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LibreOffice 6.0.6 Office Suite Released with 55 Bug Fixes, Download Now

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Security

Coming about six weeks after the LibreOffice 6.0.5 maintenance update, the LibreOffice 6.0.6 point release is here to further improve and stability and reliability of the LibreOffice 6.0 office suite series for all supported platforms by addressing a total of 55 bugs and other issues reported by users lately for various core components. Detailed changelogs are available here and here.

When they released the LibreOffice 6.0.5 update back in June 2018, The Document Foundation said that the LibreOffice 6.0 series is now ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. LibreOffice 6.0.6 continues this trend by offering mainstream users a more stable, reliable, and secure office suite that's ready to replace popular commercial alternatives.

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How LibreOffice’s quality has improved thanks to automated tools and the volunteer contribution of security specialists

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The Document Foundation celebrates five years of improvements to LibreOffice’s source code under Red Hat’s leadership, thanks to the adoption of automated tools such as Coverity Scan and Google OSS-Fuzz, and to the key contributions in the area of source code fuzzing of security specialists such as Antti Levomäki and Christian Jalio of Forcepoint.

“The combination of Coverity Scan, Google OSS-Fuzz and dedicated fuzzing by security specialists at Forcepoint has allowed us to catch bugs – which could have turned into security issues – before a release,” says Red Hat’s Caolán McNamara, a senior developer and the leader of the security team at LibreOffice.

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Oracle/Kernel/LibreOffice: DTrace, Linux, and LibreOffice 6.1 Schedule

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  • DTrace on Linux: an Update

    DTrace offers easy-but-powerful dynamic tracing of system behavior, and it is so lightweight and safe that it can routinely be used on production systems. DTrace was originally developed for the Oracle Solaris operating system.

  • Oracle Updates DTrace For Linux With ARM64 Support, Feature Updates

    At the beginning of the year Oracle reaffirmed their commitment for DTrace on Linux. For those still interested in using this dynamic tracing framework on Linux, Oracle has been rolling out a number of feature updates.

    Oracle has made a number of recent updates to the DTrace framework on Linux. Recent DTrace for Linux improvements include support for 64-bit ARM (ARM64 / AArch64), support for additional providers, bringing feature alignment with other DTrace implementations, compile-time array bounds checking, support for newer versions of the Linux kernel, PID provider support for user-space tracing, and various bug fixes.

  • LibreOffice 6.1 RC2 Released For Testing This Next Open-Source Office Suite Update

    LibreOffice 6.1 is planned for release by the middle of August but for that next version to happen without a hitch, the LibreOffice team could use a hand with the testing of their latest release candidates.

LibreOffice 6.1 On Track for Mid-August Release as Second RC Is Out for Testing

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Coming only two weeks after the first Release Candidate, LibreOffice 6.1 RC2 (Release Candidate 2) is here to fix more of those annoyances and bugs that might block the final release. A total of 84 bugs have been squashed across various components in LibreOffice 6.1 RC2 compared to the first Release Candidate.

While LibreOffice 6.1 is on track for its mid-August release, the development team still needs your help to test these Release Candidate versions and report any bugs or issues you may encounter, or just give positive feedback if everything works well for you during testing.

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LibreOffice With Microsoft DRM and a Tax

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Microsoft
Legal

LibreOffice and Plasma

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KDE
LibO

At KDAB, we know that consistency is an important aspect of the User Experience – users don’t want to have to learn different ways to achieve the same thing. In the Linux world, there is a major structural pitfall to this: the applications written for Linux come in at least two major technologies – Qt and GTK. Each of these frameworks deeply influences the experience the user has, and in different ways. As you’d expect, the frameworks have their own helper-dialogs e.g. to open or save a file or for printing. This can make it confusing for users, when the apps they use don’t show the same helper-dialogs for common actions.

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LibreOffice 6.1 Release Candidate Available Now for Final Bug Hunting Session

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Tomorrow, July 6, The Document Foundation plans to host the third and final bug hunting session for the LibreOffice 6.1 office suite, due for release in mid-August 2018. This bug hunting session is aimed at fixing last remaining issue against the Release Candidate milestone.

Those interested in joining the final bug hunting session to find, report and triage bugs can now download the first Release Candidate version of LibreOffice 6.1 for GNU/Linux as DEB and RPM packages, as well as for macOS and Microsoft Windows platforms.

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LibreOffice styles - My style is the bomb didi bom di deng

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LibreOffice styles management sure can benefit from improvements. All office suites can. Not only that, there are dozens of other areas where this free office suite could better itself. But to focus on the original question, styles in LibreOffice are different from Microsoft Office, but they work reasonably well.

There are some annoyances - selected text, the style and tab jumps on selection, and the lack of global export. On the other hand, you have the preview option, and the modify sub-menu is powerful and rather intuitive. Usable and reasonable. Now, that does not mean you should toss away your payware suite and go free. Not at all. The specific, individual needs are very delicate. Moreover, while LibreOffice has improved a lot, it's still not quite as powerful as Microsoft Office, and this is more evident in Calc and Impress, less so in Writer, which often gets most attention and care. But it is marching in the right direction, and if you're keen on doing documents right, you need to use styles. And when it comes to styles, LibreOffice 6.0 works fairly well. But the quest for perfection continues. So long and thanks for all the fonts.

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Checking out the notebookbar and other improvements in LibreOffice 6.0

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With any new openSUSE release, I am interested in the improvements that the big applications have made. One of these big applications is LibreOffice. Ever since LibreOffice has forked from OpenOffice.org, there has been a constant delivery of new features and new fixes every 6 months. openSUSE Leap 15 brought us the upgrade from LibreOffice 5.3.3 to LibreOffice 6.0.4. In this post, I will highlight the improvements that I found most newsworthy.

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Also: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Officially Released

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

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The Document Foundation informed Softpedia today about the general availability of the fifth point release of the LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite for all supported operating systems.

LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments.

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Direct: The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.0.5

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