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EU institutions accused of doing nothing to free themselves from dependence on Microsoft

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The European Commission and European Parliament are doing nothing to rid themselves of their dependance on Microsoft, two lobby groups said Wednesday, Document Freedom Day.

The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) and Open Forum Europe urged EU institutions to support open standards in an open letter to Giancarlo Vilella, president of the European Parliament's Directorate-General for Innovation and Technological Support. He also chairs the body that coordinates IT activities for government agencies including Parliament, the Commission and the Council of the E.U.

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LibreOffice 4.2.3 RC2 Arrives with Multiple Fixes on Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X

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The developers from The Document Foundation are not wasting any time and are pushing ahead with the latest branch, 4.2.3. The previous RC version was made available only a couple of weeks ago, and now the second one can be downloaded.

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It’s Document Freedom Day 2014: What Does that Mean for You?

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You’ll recall that I noted above Document Freedom Day awareness is limited in the U.S. So is participation in DFD activities, as you can see from the image at left, which shows where they are being held this year. That’s a shame, because document freedom is a universal, and not a regional or national concern.

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ODF vs. OOXML: War of the Words Chapter 3 – What a Difference a Decade Can Make

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Moreover, in the years to come, PC-based word processing products like WordStar, and then WordPerfect, would become far more popular than Microsoft’s own first word processing (originally called Multitool Word), providing low-cost alternatives to the proprietary minicomputer based software offerings of vendors like Wang Laboratories. IBM, too, provided a word processing program for the PC called DisplayWriter. That software was based on a similar program that IBM had developed for its mainframe systems customers. More importantly, another program was launched at just the right time to dramatically accelerate the sale of IBM PCs and their clones. That product was the legendary “killer app” of the IBM PC clone market: Lotus 1-2-3, the spreadsheet software upon which Mitch Kapor built the fortunes of his Lotus Development Corporation.

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[LibreOffice] Freshly Stable

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With the release of our new LibreOffice 4.2 version and the new website, people have noticed a small yet quite visual change in the way we label the versions of LibreOffice. You now have the choice between downloading LibreOffice “Fresh” or “Stable”.

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MEP Tarand: "EU should switch to ODF standard"

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The European institutions should switch to using the Open Document Format ODF as their internal default document format, says Member of the European Parliament Indrek Tarand. Speaking at a meeting of the European Parliament's Free Software User Group (Epfsug), last week Wednesday, MEP Tarand said: "Moving to ODF would allow real innovation, and real procurement."

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Zorin OS Cubed, "Fresh" LibreOffice, and Year of Linux

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In today's search was two Zorin OS reviews and a recommendation. The Document Foundation released the second update to the 4.2 branch of their popular office suite. Jamie Watson got a new Acer laptop and test drove several popular distributions on it. Computer Weekly online has published an article on Unix to Linux migrations and Simon Phipps put out a new post titled 2014 is the year of the Linux desktop.

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ODF vs. OOXML: War of the Words

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The story has other notable features as well: ODF is the first IT standard to be taken up as a popular cause, and also represents the first “cross over” standards issue that has attracted the broad support of the open source community. Then there are the societal dimensions: open formats are needed to safeguard our culture and our history from oblivion. And when implemented in open source software and deployed on Linux-based systems (not to mention One Laptop Per Child computers), the benefits and opportunities of IT become more available to those throughout the third world.

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Document Freedom Matters

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As the Document Freedom Day is approaching I realized that we don’t push ODF and open standards as loudly as before. Certainly most of the battles for the mind and market share are past, at least when it comes to office file formats. But the recent public consultation of the UK government brought back some of the most crucial issues surrounding ODF and it’s useful, I think, to check where stand these days on these matters.

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Breaking Microsoft’s Chains by Moving to LibreOffice

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Vignoli is one of the founders and a member of the Board of Directors of The Document Foundation, the organization behind LibreOffice, where his duties include marketing and communications as well as being an international spokesperson for the project. Before helping start The Document Project, he spent over six years on the marketing team for OpenOffice.org, which was the original code base for LibreOffice. In other words, this is a guy who knows his stuff and who has “been there/done that” when it comes to large enterprise level migrations from MS Office to LibreOffice or OpenOffice.

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Linux Foundation's certification sets new benchmark for admins

At LinuxCon last week, the Linux Foundation announced a new certification scheme for Linux professionals to complement their existing training activities. The Linux Foundation Certification Program offers a peer-verified certification for both early-career and engineer-level systems administrators for a fee of $300. The process involves a real-time skill test administered via a remote-access virtual machine running one of several Linux distributions. To ensure the rules are followed, a human proctor watches the test via screen-sharing and video camera using your own computer at a location of your choice. The certification tests real-world skills for both sys admins and more senior engineers at the command line and in configuration files. Read more

Linux Mint Debian to Be Called "Betsy"

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Adapting to the Mobile World

Now more than ever companies are gaining a mobile presence due to the popularity of smartphones and tablets. It is important to any company’s success to become part of the mobile world if they want to build business. Consumers used to look up companies in the phonebook, but now the first action consumers take when they need to find a company is to look them up online. If consumers cannot find a company online, they are likely to find a different company instead of continuing the search through other means. Because the Internet is so easily accessed from mobile devices now, consumers use their devices to find their favorite companies so a strong mobile presence is a must if companies do not want to lose business. Hasbro goes mobile According to Mobile Marketer, Hasbro has decided to create a mobile presence in order to keep up with video games. So far Hasbro’s Monopoly application has been a great success because it promotes family and friend engagement and users can personalize the app by uploading pictures of themselves to use as game pieces. Consumers like personalization, and so if companies want to see success from their mobile marketing strategies they should consider personalizing them to consumers in some way. Companies hesitate to go mobile because they are set in their ways, and they might already be seeing success, however as technology advances all companies should consider building a mobile presence if they want to continue to be successful. Successful mobile marketing techniques Thanks to mobile devices there are a number of ways companies can reach out to consumers who use them. SMS advertisements are a great way to personalize advertising for consumers making them feel important and ultimately driving in business. Marketing applications are another way companies can engage with consumers on a more personal basis. Consumers like to be in control, and applications are a great way they can control the type of marketing they receive. If apps are intriguing enough, consumers are likely to promote them to friends and family, which will ultimately promote business. Convenience of being mobile Consumers like the convenience of being able to locate and engage with their favorite companies from their mobile devices, so it is important that companies maintain that presence. Consumers are looking for ways to make their lives easier, and being able to purchase products with the click of a button or pay bills on the fly will only increase business for companies because consumers are always looking for convenience. Being mobile can benefit companies in several ways, but one way that is especially appealing to companies is the ease of keeping track of business thanks to their mobile presence. Mobile devices and websites help companies to keep track of important data such as which marketing strategies are working the best and where most of the sales are coming from. Being mobile can enhance business in several ways and should be a priority for all companies. Mobile Technology News brought to you by businesstexter.com Source: mobilemarketer.com/cms/news/gaming/18437.html

Why we use open source - Australia’s Immigration agency explains

Why choose open source? “In some ways, [the open source software used by the agency] is effectively more capable” than commercial products, he said. “In terms of cost-effectiveness, [it] wins hands down: no license/maintenance fees, extensible architecture [and] global open source R&D.” The team uses an open source software package called ‘R’. Read more