Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LibO

LibreOffice 6.0 Will Launch with Many Design Improvements, Use Elementary Icons

Filed under
LibO

The major LibreOffice 6.0 release is coming next week, and The Document Foundation's Mike Saunders talked with members of the community to get their perspectives on LibreOffice's new design.

While it won't bring a massive redesign, as most users may have expected, LibreOffice 6.0 will include a few noteworthy design changes, including new table styles, new gradients, updated motif/splash screen, improved Notebookbars, menu and toolbar improvements, and the Elementary icons.

Read more

Quick Look at Notebookbar on LibreOffice 6.0 and Pattern Choices

Filed under
LibO
  • Quick Look at Notebookbar on LibreOffice 6.0

    This is a short preview of how Notebookbar will look like on LibreOffice 6.0. Notebookbar is a new toolbar appearance on LibreOffice since version 5.3 that look similar to Microsoft Office 2007 Ribbon Toolbar. It's tabbed, column based, and categorized. We can use Notebookbar on Writer, Calc, and Impress already. It's still a experimental feature for now, so it's not recommended for production use. However, it's already good looking at LibreOffice 6.0 and we need to see more. I show here screenshots of Writer's Notebookbar from all tabs with some commentary.

  • LibreOffice bitmap pattern

    Do you like to use nice bitmap pattern in LibreOffice for area fill. So if you draw a rectangular, a start, … whatever you can use this bitmaps.

    With the help of designers from openclipart, pixabay, publicdomainpictures, … I made 42 seamless area bitmap pattern but only 50% are needed. So which one do you like which one can be dropped.

WINE Linux and Upcoming LibreOffice 6.0

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux
  • Is WINE Linux Enterprise Friendly?

    Migrating to a new operating system is not a simple task, especially for enterprise users. This has led many people to exploring whether WINE on Linux is an enterprise friendly solution. This article will look at working examples at how it can be, but may not be the best idea for a long term approach.

  • LibreOffice 6.0 Launches January 31 with New Libraries to Export EPUB3 Files

    The Document Liberation Project announced today the availability of five new or improved libraries designed to aid the export of EPUB3 files and import of several widely-used document formats.

    LibreOffice 6.0, the next major release of the acclaimed open-source and cross-platform office suite, is slated for release at the end of the month, on January 31, and it will incorporate a bunch of new libraries that'll make it easier for users to export or import various document formats.

    These libraries will give LibreOffice 6.0 compatibility with the EPUB3 (export only), AbiWord, Microsoft Publisher, PageMaker, and QuarkXPress documents (import only). However, they can also be used as standalone libraries for any other open source software project that needs them.

Educational-Oriented Escuelas Linux 5.6 Distro Released with LibreOffice 6.0

Filed under
LibO
Linux

Based on the latest release of the Ubuntu-based and Enlightenment-focused Bodhi Linux operating system, Escuelas Linux 5.6 is powered by the Linux 4.14.13 kernel, which includes patches against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities, and comes with a bunch of up-to-date educational apps.

These include the OnlyOffice 4.8.6 office suite (only for the 64-bit edition), Vivaldi 1.13, Chromium 63, Google Chrome 63, and Mozilla Firefox 57 "Quantum" web browsers, Geogebra 5.0.414 geometry, algebra, statistics, and calculus app, latest Adobe Flash Player 28 plugin, and the upcoming LibreOffice 6.0 open-source office suite.

Read more

Collabora's CODE 3.0 Adds Rich LibreOffice Editing Functionality to the Browser

Filed under
LibO

Collabora Productivity, through Michael Meeks, is proud to inform Softpedia today on the general availability of the Collabora Online Development Edition (CODE) 3.0 LibreOffice-based office suite.

Collabora Productivity driving force behind putting LibreOffice in the Cloud (LibreOffice Online), and they worked very hard during the past year to bring you CODE 3.0, which boasts, for the very first time, full-featured editing functionality from the desktop version of the LibreOffice open-source office suite to the browser.

Users will now be able to enjoy complex writer numbering or powerful spreadsheet filtering with the new CODE 3.0 release. More such complex UI functionality will be coming to future versions of Collabora Online, sharing the user experience with LibreOffice both online and on the desktop.

Read more

LibreOffice 5.4.4

Filed under
LibO

The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.4.4, the fourth minor release of LibreOffice 5.4 family, one month before the major announcement of LibreOffice 6.0. Although it still represents the bleeding edge in term of features, conservative users and enterprises can start the update process from their current LibreOffice 5.3 implementation.

TDF suggests to conservative users and enterprises to deploy LibreOffice with the backing of certified developers, migrators and trainers (an updated list is available at https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/professional-support/). This is extremely important for the growth of the LibreOffice ecosystem.

Read more

Also:

  • LibreOffice 5.4.4 Released with 83 Fixes, LibreOffice 5.3 Users Urged to Upgrade

    The Document Foundation announced on Wednesday the release and immediate availability for download of the fourth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.4 office suite series.

    LibreOffice 5.4.4 comes five weeks after the release of version 5.4.3 to brings a total of 83 improvements and bug fixes for various of the included components, such as Writer, Calc, Draw, Impress, Math, and Base. The complete changelogs are available here and here for those curious to know what exactly was changed, and The Document Foundation now recommends LibreOffice 5.3 users to upgrade.

  • KDE Calligra 3.1 Preparing For Release In Early 2018

6 LibreOffice Tips To Get More Out of It

Filed under
LibO

LibreOffice is an excellent office suite. These LibreOffice tips will enable you to use it more effectively.
Read more

LibreOffice 6.0 Release Candidate Will Arrive Just in Time for Christmas Testing

Filed under
LibO

LibreOffice 6.0 just exited beta testing and the development cycle will continue this week with the first Release Candidate, which should be available to download by the end of the week as The Document Foundation plans a third bug hunting session just before the Christmas holidays, on December 22, 2017.

"On December 22 we will have an international Bug Hunting Session (BHS), testing the RC1 (first release candidate) of LibreOffice 6.0," writes Mike Saunders. "You can download, try out and test this RC1 version – and if you spot any bugs, let our QA (Quality Assurance) community know."

Read more

Elementary LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO

Two months ago I start to finalize the existing Elementary icon theme for LibreOffice. It’s about 2.000 icons and now they are available in LibreOffice 6.0 beta. In addition all icons are available as svg file so it can be used and edit in an easy way.

Read more

LibreOffice 6.0 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed, Along with KDE Apps 17.12

Filed under
LibO

A total of six snapshots have been released to the public this month, as OpenSuSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger announced this past weekend, and they brought lots of goodies, along with some of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software components. But first, there's been a bunch of more python2->python3 conversions lately that you should know about.

"For the ones that don’t know yet, the python2 -> python3 switches are especially of interest to SLE/Leap 15," said Dominique Leuenberger. "Minimizing the support surface for Python 2 in favor of Python 3 will lead to a much stronger, supportable product for the future. As Tumbleweed is the leading and trendsetting product, it is but natural that we get those changes as well."

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE/SUSE: SLES for SAP and Christian Boltz Introduced

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications support update
    SUSE has announced effective December 1, 2018, two changes to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications product. SLES for SAP Applications now includes support for a given service pack for 4.5 years with the regular subscription while the basic codestream is general available and itself fully maintained. This change reflects the request from clients to align OS upgrades with hardware life cycles. To explain this a bit further, this change affects SLES for SAP Applications 12 and 15 code streams. SLES for SAP Applications 11 is at the end of the general availability already, therefore SLES for SAP Applications 11 SP4 is the last service pack. If clients choose to stay on SLES for SAP Applications 11, then they will need to purchase LTSS to ensure ongoing support. This is especially true for clients that run SAP HANA 1 workloads on IBM Power Systems servers in Big Endian mode.
  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Christian Boltz
    With two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

ArchLabs Refresh Release, 2019.01.20

Gidday ArchLabbers, Happy New Year. With the new year comes an ISO refresh. All changes are listed at the change-log. If you encounter any issues, please post them at the forum. Also, ArchLabs related bugs need to be raised at BitBucket. Read more

Programming: Homebrew 1.9, JBoss EAP, Python, Qt and Inclusion

  • Homebrew 1.9 Adds Linux Support, Auto-Cleanup, and More
    The latest release of popular macOS package manager Homebrew includes support for Linux, optional automatic package cleanup, and extended binary package support. Linux support, merged from the Linuxbrew project, is still in beta and will become stable in version 2.0. It also enables the use of Homebrew on Windows 10 systems with the Windows Subsystem for Linux installed. Auto-cleanup is meant to optimize disk space occupation by removing all intermediate data that Homebrew generates when installing packages. This can be a significant amount when Homebrew actually builds the packages from sources instead of just installing binaries. Auto-cleanup is opt-in by setting the HOMEBREW_INSTALL_CLEANUP. This behaviour will become opt-out in version 2.0, where you will be able to set the HOMEBREW_NO_INSTALL_CLEANUP environment variable to disable auto-cleanup.
  • Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1
  • Counteracting Code Complexity With Wily - Episode 195
    As we build software projects, complexity and technical debt are bound to creep into our code. To counteract these tendencies it is necessary to calculate and track metrics that highlight areas of improvement so that they can be acted on. To aid in identifying areas of your application that are breeding grounds for incidental complexity Anthony Shaw created Wily. In this episode he explains how Wily traverses the history of your repository and computes code complexity metrics over time and how you can use that information to guide your refactoring efforts.
  • Qt Visual Studio Tools 2.3.1 Released
    The Qt VS Tools version 2.3.1 has now been released to the Visual Studio Marketplace.
  • Ben Cotton: Inclusion is a necessary part of good coding
    Too often I see comments like “some people would rather focus on inclusion than write good code.” Not only is that a false dichotomy, but it completely misrepresents the relationship between the two. Inclusion doesn’t come at the cost of good code, it’s a necessary part of good code. We don’t write code for the sake of writing code. We write code for people to use it in some way. This means that the code needs to work for the people. In order to do that, the people designing and implementing the technology need to consider different experiences. The best way to do that is to have people with different experiences be on the team. As my 7th grade algebra teacher was fond of reminding us: garbage in, garbage out.

Graphics: Vega, Radeon, Wayland on BSD

  • Vega 10 & Newer Getting More Fine-Grained PowerPlay Controls On Linux
    With the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel cycle, discrete Radeon graphics cards based on Vega 10 and newer will have fine-grained controls over what PowerPlay power management features are enabled and the ability to toggle them at run-time. Queued into the work-in-progress AMDGPU code for the eventual Linux 5.1 kernel cycle is now a ppfeatures for sysfs. This new "ppfeatures" file on sysfs will allow for querying the PowerPlay features state and toggling them individually. This includes features like GFXOFF (the ability to turn off the graphics engine when idling), automatic fan control, LED display for GPU activity, the dynamic power management state for the various blocks, and other features. Up to now the PowerPlay features couldn't be toggled individually but just a blanket enable/disable.
  • AMD Radeon 7 Will Have Day One Linux Support
    Linux gamers shouldn't see a repeat performance of the Radeon RX 590 situation.
  • Wayland Support On The BSDs Continuing To Improve
    While Wayland was designed on and for Linux systems, the BSD support for Wayland and the various compositors has continued improving particularly over the past year or so but it's still a lengthy journey. In a little more than one year, the FreeBSD Wayland support has been on a steady rise. It's looking like this year could even mark the KDE Wayland session for FreeBSD potentially getting squared away. Besides KDE, the GNOME Wayland work for FreeBSD has advanced a bit and is available in some FreeBSD Ports but there has been some complications around libinput and its Linux'isms. Details on the current state of Wayland-related components in FreeBSD is drafted at the FreeBSD Wiki.