunch of up-to-date educational apps.

These include the OnlyOffice 4.8.6 office suite (only for the 64-bit edition), Vivaldi 1.13, Chromium 63, Google Chrome 63, and Mozilla Firefox 57 "Quantum" web browsers, Geogebra 5.0.414 geometry, algebra, statistics, and calculus app, latest Adobe Flash Player 28 plugin, and the upcoming LibreOffice 6.0 open-source office suite.

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Collabora's CODE 3.0 Adds Rich LibreOffice Editing Functionality to the Browser

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Collabora Productivity, through Michael Meeks, is proud to inform Softpedia today on the general availability of the Collabora Online Development Edition (CODE) 3.0 LibreOffice-based office suite.

Collabora Productivity driving force behind putting LibreOffice in the Cloud (LibreOffice Online), and they worked very hard during the past year to bring you CODE 3.0, which boasts, for the very first time, full-featured editing functionality from the desktop version of the LibreOffice open-source office suite to the browser.

Users will now be able to enjoy complex writer numbering or powerful spreadsheet filtering with the new CODE 3.0 release. More such complex UI functionality will be coming to future versions of Collabora Online, sharing the user experience with LibreOffice both online and on the desktop.

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LibreOffice 5.4.4

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The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.4.4, the fourth minor release of LibreOffice 5.4 family, one month before the major announcement of LibreOffice 6.0. Although it still represents the bleeding edge in term of features, conservative users and enterprises can start the update process from their current LibreOffice 5.3 implementation.

TDF suggests to conservative users and enterprises to deploy LibreOffice with the backing of certified developers, migrators and trainers (an updated list is available at https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/professional-support/). This is extremely important for the growth of the LibreOffice ecosystem.

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Also:

  • LibreOffice 5.4.4 Released with 83 Fixes, LibreOffice 5.3 Users Urged to Upgrade

    The Document Foundation announced on Wednesday the release and immediate availability for download of the fourth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.4 office suite series.

    LibreOffice 5.4.4 comes five weeks after the release of version 5.4.3 to brings a total of 83 improvements and bug fixes for various of the included components, such as Writer, Calc, Draw, Impress, Math, and Base. The complete changelogs are available here and here for those curious to know what exactly was changed, and The Document Foundation now recommends LibreOffice 5.3 users to upgrade.

  • KDE Calligra 3.1 Preparing For Release In Early 2018

6 LibreOffice Tips To Get More Out of It

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LibreOffice is an excellent office suite. These LibreOffice tips will enable you to use it more effectively.
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LibreOffice 6.0 Release Candidate Will Arrive Just in Time for Christmas Testing

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LibreOffice 6.0 just exited beta testing and the development cycle will continue this week with the first Release Candidate, which should be available to download by the end of the week as The Document Foundation plans a third bug hunting session just before the Christmas holidays, on December 22, 2017.

"On December 22 we will have an international Bug Hunting Session (BHS), testing the RC1 (first release candidate) of LibreOffice 6.0," writes Mike Saunders. "You can download, try out and test this RC1 version – and if you spot any bugs, let our QA (Quality Assurance) community know."

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Elementary LibreOffice

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Two months ago I start to finalize the existing Elementary icon theme for LibreOffice. It’s about 2.000 icons and now they are available in LibreOffice 6.0 beta. In addition all icons are available as svg file so it can be used and edit in an easy way.

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LibreOffice 6.0 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed, Along with KDE Apps 17.12

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A total of six snapshots have been released to the public this month, as OpenSuSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger announced this past weekend, and they brought lots of goodies, along with some of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software components. But first, there's been a bunch of more python2->python3 conversions lately that you should know about.

"For the ones that don’t know yet, the python2 -> python3 switches are especially of interest to SLE/Leap 15," said Dominique Leuenberger. "Minimizing the support surface for Python 2 in favor of Python 3 will lead to a much stronger, supportable product for the future. As Tumbleweed is the leading and trendsetting product, it is but natural that we get those changes as well."

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Office Suites: OffiDocs, SoftMaker, LibreOffice, WPS Office

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OOo
  • OffiDocs, the online Linux environment is a free cloud service to use desktop apps like LibreOffice and GIMP with a web browser

    OffiDocs offers you a complete service so you can work in the cloud with your Linux desktop apps. Thanks to this online platform, you can develop your projects from anywhere and at any time just using your Internet browser.

  • SoftMaker Office 2018 for Linux reaches beta stage

    The German software developer, SoftMaker, has announced the public beta release of its SoftMaker Office 2018 for Linux package. The Linux release comes hot on the heels of the Windows version of the suite which launch just a few weeks ago. Users can expect a re-designed interface which allows users to work with classic menus or ribbons. The company also touts seamless compatibility with Microsoft Office.

  • LibreOffice vs. WPS Office: Which Office Suite Should You Use on Linux

    LibreOffice and WPS Office are two common Microsoft Office alternatives for the Linux platform. There has been several debates as to which of these is the better alternative to Microsoft Office. The debates, surely, are not going to end anytime soon.

    There is no definitive answer here! The choice between the two is completely dependent on the user and the job at hand. LibreOffice and WPS Office both have their pros and cons. After sharing some pros and cons of each office suite, you will be better informed to make your choice should you get caught up in such a dilemma.

LibreOffice 6.0 Beta Is Available to Download, Final Release Coming January 2018

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That's right, LibreOffice 6.0 Beta is now available to download, and while it's been released mostly for those involved in the bug hunting sessions arranged by The Document Foundation to triagge and resolve as many issues as possible before the final release, it can also be installed by early adopters.

A second Beta release could arrive early next month if there's still some critical bugs present, but the development cycle will continue in the second half of December with the first Release Candidate (RC) milestone, followed by the second and third RCs in January 2018. The final LibreOffice 6.0 release is expected at the end of January 2018.

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LibreOffice 6.0 Beta to Arrive by Week's End for Second Bug Hunting Session

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Announced today by Mike Saunders, the event will be held for the first time on a Monday, on November 27, 2017, from 8 a.m. UTC to 10 p.m. UTC. During the event, which will take place online, LibreOffice developers will try to triage and fix as many bugs as possible for the first LibreOffice 6.0 Beta.

A few days before the event, The Document Foundation will release the LibreOffice 6.0 Beta 1 builds for GNU/Linux distributions using either the DEB or RPM binary formats, as well as for macOS and Microsoft Windows operating systems. These beta builds can run in parallel with the production version, LibreOffice 5.4.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Firefox 58.0, Paying it forward, Firefox Nightly, Lantea Maps

  • Firefox 58.0 “Quantum” Arrives With Faster Page Load Speeds And Code Compilation
    In November 2017, Mozilla launched its Firefox 57 web browser that was also called Firefox Quantum. It was hailed as a strong competitor to powerful Chrome web browser and we conducted a comparison of both browsers to give you a better idea. But, the story doesn’t end here; Mozilla is continuing to improve its work to deliver better performance with each release.
  • Paying it forward at Global Diversity CFP Day
    A CFP is a “Call for Papers” or “Call for Proposals” – many technical and academic conferences discover and vet speakers and their talk topics through an open, deadline-driven, online proposal submission process. This CFP process provides a chance for anyone to pitch a talk and pitch themselves as the presenter. Submitting a CFP, and having your proposal accepted, is one great way to get a foot in the door if you’re just getting started as a new speaker. And, for some developers, public speaking can be the door to many types of opportunity.
  • Firefox Nightly
    Creating a Gnome Dock launcher and a terminal command for Firefox Nightly About 18 months ago, Wil Clouser wrote a blog post on the very blog titled Getting Firefox Nightly to stick to Ubuntu’s Unity Dock. Fast forward to 2018, Ubuntu announced last year that it is giving up on their Unity desktop and will use Gnome Shell instead. Indeed, the last Ubuntu 17.10 release uses Gnome Shell by default. That means that the article above is slightly outdated now as its .desktop file was targeting the Unity environment which had its own quirks.
  • Lantea Maps Updates to Track Saving and Drawing
    After my last post on Lantea Maps (my web app to record GPS tracks), I started working on some improvements to its code. First, I created a new backend for storing GPS tracks on my servers and integrated it into the web app. You need to log in via my own OAuth2 server, and then you can upload tracks fairly seamlessly and nicely. The UI for uploading is now also fully integrated into the track "drawer" which should make uploading tracks a smoother experience than previously. And as a helpful feature for people who use Lantea Maps on multiple devices, a device name can be configured via the settings "drawer".

Red Hat and Fedora

Perl Advocacy

  • My DeLorean runs Perl
    My signature hobby project these days is a computerized instrument cluster for my car, which happens to be a DeLorean. But, whenever I show it to someone, I usually have to give them a while to marvel at the car before they even notice that there's a computer screen in the dashboard. There's a similar problem when I start describing the software; programmers immediately get hung up on "Why Perl???" when they learn that the real-time OpenGL rendering of instrument data is all coded in Perl. So, any discussion of my project usually starts with the history of the DeLorean or a discussion of the merits of Perl vs. other, more-likely tools.
  • An overview of the Perl 5 engine
    As I described in "My DeLorean runs Perl," switching to Perl has vastly improved my development speed and possibilities. Here I'll dive deeper into the design of Perl 5 to discuss aspects important to systems programming.

FOSS Linux App Development In Decline, Canonical Promotes Snap Using Proprietary Software

  • Is Native Linux App Development In Decline?
    A blog like mine thrives, in part, on there being a steady supply of good quality native Linux apps to write about. We do news too of course, and tutorials, how tos, lists, eye candy, and even the odd opinion piece (like this post). But I know you like reading about new and updated Linux apps, and, to be fair, I like writing about them. And yet… Where have all the Linux apps gone? Bear with me as what follows is more of a ramble than a coherent essay. For background, I’m writing this on day four of an enthusiasm drought.
  • Slack launches on Linux
  • Slack gets the Linux treatment: New snap available for Mint, Ubuntu, Debian, and more
    Slack is now available as a snap, which means Linux users can take advantage of the workplace collaboration platform, Canonical announced last week. Slack has recently debuted a number of features that make it more appealing to businesses, including Shared Channels and Private Shared Channels, which allow employees from different companies to work together on projects in private if they so choose. With more than 9 million weekly active users, Slack has gained a lot of traction in the enterprise, as noted by our sister site ZDNet. Back in October 2017, Linux overtook MacOS for the first time in terms of global operating system market share—which means the move opens up even more users to the Slack platform.
  • Canonical slaps Slack snap onto stack
    As the ‘company behind’ Ubuntu, Canonical has brought forward the first iteration of Slack as a snap on its software platform. Slack is a cloud-based set of proprietary team collaboration tools and services that go some way beyond core ‘messaging’ functionality into areas including project management.