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LibO

Simon Phipps and the Document Foundation Against DRM

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  • DRM Is Toxic To Culture

    Travelling frequently in Europe, I’ve had the chance to use two approaches to the underground/metro/subway, the Paris Metro and the U-bahn in various German cities. There is a very visible difference between the two, at least in my experience. Here are some sample encounters.

    In Paris, I bought my Metro ticket and then used it in an automated barrier to reach the platform. I noticed lowlife furtively scanning the station and then vaulting the barriers, and I saw armed police at the station to catch the thieves doing this (they didn’t catch any that I saw, and there were several of each at each station).

    By contrast, the U-Bahn in Nürnberg had no barriers. I bought my ticket, boarded the train without fuss, there was no risk of being shot by a policeman targeting a barrier-vaulting cheat, and the system was still clean, efficient and well-used.

  • Day against DRM

    Sunday, July 9, is the Day against DRM. The Document Foundation supports the global campaign led by FSF, to raise the awareness of issues related to the so called Digital Rights Management software. As any other proprietary technology, DRM is killing user freedom of choice, and should always be avoided.

LibreOffice 5.3.4 immediately available for download

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The Document Foundation (TDF) announces the availability of LibreOffice 5.3.4, the fourth minor release of the LibreOffice 5.3 family, targeted at technology enthusiasts, early adopters and power users. LibreOffice 5.3.4 integrates over 100 patches, with a significant number of fixes for interoperability with Microsoft Office RTF and OOXML documents.

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Professional Typography in LibreOffice and Italian Migration

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  • LibreOffice: Professional Typography Fully Arrives

    Three decades ago, StarDivision, the ancestor of LibreOffice and OpenOffice, was designed as an intermediate desktop publisher. However, many LibreOffice improvements are designed for users who insist on using it like a typewriter and entering manual formatting. Unofficially, I have been told that LibreOffice developers feel that, since manual formatting is the way most people use it, development for people who want advanced typography is a low priority. Finally, however, in the 5.3 release, LibreOffice has given advanced users a major feature: the ability to add advanced features automatically — a feature that, after almost a century and a half, gives home typists the ability to do advanced typesetting.

    That sounds like an exaggeration, so let me explain. Typewriters were a major advance over handwriting, but still fell short of producing copy that was as polished as what a printing shop could do. To add bold on most typewriters, a typist had to backspace and type over the same letters again, often blurring the letters. Adding italics was even worse, because they could only be indicated by the old copy editing notation of underlining.

    Word processors were a significant improvement over typewriters, but still generally fall short of complete professionalism. For instance, Bold and italic were available with a few clicks. However, far too many word processors continue to manufacture their own small capitals, the letters used to improve the look of several upper case letters in a row — and, often, the result was hideous.

  • Locked in by choice: Why the Italian Defence Department is switching to open source office

    Italy’s Defence Department began migrating to open source software in September 2015. It aims to replace Microsoft Office on 100,000 desktops with LibreOffice by 2020.

    Geneal Camillo Sileo was the man behind the decision to switch to open source. LibreDifesa - the name of his digital migration project - is a success, he says.

    “We have conducted a study and we have concluded that Microsoft Office and Libre Office were just as good for our needs.”

    The advantage of open source is that the code can be tailored to the needs of each organisation. “There should be a willingness to move towards that.”

  • Locked in by choice: How European governments are handling their Microsoft addiction

    In 2012, the then European Union (EU) commissioner for digital agenda, Neelie Kroes, said that not only EU institutions, but all government bodies throughout Europe should implement open standards. Her policy was designed to free public bodies from dependence on proprietary software suppliers.

    The UK has made the biggest strides in encouraging large government departments to increase their use of open source software, through initiatives by the Government Digital Service (GDS). Although local authorities and the NHS are still heavily reliant on proprietary software, the message is gradually spreading to smaller government departments in Britain.

    But five years on, EU civil servants rely on Microsoft Office and Windows. As a result, the public sector is hooked on a digital dependence on Microsoft that costs billions of any currency. Experts say this inhibits innovation and raises technical, political and security risks.

LibreOffice 6.0 to Automatically Update Itself on GNU/Linux, but There's a Catch

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LibreOffice developer Markus Mohrhard recently announced that his work on the new automatic updater for the upcoming LibreOffice 6.0 office suite for Linux is finally ready to see the light of day.

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LibreOffice Features Survey

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  • Have You Taken the LibreOffice Features Survey?

    A new survey aims to help LibreOffice learn which features of the popular open-source office suite users use the most.

  • Survey on LibreOffice features

    Due to its long history, LibreOffice has accumulated a staggering amount of features. Maintaining these features is not free, and having a massive amount of features may blur the focus of the software. In order to steer the development and to focus on the more important aspects we prepared a survey that investigates how often some features are used.

Public sector benefits from LibreOffice bug hunting

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The software development community working on LibreOffice have greatly scaled up their bug-hunting efforts, using automated software test tools made available by Google. Beneficiaries include the many European public administrations that use up-to-date versions of this suite of office productivity tools.

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3 alternatives to LibreOffice Writer

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Even though I write for a living, I rarely use a word processor these days; I do most of my work in a text editor. When I do need to use a word processor, I turn to LibreOffice Writer. It's familiar, it's powerful, and it does everything that I need a word processor to do.

It's hard to dispute LibreOffice Writer's position at the top of the free and open source word processor food chain—both in popularity and in the number of features it has. That said, Writer isn't everyone's favorite word processor or their go-to application for writing.

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LibreOffice News

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  • LibreOffice leverages Google’s OSS-Fuzz to improve quality of office suite
  • LibreOffice leverages Google’s OSS-Fuzz to improve quality of office suite

    For the last five months, The Document Foundation has made use of OSS-Fuzz, Google’s effort to make open source software more secure and stable, to further improve the quality and reliability of LibreOffice’s source code. Developers have used the continuous and automated fuzzing process, which often catches issues just hours after they appear in the upstream code repository, to solve bugs – and potential security issues – before the next binary release.LibreOffice is the first free office suite in the marketplace to leverage Google’s OSS-Fuzz. The service, which is associated with other source code scanning tools such as Coverity, has been integrated into LibreOffice’s security processes – under Red Hat’s leadership – to significantly improve the quality of the source code.

  • Please participate in a survey about page margins

    Margins specify the amount of space to leave between the edges of the page and the document text. You can define it for the left/inner, right/outer, top and bottom side individually. Page margins are defined by default at 0.79″ respectively 2cm on each side in LibreOffice Writer (located under Format > Page). These default values are under close scrutiny now.

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.3.3

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The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.3.3, focused on bleeding edge features, and as such targeted at technology enthusiasts, early adopters, and power users. LibreOffice 5.3.3 integrates over 70 patches, with an update of the Sifr monochrome icon set and several fixes for interoperability with Microsoft Office documents.

For all other users and enterprise deployments, TDF suggests LibreOffice 5.2.7, with the backing of professional support by certified professionals

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LibreOffice 5.2.7 Is the Last in the Series, End of Life Set for June 4, 2017

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The Document Foundation announced a few moments ago the release of the seventh and last scheduled point release for the LibreOffice 5.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite.

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More in Tux Machines

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.51.0

KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement. This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner. Read more Also: KDE Frameworks 5.51 Released

Linux 4.19-rc8

As mentioned last week, here's a -rc8 release as it seems needed. There were a lot of "little" pull requests this week, semi-normal for this late in the cycle, but a lot of them were "fix up the previous fix I just sent" which implies that people are having a few issues still. I also know of at least one "bad" bug that finally has a proposed fix, so that should hopefully get merged this week. And there are some outstanding USB fixes I know of that have not yet landed in the tree (I blame me for that...) Anyway, the full shortlog is below, lots of tiny things all over the tree. Please go and test and ensure that all works well for you. Hopefully this should be the last -rc release. Read more Also: Linux 4.19-rc8 Released With A Lot Of "Tiny Things"

Kali Linux for Vagrant: Hands-on

I recently saw the announcement for Kali Linux on Vagrant. I have been a huge fan of Kali Linux for a very long time, and I am interested in virtualization (and currently using VirtualBox in an educational environment), so this was a very interesting combination to me. I have now installed it on a few of my systems, and so far I am quite impressed with it. The logical place to start is with a brief overview of Vagrant itself. What is Vagrant? According to their web page: Vagrant is a tool for building and managing virtual machine environments in a single workflow What Vagrant actually does is provide a way of automating the building of virtualized development environments using a variety of the most popular providers, such as VirtualBox, VMware, AWS and others. It not only handles the initial setup of the virtual machine, it can also provision the virtual machine based on your specifications, so it provides a consistent environment which can be shared and distributed to others. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Vulkan Cracks 2,500 Projects On GitHub
    After cracking 2,000 projects referencing Vulkan on GitHub earlier this year, this week it passed the milestone of having more than 2,500 projects. Granted, some of these projects referencing Vulkan are still in their primitive stages, but of the 2,500+ projects are a lot of interesting Vulkan-using projects from RenderDoc to countless game engine initiatives, various code samples, the AMDVLK driver stack, and countless innovative efforts like GLOVE for OpenGL over Vulkan to Kazan for a Rust-written CPU-based Vulkan implementation and a heck of a lot more.
  • GNOME's Geoclue 2.5 Brings Vala Support, WiFi Geolocation For City-Level Accuracy
    GNOME's Geoclue library that provides a D-Bus service for location information based on GPS receivers, 3G modems, GeoIP, or even WiFi-based geolocation has been baking a lot of changes.
  • Geoclue 2.5.0
    Here is the first release in the 2.5 series.
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  • Wine-Staging 3.18 Released With Some New Patches While Other Code Got Upstreamed
    It has been a very exciting weekend for Linux gamers relying upon Wine for running Windows titles under Linux... There was the routine bi-weekly Wine 3.18 development release on Friday but yesterday brought transform feedback to Vulkan and in turn Stream Output to DXVK to fix up a number of D3D11 games. Today is now the Wine-Staging 3.18 release. Wine-Staging 3.18 doesn't incorporate any changes around the Vulkan code (there is a Wine patch needed by DXVK for this new functionality), but does include a lot of other stuff. Wine-Staging 3.18 implements more functions in the user32 code, including cascade windows, GetPointerType, and others. On the Direct3D front are a few additions to WineD3D, including the ability for the Direct3D 10 support to work with the legacy NVIDIA Linux driver. There is also a kernel fix for allowing Steam log-ins to work again with Wine Staging.