Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LibO

Oracle/Kernel/LibreOffice: DTrace, Linux, and LibreOffice 6.1 Schedule

Filed under
LibO
  • DTrace on Linux: an Update

    DTrace offers easy-but-powerful dynamic tracing of system behavior, and it is so lightweight and safe that it can routinely be used on production systems. DTrace was originally developed for the Oracle Solaris operating system.

  • Oracle Updates DTrace For Linux With ARM64 Support, Feature Updates

    At the beginning of the year Oracle reaffirmed their commitment for DTrace on Linux. For those still interested in using this dynamic tracing framework on Linux, Oracle has been rolling out a number of feature updates.

    Oracle has made a number of recent updates to the DTrace framework on Linux. Recent DTrace for Linux improvements include support for 64-bit ARM (ARM64 / AArch64), support for additional providers, bringing feature alignment with other DTrace implementations, compile-time array bounds checking, support for newer versions of the Linux kernel, PID provider support for user-space tracing, and various bug fixes.

  • LibreOffice 6.1 RC2 Released For Testing This Next Open-Source Office Suite Update

    LibreOffice 6.1 is planned for release by the middle of August but for that next version to happen without a hitch, the LibreOffice team could use a hand with the testing of their latest release candidates.

LibreOffice 6.1 On Track for Mid-August Release as Second RC Is Out for Testing

Filed under
LibO

Coming only two weeks after the first Release Candidate, LibreOffice 6.1 RC2 (Release Candidate 2) is here to fix more of those annoyances and bugs that might block the final release. A total of 84 bugs have been squashed across various components in LibreOffice 6.1 RC2 compared to the first Release Candidate.

While LibreOffice 6.1 is on track for its mid-August release, the development team still needs your help to test these Release Candidate versions and report any bugs or issues you may encounter, or just give positive feedback if everything works well for you during testing.

Read more

LibreOffice With Microsoft DRM and a Tax

Filed under
LibO
Microsoft
Legal

LibreOffice and Plasma

Filed under
KDE
LibO

At KDAB, we know that consistency is an important aspect of the User Experience – users don’t want to have to learn different ways to achieve the same thing. In the Linux world, there is a major structural pitfall to this: the applications written for Linux come in at least two major technologies – Qt and GTK. Each of these frameworks deeply influences the experience the user has, and in different ways. As you’d expect, the frameworks have their own helper-dialogs e.g. to open or save a file or for printing. This can make it confusing for users, when the apps they use don’t show the same helper-dialogs for common actions.

Read more

LibreOffice 6.1 Release Candidate Available Now for Final Bug Hunting Session

Filed under
LibO

Tomorrow, July 6, The Document Foundation plans to host the third and final bug hunting session for the LibreOffice 6.1 office suite, due for release in mid-August 2018. This bug hunting session is aimed at fixing last remaining issue against the Release Candidate milestone.

Those interested in joining the final bug hunting session to find, report and triage bugs can now download the first Release Candidate version of LibreOffice 6.1 for GNU/Linux as DEB and RPM packages, as well as for macOS and Microsoft Windows platforms.

Read more

LibreOffice styles - My style is the bomb didi bom di deng

Filed under
LibO

LibreOffice styles management sure can benefit from improvements. All office suites can. Not only that, there are dozens of other areas where this free office suite could better itself. But to focus on the original question, styles in LibreOffice are different from Microsoft Office, but they work reasonably well.

There are some annoyances - selected text, the style and tab jumps on selection, and the lack of global export. On the other hand, you have the preview option, and the modify sub-menu is powerful and rather intuitive. Usable and reasonable. Now, that does not mean you should toss away your payware suite and go free. Not at all. The specific, individual needs are very delicate. Moreover, while LibreOffice has improved a lot, it's still not quite as powerful as Microsoft Office, and this is more evident in Calc and Impress, less so in Writer, which often gets most attention and care. But it is marching in the right direction, and if you're keen on doing documents right, you need to use styles. And when it comes to styles, LibreOffice 6.0 works fairly well. But the quest for perfection continues. So long and thanks for all the fonts.

Read more

Checking out the notebookbar and other improvements in LibreOffice 6.0

Filed under
LibO

With any new openSUSE release, I am interested in the improvements that the big applications have made. One of these big applications is LibreOffice. Ever since LibreOffice has forked from OpenOffice.org, there has been a constant delivery of new features and new fixes every 6 months. openSUSE Leap 15 brought us the upgrade from LibreOffice 5.3.3 to LibreOffice 6.0.4. In this post, I will highlight the improvements that I found most newsworthy.

Read more

Also: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Officially Released

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

Filed under
LibO

The Document Foundation informed Softpedia today about the general availability of the fifth point release of the LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite for all supported operating systems.

LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments.

Read more

Direct: The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.0.5

KDE and GNOME: File Picker, Flatpaks and Epiphany 3.29

Filed under
KDE
LibO
GNOME
  • LibreOffice Picks Up A Native "KDE 5" File Picker

    Several months back LibreOffice developers began working on better integration with KDE Plasma 5 and that has advanced again today with now having a native file picker.

  • Going In-Depth With Flatpak For Sandboxed Application Packaging

    Red Hat / GNOME developer veteran Matthias Clasen has recently begun a series of blog posts going in-depth with Flatpaks for those wondering how this application deployment technology is taking over the Linux desktop.

    Last week Clasen penned the initial piece for explaining bundles, runtimes, and extensions in the Flatpak realm.

  • Epiphany 3.29.3 Picks Up A Reader Mode, Finally Disables NPAPI Plugins

    Epiphany 3.29.3 is now available as the latest version of this GNOME Web Browser.

    Being in the middle of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle, the Epiphany 3.29.3 release is made up of many changes. First up, Epiphany now has an experimental reader mode that is inspired by Mozilla's Firefox reader mode. When viewing page sources in Epiphany, it will also now display within the web browser itself rather than the text editor.

Microsoft Copying Free/Libre Software

Filed under
LibO
Microsoft
  • Microsoft begins rolling out a simplified ribbon for Office [iophk: "This Microsoft's gratuitous loss of productivity for those who have failed to move to LibreOffice"]

     

    Changes will arrive on Office.com starting immediately, with Outlook Insiders who are blessed appropriately will take part in a limited rollout in July. No plans are in place for the rest of the Office ecosystem, but we'd place a small side-wager on it happening to coincide with Office 2019. In all cases, the old ribbon won't disappear, but it won't be default anymore.

  • Microsoft's Office UI update includes a simpler, cleaner ribbon

     

    Microsoft has given its infamous Office ribbon a much simpler, much less cluttered look as part of its interface redesign for Office.com and Office 365 applications. The tech giant has updated the element to only show the most basic options -- if you need any of the commands the redesign hides, though, you can always expand it to go back to its more familiar 3-line predecessor and make sure you can quickly accomplish your tasks.

  • Microsoft's New Operating System Based On Linux [Ed: Same GNU/Linux that Microsoft is blackmailing using software patents when it's not Microsoft's]

    Microsoft says that Linux kernel has been reworked with security innovations that were pioneers in Windows to create a highly secure environment. We are seeing something that many would never have imagined, Microsoft applying what they have learned from security working in Windows to a Linux kernel implementation.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE/SUSE: SLES for SAP and Christian Boltz Introduced

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications support update
    SUSE has announced effective December 1, 2018, two changes to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications product. SLES for SAP Applications now includes support for a given service pack for 4.5 years with the regular subscription while the basic codestream is general available and itself fully maintained. This change reflects the request from clients to align OS upgrades with hardware life cycles. To explain this a bit further, this change affects SLES for SAP Applications 12 and 15 code streams. SLES for SAP Applications 11 is at the end of the general availability already, therefore SLES for SAP Applications 11 SP4 is the last service pack. If clients choose to stay on SLES for SAP Applications 11, then they will need to purchase LTSS to ensure ongoing support. This is especially true for clients that run SAP HANA 1 workloads on IBM Power Systems servers in Big Endian mode.
  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Christian Boltz
    With two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

ArchLabs Refresh Release, 2019.01.20

Gidday ArchLabbers, Happy New Year. With the new year comes an ISO refresh. All changes are listed at the change-log. If you encounter any issues, please post them at the forum. Also, ArchLabs related bugs need to be raised at BitBucket. Read more

Programming: Homebrew 1.9, JBoss EAP, Python, Qt and Inclusion

  • Homebrew 1.9 Adds Linux Support, Auto-Cleanup, and More
    The latest release of popular macOS package manager Homebrew includes support for Linux, optional automatic package cleanup, and extended binary package support. Linux support, merged from the Linuxbrew project, is still in beta and will become stable in version 2.0. It also enables the use of Homebrew on Windows 10 systems with the Windows Subsystem for Linux installed. Auto-cleanup is meant to optimize disk space occupation by removing all intermediate data that Homebrew generates when installing packages. This can be a significant amount when Homebrew actually builds the packages from sources instead of just installing binaries. Auto-cleanup is opt-in by setting the HOMEBREW_INSTALL_CLEANUP. This behaviour will become opt-out in version 2.0, where you will be able to set the HOMEBREW_NO_INSTALL_CLEANUP environment variable to disable auto-cleanup.
  • Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1
  • Counteracting Code Complexity With Wily - Episode 195
    As we build software projects, complexity and technical debt are bound to creep into our code. To counteract these tendencies it is necessary to calculate and track metrics that highlight areas of improvement so that they can be acted on. To aid in identifying areas of your application that are breeding grounds for incidental complexity Anthony Shaw created Wily. In this episode he explains how Wily traverses the history of your repository and computes code complexity metrics over time and how you can use that information to guide your refactoring efforts.
  • Qt Visual Studio Tools 2.3.1 Released
    The Qt VS Tools version 2.3.1 has now been released to the Visual Studio Marketplace.
  • Ben Cotton: Inclusion is a necessary part of good coding
    Too often I see comments like “some people would rather focus on inclusion than write good code.” Not only is that a false dichotomy, but it completely misrepresents the relationship between the two. Inclusion doesn’t come at the cost of good code, it’s a necessary part of good code. We don’t write code for the sake of writing code. We write code for people to use it in some way. This means that the code needs to work for the people. In order to do that, the people designing and implementing the technology need to consider different experiences. The best way to do that is to have people with different experiences be on the team. As my 7th grade algebra teacher was fond of reminding us: garbage in, garbage out.

Graphics: Vega, Radeon, Wayland on BSD

  • Vega 10 & Newer Getting More Fine-Grained PowerPlay Controls On Linux
    With the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel cycle, discrete Radeon graphics cards based on Vega 10 and newer will have fine-grained controls over what PowerPlay power management features are enabled and the ability to toggle them at run-time. Queued into the work-in-progress AMDGPU code for the eventual Linux 5.1 kernel cycle is now a ppfeatures for sysfs. This new "ppfeatures" file on sysfs will allow for querying the PowerPlay features state and toggling them individually. This includes features like GFXOFF (the ability to turn off the graphics engine when idling), automatic fan control, LED display for GPU activity, the dynamic power management state for the various blocks, and other features. Up to now the PowerPlay features couldn't be toggled individually but just a blanket enable/disable.
  • AMD Radeon 7 Will Have Day One Linux Support
    Linux gamers shouldn't see a repeat performance of the Radeon RX 590 situation.
  • Wayland Support On The BSDs Continuing To Improve
    While Wayland was designed on and for Linux systems, the BSD support for Wayland and the various compositors has continued improving particularly over the past year or so but it's still a lengthy journey. In a little more than one year, the FreeBSD Wayland support has been on a steady rise. It's looking like this year could even mark the KDE Wayland session for FreeBSD potentially getting squared away. Besides KDE, the GNOME Wayland work for FreeBSD has advanced a bit and is available in some FreeBSD Ports but there has been some complications around libinput and its Linux'isms. Details on the current state of Wayland-related components in FreeBSD is drafted at the FreeBSD Wiki.