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LibO

LibreOffice: A history of document freedom

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LibO

My reminiscing led me to reach out to the Document Foundation, which governs LibreOffice, to learn more about the history of this open source productivity software.

The Document Foundation's team told me that "StarWriter, the ancestor of the LibreOffice suite, was developed as proprietary software by Marco Börries, a German student, to write his high school final thesis." He formed a company called Star Division to develop the software.

In 1999, Sun Microsystems bought Star Division for $73.5 million, changed the software's name to OpenOffice.org, and released the code as open source. Anyone could download the office suite at no charge for personal use. The Document Foundation told me, "For almost 10 years, the software was developed under Sun stewardship, from version 1.0 to version 3.2. It started with a dual license—LGPL and the proprietary SISSL (Sun Industry Standard Software License)—but it evolved to pure LGPL from version 2.0."

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LibreOffice 6.1 Gets First Point Release with More Than 120 Bug Fixes

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Security

Coming more than a month after the launch of the major LibreOffice 6.1 series, which introduced a revamped and much faster image handling feature, a new Page menu and reorganized Draw menus, a new icon theme for Windows users, new Online Help pages, and a much-improved LibreOffice Online, LibreOffice 6.1.1 adds more than 120 bug and regression fixes.

"LibreOffice 6.1.1 represents the bleeding edge in term of features for open source office suites, and as such is targeted at technology enthusiasts, early adopters and power users," said The Document Foundation. "For any enterprise class deployment, TDF maintains the more mature LibreOffice 6.0.6, which should be sourced from a company providing a Long Term Supported version of the suite."

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New LibreOffice Version Offers Fresh Take

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LibO

Potential LibreOffice adopters should consider possible downsides, urged king. With more than two decades into the "revolution" sparked by Linux and open source solutions, LibreOffice still constitutes a small fraction of the productivity applications and tools market.

Would that be the case if these offerings really were superior? Adopting any new platform requires retraining, and that includes LibreOffice, he said. Most employees arrive knowing at least the rudiments of Word and other Microsoft apps.

Plus, to its credit, Microsoft has addressed many user complaints and Office 365 makes it cheaper and easier to use the company's solutions than ever before, added King.

"So companies have to sort out why they are considering LibreOffice," he suggested, to determine "what potential benefits are actually achievable and whether leaving behind a longtime market leading solution (Office) really makes sense."

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LibreOffice 6.1

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LibO
  • The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.1, a major release which shows the power of a large and diverse community of contributors

    LibreOffice 6.1’s new features have been developed by a large community of code contributors: 72% of commits are from developers employed by companies sitting in the Advisory Board like Collabora, Red Hat and CIB and by other contributors such as SIL and Pardus, and 28% are from individual volunteers.

    In addition, there is a global community of individual volunteers taking care of other fundamental activities such as quality assurance, software localization, user interface design and user experience, editing of help system text and documentation, plus free software and open document standards advocacy at a local level.

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Shipping Today As A Big Update For This Open-Source Office Suite

    LibreOffice 6.1 will officially be hitting the web in a short time as the latest major feature release to this newest cross-platform, open-source office suite.

    Since LibreOffice 6.0 shipped in January, many improvements have went into making LibreOffice 6.1 an even greater release. Found with LibreOffice 6.1 is better KDE integration as well as continued GTK3/GNOME improvements, Microsoft file importing enhancements for Excel and other Microsoft Office products, improved image handling, a new database engine, various enhancements for Libreoffice Online, better EPUB exporting, support for parallel formula evaluation on the CPU, other speed optimizations like greater VLOOKUP performance for Calc, various localization work, and more.

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Open-Source Office Suite Officially Released, Here's What's New

    The Document Foundation announced today the official release and general availability for download of the LibreOffice 6.1 open-source office suite, the second major update of the LibreOffice 6 series introduced in early 2018, for all supported platforms.

    LibreOffice 6.1 has been in development for the past six months and it's not ready to conquer your Linux, Mac, or Windows office workstations with new features like revamped image handling functionality that's significantly faster and smoother, especially when opening documents created in Microsoft Office.

    LibreOffice 6.1 also adds a new Page menu and re-organizes the menus of the Draw component for better consistency across the different modules, improves the EPUB export filter with additional options for customizing metadata and better support for links, images, tables, footnotes, and embedded fonts.

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Released With New Colibre Icon Theme, Native Gtk3 Dialogs, Improved EPUB Export

    The Document Foundation announced LibreOffice 6.1 today, a release which includes a new icon theme called Colibre, native Gtk3 dialogs (if the Gtk3 backend is used), faster image handling, improved EPUB export, and more.

    The free and open source office suite LibreOffice 6.1 includes a new icon theme, called Colibre, with this release. The icon theme is based on Microsoft's icon design guidelines, and its purpose is to make the application more visually appealing to users coming from the Windows environment. Calibre is set as the default icon theme on Windows.

LibreOffice 6.0.6 Office Suite Released with 55 Bug Fixes, Download Now

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LibO
Security

Coming about six weeks after the LibreOffice 6.0.5 maintenance update, the LibreOffice 6.0.6 point release is here to further improve and stability and reliability of the LibreOffice 6.0 office suite series for all supported platforms by addressing a total of 55 bugs and other issues reported by users lately for various core components. Detailed changelogs are available here and here.

When they released the LibreOffice 6.0.5 update back in June 2018, The Document Foundation said that the LibreOffice 6.0 series is now ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. LibreOffice 6.0.6 continues this trend by offering mainstream users a more stable, reliable, and secure office suite that's ready to replace popular commercial alternatives.

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How LibreOffice’s quality has improved thanks to automated tools and the volunteer contribution of security specialists

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LibO

The Document Foundation celebrates five years of improvements to LibreOffice’s source code under Red Hat’s leadership, thanks to the adoption of automated tools such as Coverity Scan and Google OSS-Fuzz, and to the key contributions in the area of source code fuzzing of security specialists such as Antti Levomäki and Christian Jalio of Forcepoint.

“The combination of Coverity Scan, Google OSS-Fuzz and dedicated fuzzing by security specialists at Forcepoint has allowed us to catch bugs – which could have turned into security issues – before a release,” says Red Hat’s Caolán McNamara, a senior developer and the leader of the security team at LibreOffice.

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Oracle/Kernel/LibreOffice: DTrace, Linux, and LibreOffice 6.1 Schedule

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LibO
  • DTrace on Linux: an Update

    DTrace offers easy-but-powerful dynamic tracing of system behavior, and it is so lightweight and safe that it can routinely be used on production systems. DTrace was originally developed for the Oracle Solaris operating system.

  • Oracle Updates DTrace For Linux With ARM64 Support, Feature Updates

    At the beginning of the year Oracle reaffirmed their commitment for DTrace on Linux. For those still interested in using this dynamic tracing framework on Linux, Oracle has been rolling out a number of feature updates.

    Oracle has made a number of recent updates to the DTrace framework on Linux. Recent DTrace for Linux improvements include support for 64-bit ARM (ARM64 / AArch64), support for additional providers, bringing feature alignment with other DTrace implementations, compile-time array bounds checking, support for newer versions of the Linux kernel, PID provider support for user-space tracing, and various bug fixes.

  • LibreOffice 6.1 RC2 Released For Testing This Next Open-Source Office Suite Update

    LibreOffice 6.1 is planned for release by the middle of August but for that next version to happen without a hitch, the LibreOffice team could use a hand with the testing of their latest release candidates.

LibreOffice 6.1 On Track for Mid-August Release as Second RC Is Out for Testing

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LibO

Coming only two weeks after the first Release Candidate, LibreOffice 6.1 RC2 (Release Candidate 2) is here to fix more of those annoyances and bugs that might block the final release. A total of 84 bugs have been squashed across various components in LibreOffice 6.1 RC2 compared to the first Release Candidate.

While LibreOffice 6.1 is on track for its mid-August release, the development team still needs your help to test these Release Candidate versions and report any bugs or issues you may encounter, or just give positive feedback if everything works well for you during testing.

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LibreOffice With Microsoft DRM and a Tax

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LibO
Microsoft
Legal

LibreOffice and Plasma

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KDE
LibO

At KDAB, we know that consistency is an important aspect of the User Experience – users don’t want to have to learn different ways to achieve the same thing. In the Linux world, there is a major structural pitfall to this: the applications written for Linux come in at least two major technologies – Qt and GTK. Each of these frameworks deeply influences the experience the user has, and in different ways. As you’d expect, the frameworks have their own helper-dialogs e.g. to open or save a file or for printing. This can make it confusing for users, when the apps they use don’t show the same helper-dialogs for common actions.

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Mozilla: Privacy, R.I.P., and Consent Management at Mozfest 2018

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    Mozilla, the organisation that produces the Firefox browser and makes a loud noise about its open source credentials, is quietly collecting telemetry data on its users by the use of hidden add-ons, even though publicly visible telemetry controls are not selected.

  • R.I.P., Charles W. Moore, a fine man who liked fine Macs
    A farewell and au revoir to a great gentleman in making the most of your old Mac, Charles W. Moore, who passed away at his home in rural Canada on September 16 after a long illness. Mr Moore was an early fan of TenFourFox, even back in the old bad Firefox 4 beta days, and he really made his famous Pismo PowerBook G3 systems work hard for it.
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    Good news. It looks like we're having a consent management mini-conference as part of Mozfest next month. (I'm one of the organizers for the Global Consent Manager session, and plan to attend the others.)

Android Leftovers

LibreOffice: A history of document freedom

My reminiscing led me to reach out to the Document Foundation, which governs LibreOffice, to learn more about the history of this open source productivity software. The Document Foundation's team told me that "StarWriter, the ancestor of the LibreOffice suite, was developed as proprietary software by Marco Börries, a German student, to write his high school final thesis." He formed a company called Star Division to develop the software. In 1999, Sun Microsystems bought Star Division for $73.5 million, changed the software's name to OpenOffice.org, and released the code as open source. Anyone could download the office suite at no charge for personal use. The Document Foundation told me, "For almost 10 years, the software was developed under Sun stewardship, from version 1.0 to version 3.2. It started with a dual license—LGPL and the proprietary SISSL (Sun Industry Standard Software License)—but it evolved to pure LGPL from version 2.0." Read more

Learn the 37 most frequently used shortcuts in GIMP

GIMP is a fantastic artist's tool for editing digital images, especially with the bevy of impressive features in the recent release of version 2.10. Of course, like all creative applications, you can get working more quickly if you can make yourself familiar with the various keyboard shortcuts and hotkeys available. GIMP, of course, gives you the ability to customize these shortcuts to match what you're personally comfortable with. However, the default shortcuts that GIMP ships with are impressive and generally easy to get used to. This cheat sheet is not an exhaustive list of all of the defaults GIMP has available. Instead, it covers the most frequently used shortcuts so you can get to work as fast as possible. Plus, there should be a few in here that make you aware of a few features that maybe you weren't aware of. Read more