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LibO

These are the 12 Potential LibreOffice Mascots

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LibO

If you have anything approaching a memory you may recall that The Document Foundation is on the hunt for a LibreOffice mascot. Ring any bells?

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LibreOffice 5.4.3 Office Suite Released with over 50 Bug and Regression Fixes

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LibO

LibreOffice 5.4.3 comes about five weeks after the 5.4.2 maintenance update and it's a minor point release that attempts to fix even more bugs and regressions that have been discovered in the previous version.

According to the changelogs for the RC1 and RC2 development milestone, a total of 52 issues were addressed in the LibreOffice 5.4.3 release across various of the components of the office suite. Check out each changelog if you're curious to know what exactly was fixed.

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LibreOffice Lands An Initial Qt5 Interface Plugin

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KDE
LibO

A new VCL plug-in that is in development will allow LibreOffice to blend nicely with the KDE Plasma / Qt5 desktop.

The Visual Components Library (VCL) that allows LibreOffice to make use of functionality across different graphical tool-kits and operating systems now has a Qt5 plug-in.

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LibreOffice 5.3.7 Is the Last in the Series, End of Life Set for November 26

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LibO

LibreOffice 5.3.7 is now available as the latest update for the series, bringing a total of 49 bug fixes for various of the office suite's components, including Writer, Calc, Draw, Impress, Base, and Math. To see what exactly was changed in this point release, you can study the changelog attached at the end of the article.

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How to create an e-book chapter template in LibreOffice Writer

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HowTos

For many people, using a word processor is the fastest, easiest, and most familiar way to write and publish an e-book. But firing up your word processor and typing away isn't enough—you need to follow a format.

That's where a template comes in. A template ensures that your book has a consistent look and feel. Luckily, creating a template is quick and easy, and the time and effort you spend on it will give you a better-looking book.

In this article, I'll walk you through how to create a simple template for writing individual chapters of an e-book using LibreOffice Writer. You can use this template for both PDF and EPUB books and modify it to suit your needs.

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LibreOffice, LiMux, KDE, Qt, and Krita

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KDE
LibO
  • Coming up on Friday: first Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 6.0 Alpha 1

    The LibreOffice community has returned from a great conference in Rome (more on that later this week), and we’re now working eagerly on LibreOffice 6.0, which is due to be released at the end of January 2018. This version will include a large number of new features – and those already implemented are summarised on the release notes page.

  • LibreOffice Is Getting New Look for KDE's Plasma Desktop Thanks to LiMux Project

    During the LibreOffice Conference 2017 event that took place in Rome, Italy, from October 10 to October 13, there were talks about the status the Qt 5 port of LibreOffice's VCL plugin for KDE Plasma.

    Every year, The Document Foundation plans and organizes a LibreOffice Conference event where developers, contributors, sponsors, users, and other members of the LibreOffice community can gather to talk about the future of the Open Souce office suite.

    And this year they planned the new features of the next major release of the cross-platform office suite, LibreOffice 6.0, which will arrive in late January 2018 with a new look for the KDE Plasma desktop environment, work that will be sponsored by the LiMux project.

  • KDE still makes Qt

    A couple of years ago, I made a blog post, KDE makes Qt, with data about which percentage of Qt contributions came from people starting in KDE. Basically, how many Qt contributions are made by people who used KDE as a “gateway” drug into it.

  • Krita 3.3.1 Best Alternative To Photoshop for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Krita is a KDE program for sketching and painting, although it has image processing capabilities, offering an end–to–end solution for creating digital painting files from scratch by masters. Fields of painting that Krita explicitly supports are concept art, creation of comics and textures for rendering. Modelled on existing real-world painting materials and workflows, Krita supports creative working by getting out of the way and with a snappy response.

LibreOffice 6.0 Arrives Late January 2018, First Bug Hunting Session Starts Soon

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LibO

Now that the LibreOffice Conference 2017 event is over, it's time for The Document Foundation to start the bug hunting sessions, and the first one was set for the end of the week, October 20, 2017, for the first Alpha release of the LibreOffice 6.0 office suite.

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Events: LibreOffice Conference 2017 and Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

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LibO
Linux
  • LibreOffice Conference 2017

    This week the annual LibreOffice conference was held in Rome and I had the pleasure to attend. The city of Rome is migrating their IT infrastructure to open software and standards and the city council was kind enough to provide the awesome venue for the event, the Campidoglio.

  • More from the testing and fuzzing microconference

    A lot was discussed and presented in the three hours allotted to the Testing and Fuzzing microconference at this year's Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), but some spilled out of that slot. We have already looked at some discussions on kernel testing that occurred both before and during the microconference. Much of the rest of the discussion will be summarized below. As it turns out, a discussion on the efforts by Intel to do continuous-integration (CI) testing of graphics hardware and drivers continued several hundred miles north the following week at the X.Org Developers Conference (XDC); that will be covered in a separate article.

  • The NumWorks graphing calculator

    As the Internet of Things (IoT) becomes ever more populous, there is no shortage of people warning us that the continual infusion into our lives of hard-to-patch proprietary devices running hard-to-maintain proprietary code is a bit of a problem. It is an act of faith for some, myself included, that open devices running free software (whether IoT devices or not) are easier to maintain than proprietary, closed ones. So it's always of interest when freedom (or something close to it) makes its way into a class of devices that were not previously so blessed.

    In this case, the device is the humble scientific calculator. Many people now use their smartphones when they need to do sums, but others still find a calculator a useful thing to have at hand. Recently, NumWorks, a new scientific graphing calculator with an open-design ethos was released. Although it is far from fully free at this point, it is a major step forward from the user-hostile position most calculator manufacturers have taken, and it is interesting to see to what extent it fulfills its promise.

    [...]

    It also would not require NumWorks to try to make the in-browser support work on all the browsers that people use on their many Linux distributions; so Linux support may get better soon. For readers who want to get up and running now, the toolchain isn't all that painful to assemble.

Collabora Online 2.1.4 released

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LibO

Collabora Productivity, the driving force behind putting LibreOffice in the Cloud, is excited to announce a new release of its flagship enterprise-ready cloud document suite – Collabora Online 2.1.4, with new features and multiple improvements.

The Collabora Online Development Edition (CODE) has been updated to version 2.1.4 as well.

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Voting Open — Help Choose the New LibreOffice Mascot

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LibO

Community voting has opened in the LibreOffice mascot competition.

The contest launched back in June, with LibreOffice inviting the community to submit their designs for use a potential project.

Four months on and the contest now moves on to the next stage: shaving the slew of submissions down to a succinct shortlist of only the strongest entries.

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Also: Geary 0.12 Released, Here’s How To Install It on Ubuntu

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.

Software: GIMP, Spyder, SMPlayer

  • Five free photo and video editing tools that could save burning a hole in your pocket and take your creativity to the next level
    GIMP stands for the Gnu Image Manipulation Program and is the first word that people usually think about when it comes to free image editors. It’s a raster graphics editor, available on multiple platforms on PC. It has a similar interface to Photoshop: you have your tools on one side, there’s an option for your tool window and then you have your layers window on another side. Perhaps one of the most useful features of GIMP is the option of plugins. There is a wide database for them and there’s a plugin for almost any task you might need to carry out. GIMP is extremely extensive, and it’s the choice of the FOSS community, thanks to the fact that it’s also open source. However, there are also some disadvantages. For example, GIMP has no direct RAW support yet (you have to install a plugin to enable it, which means a split workflow). It also has quite a bit of a learning curve as compared to Photoshop or Lightroom.
  • Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment
    If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python.
  • SMPlayer 18.2.2 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA
    SMPlayer is a free media player created for Linux and Windows, it was released under GNU General Public License. Unlike other players it doesn't require you to install codecs to play something because it carries its own all required codecs with itself. This is the first release which now support MPV and some other features such as MPRIS v2 Support, new theme, 3D stereo filter and more. It uses the award-winning MPlayer as playback engine which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats (avi, mkv, wmv, mp4, mpeg... see list).

Funding: Ethereum and Outreachy

  • How Will a $100 Mln Grant Help Ethereum Scale?
    On Feb. 16, six large-scale Blockchain projects OmiseGo, Cosmos, Golem, Maker and Raiden, that have completed successful multi-million dollar initial coin offerings (ICOs) last year, along with Japanese venture capital firm Global Brain have created the Ethereum Community Fund (ECF), to fund projects and businesses within the Ethereum ecosystem.
  • Outreachy Is Now Accepting Applications For Their Summer 2018 Internships
    This week Google announced the participating organizations for GSoC 2018 for students wishing to get involved with open-source/Linux development. Also happening this week is the application period opened for those wishing to participate in the summer 2018 paid internship program.