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LibO

3 alternatives to LibreOffice Writer

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LibO

Even though I write for a living, I rarely use a word processor these days; I do most of my work in a text editor. When I do need to use a word processor, I turn to LibreOffice Writer. It's familiar, it's powerful, and it does everything that I need a word processor to do.

It's hard to dispute LibreOffice Writer's position at the top of the free and open source word processor food chain—both in popularity and in the number of features it has. That said, Writer isn't everyone's favorite word processor or their go-to application for writing.

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LibreOffice News

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LibO
  • LibreOffice leverages Google’s OSS-Fuzz to improve quality of office suite
  • LibreOffice leverages Google’s OSS-Fuzz to improve quality of office suite

    For the last five months, The Document Foundation has made use of OSS-Fuzz, Google’s effort to make open source software more secure and stable, to further improve the quality and reliability of LibreOffice’s source code. Developers have used the continuous and automated fuzzing process, which often catches issues just hours after they appear in the upstream code repository, to solve bugs – and potential security issues – before the next binary release.LibreOffice is the first free office suite in the marketplace to leverage Google’s OSS-Fuzz. The service, which is associated with other source code scanning tools such as Coverity, has been integrated into LibreOffice’s security processes – under Red Hat’s leadership – to significantly improve the quality of the source code.

  • Please participate in a survey about page margins

    Margins specify the amount of space to leave between the edges of the page and the document text. You can define it for the left/inner, right/outer, top and bottom side individually. Page margins are defined by default at 0.79″ respectively 2cm on each side in LibreOffice Writer (located under Format > Page). These default values are under close scrutiny now.

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.3.3

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LibO

The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.3.3, focused on bleeding edge features, and as such targeted at technology enthusiasts, early adopters, and power users. LibreOffice 5.3.3 integrates over 70 patches, with an update of the Sifr monochrome icon set and several fixes for interoperability with Microsoft Office documents.

For all other users and enterprise deployments, TDF suggests LibreOffice 5.2.7, with the backing of professional support by certified professionals

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LibreOffice 5.2.7 Is the Last in the Series, End of Life Set for June 4, 2017

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LibO

The Document Foundation announced a few moments ago the release of the seventh and last scheduled point release for the LibreOffice 5.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite.

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Announcement of LibreOffice 5.2.7

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LibO

The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.2.7, the seventh minor release of the LibreOffice 5.2 family, targeted to enterprises and individual users in production environments.

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Locked in by choice: why the city of Rome is championing open source software

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LibO
OOo

Five years after the European Union adopted a policy designed to free public bodies in Europe from proprietary software, government authorities across Europe are deeply dependent on Microsoft software and services.

However, some government agencies have managed to migrate to open source alternatives. Their projects are often difficult, temporary, and, carried out under the radar, in an attempt to escape lobbying both from Microsoft and other parts of government.

Rome is one of Europe’s cities advocating open source as a better alternative to Microsoft. City councilor, Flavia Marzano, argues that open source should start on the desktop with open source alternatives to Microsoft Office.

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Escuelas Linux 5.3 Is Out with LibreOffice 5.3.2 & OnlyOffice 4.3 Office Suites

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LibO
Linux

The developers of the educational-oriented Escuelas Linux operating system are informing Softpedia today, May 3, 2017, on the availability of the Escuelas Linux 5.3 release.

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LibreOffice crash reporting and Django bug fixing

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Development
LibO
  • LibreOffice crash reporting – An update

    Nearly a year ago I wrote a blog post describing the LibreOffice crash reporting setup and how the crash reporting code works. Since then we have released two minor versions with the crash reporter enabled (5.2 and 5.3) including many bug fix releases and release candidates. According to the crash reporting server a total of 27 versions are recognized and it is time to list some of the statistics surrounding the crash reporter.

  • Learn how to fix a Django bug from beginning to end

    For those who are starting to code and want to make open source software, sometimes starting is hard. The idea of contributing with that fancy and wonderful library that you love can sound a little bit scary. Lucky for us, many of those libraries have room for whoever is willing to start. They also give us the support that we need. Pretty sweet, right?

Nantes Métropole releases open source tool for LibreOffice transition

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LibO
OSS

The French city of Nantes (Nantes Métropole) has released an open source tool used to schedule its migration to LibreOffice. The shift from commercial software to the free and open source LibreOffice productivity suite started in 2013 and is intended to save the administration EUR 260 000 per year. The transition was finalised in April 2016.

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News about the migration to ODF in Taiwan

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LibO
OOo

The migration of ODF keeps going in many different fields in Taiwan. Since 2016 the Ministry of Education in Taiwan entrusts the Information Service Association of Chinese Colleges (ISAC) and Software Liberty Association Taiwan (SLAT) with the task of promoting and migrating ODF/LibreOffice in universities in Taiwan. Among all the university, National Chi-Nan University (NCNU) is the earliest one, which started migrating LibreOffice since 2014 and has been working on it for three years.

Then on April 20, 2017, a student from NCNU posted an article on Dcard forum saying that, according to her teacher, NCNU “Will not use Microsoft Office anymore due to the budget issue. LibreOffice will be used to replace Microsoft Office.” The student strongly questioned, “LibreOffice is totally unknown to everyone. I don’t know what the administrative staffs of our school are thinking about. Microsoft’s software is a very basic skill for enterprises to recruit people. This decision will make students lost their core competitiveness.”

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Fedora Classroom, Fedora Media Writer

  • Fedora Classroom Sessions are here!
    The Fedora Join SIG is proud to announce Classroom sessions. The Fedora Classroom is a project to teach interested users how to better use, understand and manage their Fedora system, and to show how the community works. The idea is to reach interested people and, if they desire, bring them closer to the Fedora community. Almost all classes will be held on IRC in the #fedora-classroom channel on Freenode (irc.freenode.net). If you’re not familiar with IRC, check out the Beginner’s guide to IRC. Also we’ll use BlueJeans, a video conferencing platform that works from browsers, mobile devices and a desktop application. If you have trouble connecting to Blue Jeans, please refer to the support page.
  • Fedora Media Writer – A Necessary Tool for the Fedora User
    Suppose that you have decided that you want to give the new Fedora release a try. You download the ISO and then you have to pick a method of putting that ISO on a thumb drive. You could choose to use the dd command or you could pick from a series of applications. However, with Fedora, you have only one option: Fedora Media Writer.

OpenSUSE 42.3

  • openSUSE 42.3 Released, Here’s What’s New
    After 8 months of continues development. The openSUSE team has just announced openSUSE 42.3. Which is considered to be the latest release of the stable openSUSE branch (called Leap).
  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux-based operating system is here -- download it now
    Variety is both a gift and curse for Linux on the desktop. On the one hand, it is nice that there are so many operating systems based on the kernel from which to choose. On the other, it can sometimes feel like the community is very fragmented. Not only is there tribalism between users of distributions, but desktop environments too. For instance, there is Ubuntu vs. Fedora and KDE vs. GNOME -- much like Coke vs. Pepsi and Chevy vs. Ford. This is just human nature, I suppose.

Software: mtPaint, Suricata, Gabedit, Mozilla, LibreOffice, and GNU Binutils

  • mtPaint – A Lightweight Paint Software for Digital Photos
    mtPaint is an open source paint application for both Linux and Windows developed for the purpose of creating and manipulating pixel images. It was developed from scratch by Mark Tyler and maintained by Dmitry Groshev. If you hadn’t heard about it prior to reading this article it is probably because before its latest update in June 2016, its last update was in 2011! Update frequency not withstanding, mtPaint has a focus on being memory friendly and its latest update came with a handful of both new and improved features.
  • Suricata 4.0 released!
    We are thrilled to announce Suricata 4.0. This is a major new release, improving detection capabilities, adding new output options and more protocols.
  • Suricata 4.0 released
  • Gabedit: the Portal to Chemistry
         Many chemistry software applications are available for doing scientific work on Linux. I've covered several here in previous issues of the magazine, and of them have their own peculiar specialties—areas where one may work better than another. So, depending on what your research entails, you may need to use multiple software packages to handle all of the work. This is where Gabedit will step in to help you out.
  • How Could You Use a Speech Interface?
    Last month in San Francisco, my colleagues at Mozilla took to the streets to collect samples of spoken English from passers-by. It was the kickoff of our Common Voice Project, an effort to build an open database of audio files that developers can use to train new speech-to-text (STT) applications. What’s the big deal about speech recognition? Speech is fast becoming a preferred way to interact with personal electronics like phones, computers, tablets and televisions. Anyone who’s ever had to type in a movie title using their TV’s remote control can attest to the convenience of a speech interface. According to one study, it’s three times faster to talk to your phone or computer than to type a search query into a screen interface. Plus, the number of speech-enabled devices is increasing daily, as Google Home, Amazon Echo and Apple HomePod gain traction in the market. Speech is also finding its way into multi-modal interfaces, in-car assistants, smart watches, lightbulbs, bicycles and thermostats. So speech interfaces are handy — and fast becoming ubiquitous.
  • LibreOffice 5.4 Released with ‘Significant New Features’
    LibreOffice 5.4 serves as the final major release in the LibreOffice 5.x series (meaning LibreOffice 6.x will be next). The update is said to add “significant new features in every module” and (as always) improved Microsoft Office file compatibility.
  • LibreOffice 5.4 released with new features for Writer, Calc and Impress
    The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.4, the last major release of the LibreOffice 5.x family, immediately available for Windows, macOS and Linux, and for the cloud. LibreOffice 5.4 adds significant new features in every module, including the usual large number of incremental improvements to Microsoft Office file compatibility.
  • GNU Binutils 2.29 Released
    Binutils 2.29 is now available as well as a Binutils 2.28.1 point release. Binutils 2.29 brings a lot for MIPS and SPARC users. MIPS improvements for Binutils 2.29 include support for microMIPS eXtended Physical Addressing (PXA), microMIPS Release 5 ISA for assembly/disassembly, support for the Imagination interAptiv MR2 CPU, and support for the MIPS16e2 ASE assembly/disassembly.
  • AMD Ryzen 3 Rolls Out, Linux Benchmarks Coming

GNOME/GTK: Nautilus, Evince, GNOME Calendar, GNOME Photos, Libratbag

  • Nautilus Not Adding Tags, Might Add File Favoriting Instead
    Tags are a super handy way to organize, sort and find files without needing to worry about where you actually put ’em. So, naturally, I was super excited when GNOME developer Alexandru Pandelea began to share word of work he’d done to bring native file tags to Nautilus.
  • After 12 Years, GNOME's Evince Document Viewer Supports Adobe Illustrator Files
    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera reports today on some the improvements coming to the Evince document viewer app as part of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment. The biggest change that'll be implemented in Evince 3.26 is the use of the libarchive library for decompressing various archive types, including the CBZ, CB7, and CBT formats that are usually used for comic books, and it also supports RAR files through the use of the unarr command-line utility.
  • GNOME Calendar is now capable of creating/editing recurring events
    I’m glad to announce that GNOME Calendar now supports creation of recurring events. Now you can easily create recurring events with the help of the modified edit-dialog.
  • Enhancing photos with GNOME Photos
    Photos can do more than edit. It also integrates with GNOME Online Accounts, and can be set up to share photos to various online photo services. Photos also lets you organize your photos into albums. It even detects screenshots and automatically sorts them into a Screenshots album for you!
  • Libratbag-Powered Piper Is Looking Good For Configuring Gaming Mice On Linux
    It's not quite ready for primetime yet by Linux gamers, but Piper as the GTK-powered user-interface for controlling gaming mice on Linux is getting into shape. Piper is the GTK interface for configuring mice on Linux via libratbag/ratbagd, the library offering a generic way to access various mice features and abstract away hardware/kernel differences.