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LibreOffice: Extensions And Templates Website and LibOCon Almeria

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LibO
  • Expensive LibreOffice Extensions And Templates Website?

    I read a time ago about the myth of an expensive LibreOffice extensions and templates website. I investigated about this and had a look at the real numbers (they are public available on the wiki page: https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/TDF/Ledgers). I found some expenses only in two fiscal period: 2017 and 2018. TDF spent in 2017 6399.44 Euro and in 2018 642.60 Euro. The money was predominantly spent for content migration and an improved server environment. It included also an individual training for the TDF infrastructure team.

  • Announcing the dates of LibOCon Almeria

    LibreOffice Conference 2019 will be hosted by the Spanish city of Almeria during the month of September, from September 11 (Wednesday) to September 13 (Friday).

    On Tuesday, September 10, there will be the usual meetings of the community, to discuss topics of general interest for native language projects, such as localization, documentation, quality assurance, design and marketing.

    Collateral events such as the social dinner and the hackfest, which are a tradition of the LibreOffice Schedule, have not yet been scheduled.

LibreOffice Releases

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LibO
  • LibreOffice 6.2 Shipping Today With User Interface Improvements, Many New Features

    If Microsoft Office 2019 isn't your thing, The Document Foundation is today debuting LibreOffice 6.2 as the latest major release for this cross-platform, open-source office suite.

    LibreOffice 6.2 ships today with the optional new "tabbed" UI, the new "grouped-bar compact UI" is also available, there is better KDE/Qt5/LXQt integration, PDF importing enhancements, better PPT/PPTX import/export, support for OOXML agile encryption, native copy/paste support for spreadsheet data into Writer tables, HiDPI enhancements, and a heck of a lot of other changes.

  • LibreOffice 6.2 Officially Released with New NotebookBar UI, Many Improvements

    Six months in developmnt, the LibreOffice 6.2 office suite is now available for download and features a new user interface called NotebookBar, which is based on the MUFFIN concept and was previously an experimental feature. The NotebookBar UI is optional, not enabled by default, and comes in three different flavors, Tabbed, Grouped and Contextual.

    "The Tabbed variant aims to provide a familiar interface for users coming from proprietary office suites and is supposed to be used primarily without the sidebar, while the Grouped one allows to access “first-level” functions with one click and “second-level” functions with a maximum of two clicks," said The Document Foundation.

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

    LibreOffice 6.1.5 is now available, coming one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.1.4 point release, marking the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments as The Document Foundation considers the LibreOffice 6.1 series mature enough and thoroughly tested for production use.

    Until LibreOffice 6.1.4, the LibreOffice 6.1 series was only recommended to bleeding-edge and power users, but now The Document Foundation considers the office suite ready for deployment in organizations across a large number of computers starting with LibreOffice 6.1.5, which includes more than 70 bug fixes

LibreOffice 6.3 and Sifr

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LibO

Tomorrow LibreOffice 6.2 will be released. Time to give you some information what will come in LibreOffice 6.3.

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Security and Patches

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LibO
Security
Ubuntu
  • Recently patched Ubuntu needs another quick patch

    Sometimes when I fix things around my house I end up causing more problems. Software developers are the same way. Last week, Canonical's Ubuntu developers fixed over 10 security bugs in Ubuntu 18.04… But, as it turned out, it introduced at least two other bugs.

  • LibreOffice patches malicious code-execution bug, Apache OpenOffice – wait for it, wait for it – doesn't

    A security flaw affecting LibreOffice and Apache OpenOffice has been fixed in one of the two open-source office suites. The other still appears to be vulnerable.

    Before attempting to guess which app has yet to be patched, consider that Apache OpenOffice for years has struggled attract more contributors. And though the number of people adding code to the project has grown since last we checked, the project missed its recent January report to the Apache Foundation. The upshot is: security holes aren't being patched, it seems.

Microsoft Deleting Databases, Deprecating MSI and LibreOffice Developers Speak Out

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LibO
Microsoft
  • Forget snowmageddon, it's dropageddon in Azure SQL world: Microsoft accidentally deletes customer DBs

    The Azure outage of January 29 claimed some unexpected victims in the form of surprise database deletions for unlucky customers.

    The issue afflicted a number of Azure SQL databases that utilize custom KeyVault keys for Transparent Data Encryption (TDE), according to a message sent to users seen by The Register. Some internal code accidentally dropped these databases during Azure's portal wobble yesterday, forcing Microsoft to restore customer data from a five-minute-ago snapshot.

    That means transactions, product orders, and other updates to the data stores during that five-minute window were lost. That may warm you up with red-hot anger if you're in the middle of a particularly nasty cold snap.

    The note explained that the cockup happened automatically during what Redmond delicately called an network infrastructure event: a CenturyLink DNS snafu that locked essentially half of Microsoft 365 customers out of their cloud accounts, a breakdown that began at 1045 UTC.

  • Microsoft deprecates MSI

    Well – obviously. At least, their current actions tell that: they deprecated CRT MSMs (which is reiterated in VS 2019 RC2 release notes), a technology designed to allow MSI-based installers to install the CRT libraries in a centrally-managed manner; and the only recommended way now is using vcredist executable, which is not MSI-compatible.

    What else, if not deprecation, might it mean, when an installer technology made unable to deploy applications created using vendor’s own flagship development tool?

    Well – I thought: maybe that was an oversight? Why not inform them about the problem that MSI-only installers would be left without any viable option?

  • Improving SmartArt import in Impress FOSDEM talk

    The next step in the recent SmartArt story is my Improving SmartArt import in Impress talk at FOSDEM 2019, in the Open Document Editors devroom. The room was a bit far away from the popular places, but the livestream worked out nicely.

LibreOffice 6.2 RC3 is ready for testing

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The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 6.2 RC3 is ready for testing!

LibreOffice 6.2 will be released as final in a week from now and LibreOffice 6.2 RC3 represents the last pre-release before the final release since the development of version 6.2 started in mid May, 2018. See the release plan for more information.
You can find the list of bugs fixed in this pre-release here and the list of new features included in LibreOffice 6.2 in the release notes.

LibreOffice 6.2 RC3 is already available for downloaded in this link, for Linux, MacOS and Windows.

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The saga begins …

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Development
LibO

As you might have seen, we have now run four C++ sessions to get started with C++ and LibreOffice development. The origin of this actually happened already at the last LibreOffice Hackfest in Munich where Izabela, Mike, Anxhelo and me conspired on the idea. We also started to recruit LibreOffice developers as mentors right there and Xisco joined us soon.

As the lectures discuss the basics of data structures and C++ I started to create some patches against LibreOffice to show how to start with simple things in the LibreOffice build based on the examples from the lecture, but in the environment of LibreOffice and with some of its framework and conventions...

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Also: LibreOffice monthly recap: January 2019

LibreOffice 6.2 Slated for Release on February 7, Will Introduce a New Tabbed UI

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So the big news we want to share with you today is the LibreOffice 6.2 office suite will be officially released in about a week from the moment of writing this article, on Thursday, February 7, 2019. It will be available for all supported platforms, including Linux, Mac, and Windows.

As expected, we'll have a detailed story prepared on the LibreOffice 6.2 launch day to tell you all about its new features and improves, but, as a sneak peek, we'd like to inform you now that the upcoming release brings a new tabbed UI called Notebookbar, which you can see in action in the video and screenshot gallery below.

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LibreOffice Extensions and GNU Guile at FOSDEM

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GNU
LibO
  • What About A Review Of LibreOffice Extensions?

    I made a quick test with a currently published LibreOffice extension and it seemed there were no accurate review of the file before it and the project were published. Sad situation.

  • GNU Guile at FOSDEM

    GNU Guile will be present this year again at FOSDEM, which is just a few days away.

LibreOffice 6.2 Quality Assurance and LibreOffice on Chromebooks

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LibO
  • LibreOffice 6.2 community focus: Quality Assurance

    LibreOffice’s worldwide community of volunteers and certified developers has been working hard on the many updates in LibreOffice 6.2. But while shiny new features are great for users, it’s important that they’re well-tested too! That’s where our QA (Quality Assurance) community comes into play. So today we talk to Xisco Fauli, The Document Foundation’s QA engineer, about the upcoming release…

  • LibreOffice on Chromebooks

    Until recently, Chromebooks could browse the Web and run dedicated ChromeOS and Android applications, and that was that. But things are changing now since Google announced Crostini, a technology to run arbitrary Linux applications on ChromeOS.

    What you get, in short, is a Linux distribution running in a virtual machine. It is sandboxed, but with some channels set up between the virtual machine and the surrounding ChromeOS, so that e.g., icons of applications installed in the Linux VM show up in the ChromeOS launcher, and windows opened from within the VM are integrated with the overall ChromeOS desktop.

    The default Linux distribution provided by Google is a Debian 9, and one should be able to also plug other flavours of Linux, at least in theory. But we can install applications as flatpaks there, at which point the exact Linux distribution becomes rather irrelevant, anyway.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: mmap. Python and More

  • Making the Most of your Memory with mmap
    Sometimes it seems that we have nearly infinite memory resources, especially compared to the tiny 48K RAM of yesteryear’s 8-bit computers. But today’s complex applications can soak up megabytes before you know it. While it would be great if developers planned their memory management for all applications, thinking through a memory management strategy is crucial for applications with especially RAM intensive features like image/video processing, massive databases, and machine learning. How do you plan a memory management strategy? It’s very dependent on your application and its requirements, but a good start is to work with your operating system instead of against it. That’s where memory mapping comes in. mmap can make your application’s performance better while also improving its memory profile by letting you leverage the same virtual memory paging machinery that the OS itself relies on. Smart use of the memory mapping API (Qt, UNIX, Windows) allows you to transparently handle massive data sets, automatically paging them out of memory as needed – and it’s much better than you’re likely to manage with a roll-your-own memory management scheme. Here’s a real-life use case of how we used mmap to optimize RAM use in QiTissue, a medical image application. This application loads, merges, manipulates, and displays highly detailed microscope images that are up to gigabytes in size. It needs to be efficient or risks running out of memory even on desktops loaded with RAM.
  • Moving Kolla images to Python 3
    Python… To use 2.7 or to go for 3.x? To “be compatible” or to “use fancy new features”. Next year Python 2 gets finally unsupported upstream.
  • PyCharm 2019.1 RC 2
    New in PyCharm 2019.1: completely redesigned Jupyter Notebooks, improved HTML & CSS quick documentation, custom themes, and more. Get the release candidate from our website
  • 13 Project Ideas for Intermediate Python Developers
    Learning the basics of Python is a wonderful experience. But the euphoria of just learning can be replaced by the hunger for hands-on projects. It’s normal to want to build projects, hence the need for project ideas. The problem though is that some projects are either too simple for an intermediate Python developer or too hard. This article will suggest projects you can work on as an intermediate Python developer. These project ideas will provide the appropriate level of challenge for you.
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  • Microsoft buffs up its open-source halo to fine sheen with PostgreSQL GUI in Azure Data Studio [Ed: These are all proprietary software falsely marketed using "free bait" a.k.a. "open core" or 'open' plugins. It's also surveillance.]

DebConf20 Conference to Be Hosted in Haifa, Israel, for Debian GNU/Linux 11

A port city built in tiers, Haifa is found in the northern area of Israel, extending from the Mediterranean sea till the north slope of the Carmel Mountain National Park. Haifa it's the third-largest city in Israel after Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, and it is close to the biblical city Nazareth where Jesus studied and prayed. In 2020, the Debian Project will celebrate 12 years since the first DebConf Debian developer conference, so they decided to choose Israel instead of Lisbon, Portugal, for next year's DebConf20 event despite the extensive discussions between the DebConf team and committee due to Israel's political system. Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Debug ACPI DSDT and SSDT with ACPICA Utilities
    Using acpidbg on Ubuntu 18.04 x64 can be quite handy; however, the Linux kernel with ACPI_DEBUGGER is not always available, such as on Ubuntu for ARM. In such cases, acpica also provides a set of utilities, named acpica-tools, for ACPI debugging.
  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano is a $99 Computer Built for AI, Powered by Ubuntu
    Sold as a complete compute solution, the Jetson Nano Developer Kit wants to let embedded designers, researchers, and DIY makers harness the power of AI, all at an affordable price. A NVIDIA’s JetPack SDK provides a ‘complete desktop Linux environment based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS’, replete with accelerated graphics, NVIDIA CUDA toolkit support, and more. NVIDIA say developers will find it “easy” to install leading open-source Machine Learning (ML) frameworks like TensorFlow, Caffe and Keras. Frameworks for computer vision and robotics development like OpenCV and ROS are also available via the SDK. The JetPack 4.2 SDK [shipped on the microSD card] provides a complete desktop Linux environment for Jetson Nano based on Ubuntu 18.04 with accelerated graphics, support for NVIDIA CUDA Toolkit 10.0, and libraries such as cuDNN 7.3 and TensorRT 5,” Nvidia says of the nimble Nano dev kit. But how powerful is it?
  • Vertical rhythm and spacing in Vanilla Framework 2.0
    Vanilla, the CSS framework behind Canonical’s suite of products and services, has undergone significant changes over the last 12 months. We’ve introduced vertical rhythm, a new type scale, consistent white space in and between elements, and adjustable information density. 
  • Ubuntu 19 04 Desktop Tour of New Features

Security: Updates, Microsoft, Mirai, Reproducible Builds and PuTTY