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LibO

TDF announces LibreOffice 5.4.7

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LibO

The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.4.7, the last minor release of the LibreOffice 5.4 family, currently targeted at mainstream users and enterprises.

TDF suggests deploying LibreOffice in production environments with the backing of certified developers, migrators and trainers (an updated list is available at https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/professional-support/). This is extremely important for the growth of the LibreOffice ecosystem.

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LibreOffice 6.0.4

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LibO
  • The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.0.4

    The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 6.0.4, which represents the bleeding edge in terms of features, and as such is targeted at early adopters, tech-savvy and power users.

    For mainstream users and enterprise deployments, TDF provides the alternative download of LibreOffice 5.4.6.

  • LibreOffice 6.0.4 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows with 88 Bug Fixes

    The Document Foundation announced today the release and immediate availability for download of the fourth maintenance update to the latest stable LibreOffice 6.0 open-source office suite.

    LibreOffice 6.0.4 comes five weeks after version 6.0.3 to address a total of 88 bugs that affected various of the office suite's components, including Writer, Calc, Impress, Draw, Math, and others. Details about the changes implemented in this new release can be found here and here.

    However, the Document Foundation still recommends LibreOffice 6.0 only to early adopters, as well as power, tech-savvy users as it contains bleeding edge features that need more thorough testing before it can be validated for deployments in production environments, so version 6.0.4 is here to make the office suite more stable and reliable.

LibreOffice 6.1 Lands Mid August 2018, First Bug Hunting Session Starts April 27

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Work on the next big release of the widely-used open-source and cross-platform office suite for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems, LibreOffice 6.1, has already begun this week with a focus on revamping the online experience and improving the Writer and Calc components.

A first bug hunting session was scheduled for the end of next week, on April 27, 2018, when developers will hack on the first alpha milestone of LibreOffice 6.1, which should be available to download for all supported platforms a few days before the event. During the bug hunting session, devs will try to fix as many bugs as possible.

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Collabora Online 3.2 released

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LibO

Collabora Productivity, the driving force behind putting LibreOffice in the Cloud, is excited to announce a new release of its flagship enterprise-ready cloud document suite – Collabora Online 3.2, with new features and multiple improvements.

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The Best Free Office Suites for Linux in 2018

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LibO
OSS
OOo

FossMint is particular about FOSS and related projects or partnerships. Sadly, though, not all the applications that are vital to certain needs fall under that category. Maybe someday they will but until then, potential users deserve the right to know about all their alternatives.

All the listed software are free to use with similar features to the ones in Microsoft’s Office Suite and even documents that are compatible with the same.

Some are desktop software while others are browser-based so you have the option to choose which one better suits your setup.

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Changes Begin Building Up For LibreOffice 6.1

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LibO

LibreOffice 6.0 was released at the end of January while already is a fair amount of new features over the past two months that have started up building for the next release of this open-source office suite, LibreOffice 6.1.

LibreOffice 6.1 is expected to be released by mid-August while for that to happen an alpha release is slated for the end of April, a beta at the end of May, and the release candidates beginning in early July.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Latest Linux 4.15.7 Kernel and LibreOffice 6.0.2

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LibO
SUSE

On the first day of the month, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed received the KDE Plasma 5.12.2 LTS desktop environment, Gawk 4.2.1, GNU C Library (Glibc) 2.27, and GnuPG 2.2.5. The second day of March brought the latest Linux 4.15.7 kernel to Tumbleweed users, along with the OpenJDK 1.8.0.161 security patch.

"openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed has had five snapshots so far this month and a lot of those snapshots have includes several GNU packages," said Douglas DeMaio. "There were many other packages and the first snapshot of the month included an update for KDE Plasma."

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Oracle's Brand War (Java) and LibreOffice

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Development
LibO
  • Java EE renamed 'Jakarta EE' after Big Red brand spat

    The open source version of Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) has been renamed Jakarta EE to satisfy Oracle's desire to control the "Java" brand.

    The renaming became necessary after Oracle moved Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, a shift it hoped would see developers become more engaged with the project.

  • Good-bye JEE, hello Jakarta EE

    Remember when Oracle bought Sun? The one thing that seemed to make sense about this deal was Oracle's acquisition of Java. Almost 10 years later, Oracle gave up on Java Enterprise Edition (JEE), aka J2EE, and started spinning Java's still-popular enterprise middleware platform to the Eclipse Foundation. Now, under the aegis of the Eclipse Foundation, JEE has been renamed to Jakarta EE.

    Why? Because Oracle was never successful in monetizing Java. In large part, this was because of Sun and then Oracle's failed attempts to steer the Java Community.

    As Oracle's server-side Java evangelist, David Delabassee, admitted in August 2017: "We believe that moving Java EE technologies including reference implementations and test compatibility kit to an open source foundation may be the right next step, in order to adopt more agile processes, implement more flexible licensing, and change the governance process." 

    [...]

    If Jakarta sounds familiar, it's because it is not the first time that name has been applied to a JEE server. From 1999 to 2011, the Apache Software Foundation ran Apache Jakarta, which covered all of Apache's open-source Java efforts.

  • LibreOffice Will (Finally) Use Native GTK Dialogs on Linux

    The next major release of LibreOffice will use native GTK3 dialogs on Linux desktops. 

    “Wait —LibreOffice doesn’t already use GTK dialogs?!” you might be asking. It was certainly my own first reaction when I opened an e-mail about the news in our tip inbox this morning (btw – thanks Dee!)

    Admittedly I do not use LibreOffice properly. Like, at all. Nothing against the suite itself — it’s rather marvellous — it’s just that the only writing I tend to do takes place inside a WordPress editor.

Collabora Online 3.1, TDF Chairwoman and Deputy Chairman announced

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LibO
  • Collabora Online 3.1

    Collabora Productivity, the driving force behind putting LibreOffice in the Cloud, is proud to announce a new release of its flagship enterprise-ready cloud document suite – Collabora Online 3.1, including new features and improvements. This is the first release after the major Collabora Online 3.0 release a few weeks ag

  • TDF Chairwoman and Deputy Chairman announced

    The Board of Directors of The Document Foundation has confirmed Marina Latini in the role of Chairwoman and appointed Bjoern Michaelsen in the role of Deputy Chairman.

    I have used their own words – from the email they have sent to present their candidacy – to describe themselves, although they are both very well know both in the LibreOffice community and in the wider FOSS community.

LibreOffice 6.0 - Goodness, Gracious, Great Fonts of Fire!

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Reviews

LibreOffice 6.0 is a phenomenal release. Pro-am if you will. The very first version that can proudly wear its laurels. It's almost a completely different product. More elegant, more efficient, with better and smarter layout and work logic, improved functionality with pretty much everything. Most importantly, Microsoft Office supports is very good. It was also stable and fast.

Technically, LibreOffice is playing catchup with Microsoft Office. We probably may never achieve parity, as office suites take millions of dollars to develop and maintain. But still, in this game of hare and armadillo, the open-source beastling is making great strides forward. LibreOffice 6.0 has an expensive, elegant, refreshing feel to it. An office suite reborn. Official release notes are often three quarters hyperbole and one quarter nonsense, but in this case, it's all awesome stuff. I am extremely happy, and I urge you to install and test LibreOffice 6.0. There are few free products that warrant this much joy. 10/10. Font away.

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More in Tux Machines

Doxyqml 0.4.0

After almost two years, here comes a new version of Doxyqml, the QML filter for Doxygen. This new version adds a new command-line option: --namespace to wrap the generated C++ in a namespace, and makes the parser more robust. Nothing ground-breaking, but some nice changes nevertheless. What's interesting with this project is that I don't use it these days, but it still receives contributions from time to time. This puts me in the unusual position (for me) where most of my contributions to the project are reviewing code, cleaning things, a bit of infrastructure (I just added code coverage checks: 88%, not too bad) and release management. Surprisingly, I like doing this, I am happy to see this little tool remains useful enough that others keep it alive. Read more

Plasma 5.12.5, Applications 18.04.1 and Frameworks 5.46.0 by KDE now available in Chakra

On your next system upgrade you will receive all the latest versions of KDE’s Plasma, Applications and Frameworks, in addition to several other package updates. For more details and the full changelogs on KDE’s software releases, you can read the official announcements: Plasma 5.12.5 Applications 18.04.1 Frameworks 5.46.0 Other noteworthy package updates include wine 3.8, skypeforlinux 8.20.0.9 and pypy 6.0.0. Read more

SMTube review - Your train to Youtube

It's a no brainer. On the desktop, you go online, and you open a tab and you load Youtube, and then you play clips. But then, on mobile devices, you have dedicated applications, which usually offer a somewhat more efficient media experience. So, on the desktop, it's the browser way or the ... SMTube way? SMTube is a cross-platform Youtube player, which allows you to search and play videos from the popular media platform, with some additional search tweaks and filters, and extra download options, all this from the desktop, without having to keep a browser tab open. It's a convenient tool to use, and with the recent rewrite, it actually works, and it works fairly well. I decided to test to see what gives. [...] SMTube looks like a nice tool. It is not strictly necessary or needed, but it does allow you to have Youtube open and playing, even if you're not currently using your browser, i.e. you can use it like any other media player. This is nice, plus you get a clean and intuitive interface, decent search and filter options, and it's easy to change settings and configure additional players. You also have the option to download clips. I don't know where SMTube stands when it comes to Google, Youtube, but ordinary users will surely appreciate the extra flexibility they get with a media player rather than just a browser tab. Of course, you're not signed in, you don't get recommendations, comments or playlists, and such, so I guess there are benefits to going directly to Youtube. But if you're only after what Youtube can play without any socializing, SMTube is an excellent choice. It's had a rough ride, it never quite fully worked for me in my various distro reviews, but this new version is stable, robust and works well. At the very least, it's worth testing. Choo choo. Read more

GNOME Development/Developers

  • Nautilus Ability To Launch Binaries Or Scripts To Be Reverted, Might Be Implemented Differently
    It looks like the decision to remove the ability to run binaries and scripts from Nautilus file manager will be reverted. The change comes after some use cases appeared that the developers agreed they need to support, "especially for enterprise and content creators". One such use case that was mentioned as a reason for reverting this is a small "if then that" script for building HTML and PDF files, which uses Zenity to display a dialog, as well as notifications to display the progress. I find the use case being used as an example a bit weird because that's certainly not something common, like a self-extracting game script for instance.
  • Stickers in Riot
    The matrix.org protocol is flexible so this is a good example of how to add new features to the clients that uses matrix without the need to change the protocol. This is not a core feature because you can send images, but I think this is great and add a simple way to show reactions for the users, so as I was reading I thought that we can add this to Fractal, so I started to read how we can add support for this.
  • Talking at GPN 2018 in Karlsruhe, Germany
    Similar to last year I managed to attend the Gulasch Programmier-Nacht (GPN) in Karlsruhe, Germany. Not only did I attend, I also managed to squeeze in a talk about PrivacyScore. We got the prime time slot on the opening day along with all the other relevant talks, including the Eurovision Song Contest, so we were not overly surprised that the audience had a hard time deciding where to go and eventually decided to attend talks which were not recorded. Our talk was recorded and is available here.