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LibO

LibreOffice Now Has More Than 1000 Developers Working on It

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LibO

The LibreOffice project is one of the biggest open source endeavours in the world and The Document Foundation announced that there are now more than 1000 developers working on the office suite.

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ODF - the state of play - The future of ODF under OASIS, now that the standards war is won.

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OOo

ODF - open document format - is an open, XML-based rich document format that has been adopted as the standard for exchanging information in documents (spreadsheets, charts, presentations and word processing documents), by many governments and other organisations (see, for example, here), including the UK Government. This is despite strong opposition by Microsoft; but I have seen Microsoft's proposed "open XML" standard and, frankly, it is huge and horrid (in the word of standards, these go together). If I remember correctly, the early draft I saw even incorporated recognition of early Excel leap-year bugs into the standard.

ODF is now a pukka ISO standard, maintained by OASIS, under the proud banner: "The future is interoperability".

My personal thoughts, below, are prompted by an ODF session at ApacheCon Core titled "Beyond OpenOffice: The State of the ODF Ecosystem" held by Louis Suárez-Potts (community strategist for Age of Peers, his own consultancy, and the Community Manager for OpenOffice.org, from 2000 to 2011), and attended by very few delegates - perhaps a sign of current level of interest in ODF within the Apache community. Nevertheless, and I am talking about the ODF standard here, not Apache Open Office (which is currently my office software of choice) or its Libre Office fork (which seems to be where the excitement, such as it is, is, for now), the standards battle, or one battle, has been won; we have a useful Open Document Format, standardised by a recognised and mature standards organisation, and even Microsoft Office supports it. That's good.

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Better polygon rendering in LibreOffice's Gtk3 Support

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Above is how LibreOffice's "svp" backend rendered rotated text outlines in chart where the text is represented by polygon paths. Because the gtk3 backend is based on that svp backend that's what you got with the gtk3 support enabled.

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Editable version UK’s ODF guidance

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OOo

A free software advocate has created an editable version of the UK government’s Open Document Format manuals, the “ODF Guidance”. Making the texts available on the Github software development repository facilitates others to edit, update and translate the texts, explains Paolo Dongilli, uploaded the documents to Github on 28 October.

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The UK government embraces open source with the help of LibreOffice

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OSS

In a surprising turn of events (or not so surprising, depending upon your point of view), the UK has decided to adopt the open source "GovOffice" office suite (a fork of LibreOffice...sold and supported by Collabora Productivity). This deal is purported to serve in such a way as to compliment or replace existing solutions. Yet, last march UK's Cabinet Office shifted from MS Office to Google Apps (for over 2,000 users)...a clear sign they are done shelling out for MS Office licenses.

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Free software gains ground in the Italian public administration

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OSS

Italy's Ministry of Defence is pioneering the use of open-source office productivity tools with the migration of 150,000 PCs to LibreOffice

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Croatia publishes Linux & LibreOffice manual

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Linux

Croatia’s Ministry of Veterans has published a manual on how to use Linux and LibreOffice. The document is part of a feasibility pilot in the Ministry. “The text is intended for public administrations, but can be useful to others interested in using these tools”, the Ministry writes in its announcement on 5 November.

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Fedora Workstation 23 and LibreOffice

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Red Hat

Another major piece of engineering that I have covered that we did for Fedora Workstation 23 is the GTK3 port of LibreOffice. Those of you who follow Caolán McNamaras blog are probably aware of the details. The motivation for the port wasn’t improved look and feel integration, there was easier ways to achieve that, but to help us have LibreOffice deal well with a range of new technologies we are supporting in Fedora Workstation namely: Touch support, Wayland support and HiDPI.

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The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.0.3 “fresh” and LibreOffice 4.4.6 “still”

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LibO

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.0.3 “fresh”, the 4th release of the LibreOffice 5.0 family, and LibreOffice 4.4.6, the 7th release of the LibreOffice 4.4 family. So far, the LibreOffice 5.0 family is the most popular LibreOffice ever, based on feedback from journalists and end users.

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Also: LibreOffice 5.0.3 and LibreOffice 4.4.6 Officially Released

LibreOffice 5.1 to Start Twice as Fast, Has MS Office 2016 Interoperability

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The first major point release for LibreOffice, the 5.1 branch, is being worked on this weekend during the 1st Bug Hunting Session. This promises to be an important upgrade that should really make a difference.

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More in Tux Machines

Latvian Ventspils controls costs with open source

The administration of Ventspils, Latvia’s sixth largest city, is an avid user of free and open source software. The main benefits: cost and resource optimisation. Read more

Ubuntu Touch finds a home on a conflict-free, fair-trade, user-maintainable handset

Handset maker Fairphone is teaming up with the community project UBports, which seeks to get Ubuntu Touch on mobile devices. They will be showing off Ubuntu Touch running on the Fairphone 2 during Mobile World Congress, which starts February 27 in Barcelona. While Ubuntu is probably not the first name that comes to mind when you think of mobile devices, the phone in question offers some compelling features. “UBports Foundation will be showcasing its work at the Canonical booth, the company behind Ubuntu. Canonical is planning to tell about the latest developments around the convergence of its devices and UBports Foundation will share its mission ‘Ubuntu On Every Device’ with the visitors,” UBports said in a February 8 press release. Currently, UBports’ website lists three devices as “fully working as daily drivers:” The OnePlus One, Nexus 5, and the Fairphone 2, with the latter showing all parts as functioning with Ubuntu Touch, save the GPS radio. (Interestingly, the UBports project website for the Fairphone 2 still lists the GSM radio [in addition to the GPS] as a work in progress. However there is a video of two people talking with the handset, so it’s likely the Fairphone 2 project website is out of date.) The website also has instructions for flashing Ubuntu to the Fairphone 2. Read more

BSD Leftovers

  • LLVM/Clang 4.0 Is Running Late Due To Seven Blocker Bugs
    LLVM 4.0 was supposed to have been released by now, but it's running late due to open blocker bugs. Hans Wennborg commented on the mailing list that while the release should have happened on 21 February, serving as release manager, he hasn't tagged the release yet due to open blocker bugs.
  • FreeBSD-Based pfSense 2.3.3 Open-Source Firewall Released with over 100 Changes
    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle announced the availability of a new point release to the pfSense 2.3 stable series, which adds over 100 improvements and a bunch of new features. Updated to FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE-p16, the pfSense 2.3.3 maintenance release is here more than seven months after the 2.3.2 update and introduces several new packages, including TFTP Server, LCDproc, cellular, and tinc, a lot of improvements for the OpenVPN and IPsec implementations, as well as numerous stability and security fixes from FreeBSD. Dozens of bug fixes are included in pfSense 2.3.3 for WebGUI, graphs and monitoring, gateways and routing, notifications, Dynamic DNS, captive portal, NTP and GPS, DNS, resolver and forwarder, DHCP and DHCPv6 servers, router advertisements, HA and CARP, traffic shaping, firewall, rules, NAT, aliases, states, users, authentication, and privileges.
  • “Hi, I’m jkh and I’m a d**k”
    Yesterday, I was privy to a private email message discussing a topic I care deeply about. I contacted the author and said “You really need to make this public and give this a wider audience.” His response boiled down to “if I wanted it to get a wider audience, I was welcome to do so myself.” So here’s my first ever guest post, from Jordan K Hubbard, one of the founders of the FreeBSD Project. While this discussion focuses on FreeBSD, it’s applicable to any large open source project.

Linux Graphics