Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LibO

A new web site for the LibreOffice Project

Filed under
LibO

When we first started the LibreOffice Project, we had a gazilion tasks to work on. Among them, we had priorities, most of them involving the code readiness of our first version, LibreOffice 3.3. Another priority was to make sure that the native-lang communities of the now defunct OpenOffice.org project would be able to find the tools needed to work on the releases, (re)create documentation, QA of their localized builds and several other important tasks. These were some of our most crucial priorities; yet among them, you would not have noted “design a nice website”.

Read more

Regione Umbria awarded for the migration to LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO

LibreUmbria, the migration project of Regione Umbria to LibreOffice, has been awarded a prize for innovation – for metholodology and process – as one of top 10 Italian government projects in 2012/2013.

Read more

Rollapp’s Online LibreOffice Nearly Ready for Prime Time – But Not Yet

Filed under
LibO

I wanted to be able to tell you that despite rollApp being in beta it’s pretty much ready to go. Unfortunately, I can’t, because it isn’t. There are some limitations that make using the site a deal breaker for most users. When the developers get those worked out, however, rollApp will be ready to be a major player in the world of online apps.

Read more

The Document Foundation Elects New Directors

Filed under
LibO

They are:

* Thorsten Behrens (previous Deputy Chairman)
* Eliane Domingos de Sousa
* Michael Meeks (returning member)
* Fridrich Strba
* Adam Fyne
* Joel Madero
* Bjoern Michaelsen (returning member)
* Andreas Mantke, Eike Rathke, Norbert Thiebaud (deputies)

Read more

Latest Stable LibreOffice 4.1.4 Released

Filed under
LibO

The Document Foundation today announced the release of LibreOffice 4.1.4, the latest in the stable family of the popular office suite. This update is recommended for anyone using the 4.1 branch, especially those receiving professional support from certified developers. The announcement quotes Thorsten Behrens saying, "When we launched the project, the growth of the ecosystem was a top priority. Today, the large number of migrations to LibreOffice – backed by professional support – show that we were right. There is a bright future in front of us."

Read more

New Goodies Coming in LibreOffice 4.2

Filed under
LibO

The next significant release of LibreOffice is coming at the end of January 2014 and some of the new features are already apparent. The bug hunting session went really well and the next TDF Board elections are about to commence. So, let's take a sneak peek at some of the upcoming changes.

Read more

How to write your book using Linux

Filed under
LibO
Linux
Software

opensource.com: Before starting the book, I had heard a lot of horror stories about people forced to use crazy Word stylesheets and templates from publishers. I was very glad that my publisher didn’t use anything like that, which might have forced me to spend more time in Windows. I decided to work with RTF files and used LibreOffice to write the whole thing.

Calligra vs. LibreOffice: Which Is The More Productive

Filed under
LibO
Software

makeuseof.com: Is LibreOffice the only worthwhile office suite for Linux users? Possibly not, thanks to KDE’s Calligra. With two very good choices at hand, which one do you go for? I compared these two office suites head-to-head on features, design, and compatibility to see which one is the best.

SUSE Forms Partnership to Support LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO
SUSE

ostatic.com: SUSE, the entity behind the popular Linux distributions of similar handles, yesterday made an interesting announcement. In a press release, SUSE announced its LibreOffice team would be teaming up with Collabora Productivity to support LibreOffice commercially.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

IPA Font license added to license list

We recently updated our list of various licenses and comments about them to include the IPA Font license. It is a copyleft free software license for fonts, incompatible with the GPL. Read more

OpenForum Europe Challenges Governments to Walk the Open Format Walk

OpenForum Europe, an advocacy group focusing on IT openness in government, issued a press release earlier today announcing its launch of a new public Internet portal. At that site, anyone can report a government page that offers a document intended for collaborative use for downloading if that document is not available in an OpenDocument Format (ODF) compliant version. The portal is called FixMyDocuments.eu, and you can show your support for the initiative (as I have) by adding your name here (the first supporter listed is the EU's indominatable digital champion, Neelie Kroes). The announcement coincides with the beginning of another initiative, Global Legislative Openness Week, which will involve global activities annd "events hosted by the Legislative Openness Working Group of the Open Government Partnership and members of the parliamentary openness community." A full calendar of events is here. Read more

Nouveau For Linux 3.18 Gains DP Audio, More Re-Clocking

Ben Skeggs sent in his Nouveau DRM driver changes for the drm-next tree of open-source NVIDIA driver improvements that will land in Linux 3.18. With the DRM merge window now closing earlier in the cycle, David Airlie is cutting off new features for the next kernel merge window from landing into drm-next after -rc5 of the current kernel. Thus, this week is the cut-off for new DRM driver functionality aiming for Linux 3.18 with Linux 3.17-rc5 having been released. As such, Ben Skeggs sent in his big batch of Nouveau DRM improvements. Read more

With Android One, Google puts itself firmly back in the OS' driving seat

Under Android One, Google has developed its reference hardware designs — meaning OEMs no longer have to develop and test their own smartphones; they just pick up Google's ready-to-wear versions and get manufacturing. Google already has three local Indian smartphone makers signed up to do just that — Karbonn, Spice, and Micromax — all soon be be selling Google-designed, Android One-powered devices for around $100. Android One uses a stock version of Android, as seen on its Nexus products — meaning no UI customisation is possible — but Google has graciously offered to let OEMs and mobile operators add their own apps to handsets running the OS. The operators don't seem to mind the disintermediation much, and have teamed up with Google to launch Android One mobile plans to coincide with the launch of the new phones. Read more