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LibO

Comparing LibreOffice 6.2 Versions: AppImage, Flatpak, and Snap

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LibO

LibreOffice for GNU/Linux nowadays is available in 3 different universal formats, as alternative to the native format (DEB and RPM). This is an advancement that benefits us all greatly. Those 3 are AppImage, Flatpak, and Snap formats, sorted alphabetically. We, GNU/Linux users in many different distros, can obtain latest LibreOffice safely from one same source, by using one among these AFS methods. It is interesting for me to compare LibreOffice 6.2, the latest stable version now, by installation procedures, size, execution time, menubar, theme, access rights, and drag-and-drop. To make this comparison, I use Ubuntu 18.04 64-bit installed in Minimum Mode (without LibreOffice). I hope this comparison gives everybody good sight to both LibreOffice (the program) and AFS (the package formats).

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Events in America: Fedora 30 Release Party Mexico City and LibOCon Latinoamérica

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LibO
Red Hat
  • Fedora 30 Release Party Mexico City

    On May 23, 2019, the Fedora Community in Mexico City ran an awesome Fedora 30 Release Party. This activity took place in the local Red Hat office. We really appreciate the space for our activities and particularly thanks to Alex Callejas (darkaxl017) for doing all the necessary paperwork.

    We had three main activities: An amazing talk from Rolando Cedillo (@rolman) about KVM in Fedora, a Q&A session and our networking time with piz

  • LibOCon Latinoamérica – Asunción 2019, July 19 – 20

    A quick video inviting you to the LibreOffice Latin America Conference 2019! (English subtitles are available.) It will be held at the Facultad Politécnica de Universidad Nactional de Asunción (FPUNA) in Asunción, Paraguay on July 19th (Friday) and 20th (Sat). For more information about the conference please visit the website.

LibreOffice: DIY ot CIB With Support

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LibO
  • Start developing LibreOffice! Download the source code, and build on Linux

    In the previous part of this tutorial series, we showed how to register with Git and Gerrit, to prepare your setup for building LibreOffice and submitting patches.

    Today, we describe the steps you need to download and compile the LibreOffice source code on Linux. You can, of course, modify the source code you have downloaded and, if you compile it, you can make sure your changes are working well after the compilation.

    In this guide, we are using GNU/Linux distributions (typically Debian and Ubuntu-based distributions) with the apt package management frontend. Those who do not use these distributions need to run apt-get install and similar commands instead.

  • German Company Offers LibreOffice Based Enterprise Grade Alternative To Microsoft Office 365

    CIB, a German maker of powerful standard applications for document management, has chosen LibreOffice to power its enterprise suite of document management solutions.

    CIB is one of the largest contributors to LibreOffice development, with a global multilingual team with decades of hacking and consulting experience on the code base and the product.

LibreOffice on GNU/Linux and New Site

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GNU
LibO
Linux
  • LibreOffice 6.3 on Linux, a statement

    Following the availability of LibreOffice 6.3 Beta, there have been speculations about 32-bit compatibility based on a the missing 32-bit binaries for Linux.

    We have prepared a short and a long statement to clarify the situation.

  • Announcing a new website: What can I do for LibreOffice!

    Here at The Document Foundation, we’re always encouraging people to join our projects and community. Contributing to a well-known open source project is a great way to meet new people, have fun, build up skills and experience, and help to make the world a better place!

    However, large FOSS projects can be daunting too. Our Get involved page aims to make the on-boarding process for newcomers easier, by breaking the process down into smaller steps, and we plan other improvements to that page.

Software: Abricotine, Curl, LibreOffice and Proprietary Traps

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LibO
Software

Free/Libre:

  • Excellent Utilities: Abricotine – open source Markdown editor

    This is a new series of reviews highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’re covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. For this article, we’ll put Abricotine under the spotlight.

    Abricotine is an open source, cross-platform Markdown editor built for the desktop with inline preview functionality. Let’s recap about Markdown.

    Markdown is a plain text formatting syntax created by John Gruber in 2004. It’s designed to be easy-to-read and easy-to-write.

    Readability is at the very heart of Markdown. It offers the advantages of plain text, provides a convenient format for writing for the web, but it’s not intended to be a replacement for HTML. Markdown is a writing format, not a publishing format. You control the display of the document; formatting words as bold or italic, adding images, and creating lists are just a few of the things we can do with Markdown. Mostly, Markdown is just regular text with a few non-alphabetic characters included, such as # or *.

    Markdown has a much more basic syntax than HTML, leaving aside things like opening and closing tags, and instead uses punctuation and characters that all users will already use in daily writing. The punctuation characters have been carefully chosen to resemble what they mean. The intention is to ensure that the syntax does not stop the flow of writing, allowing the author to focus on content, rather than how it looks. In this way, Markdown shares a common bond with LaTeX, a document preparation system for high quality typesetting, which also encourages authors not to focus too much on the appearance, but to concentrate on the right content.

  • curl 7.65.1 patched up and ready to go

    We worked hard on fixing bugs in the weeks before we shipped curl 7.65.0. We really did. Yet, several annoying glitches managed to creep in, remain unnoticed and cause problems to users when they first eagerly tried out the new release. Those were glitches that none in the development team had experienced or discovered but only took a few hours for users to detect and report.

    The initial bad sign was that it didn’t even take a full hour from the release announcement until the first bug on 7.65.0 was reported. And it didn’t stop with that issue. We obviously had a whole handful of small bugs that caused friction to users who just wanted to get the latest curl to play with. The bugs were significant and notable enough that I quickly decided we should patch them up and release an update that has them fixed: 7.65.1. So here it is!

    This patch release even got delayed. Just the day before the release we started seeing weird crashes in one of the CI builds on macOS and they still remained on the morning of the release. That made me take the unusual call to postpone the release until we better understood what was going on. That’s the reason why this comes 14 days after 7.65.0 instead of a mere 7 days.

  • Some Of The Best Windows Emulators For Linux

    Let’s look into the list of some of the useful and best Windows emulators for Linux based operating systems.

  • LibreOffice 6.3 hits beta, with built-in redaction tool for sharing those █████ documents

    The Document Foundation has released the first beta of LibreOffice 6.3, with new features including a redaction tool and a Fourier Analysis spreadsheet function.

    LibreOffice was forked from OpenOffice in 2010, which is when The Document Foundation was formed, including a team of OpenOffice contributors. OpenOffice has also continued and is now Apache OpenOffice. The default format of both suites is OpenDocument, an ISO standard.

    Version 6.3 is planned for full release in mid August. There are new features of which the most notable is the built-in redaction tool. Existing proprietary tools do not support open document formats, the release notes explained.

    The new tool works by converting the target document to a LibreOffice drawing. You then blank out parts of the document by placing shapes over the offending words. Finally, the redaction tool offers a "Redacted Export" option, which creates a PDF in which the document becomes a bitmap with no selectable text.

  • QA Report: May 2019
  • Month of LibreOffice, May 2019: The winners!

Proprietary:

  • Apple will soon kill off iTunes and, with it, an entire era of music history

     

    iTunes—a program for managing your media library, listening to songs, and buying new content—played a key part in the digital revolution of the 2000s after it first launched in 2001. Its impact started with music. iTunes was partly credited with slowing the severe bleeding to piracy the recording industry faced amid the popularity of the MP3 boom on peer-to-peer file-sharing applications like Napster. And the program was also the home base for the iPod, one of the first of many products CEO Steve Jobs oversaw when steering the company back to success after he returned to his leadership position in 1998.

  • Google Chrome 75 Released with Minor Improvements And 42 Security Fixes

    Google Chrome team has released Chrome 75 (75.0.3770.80) on June 4, 2019.

    Chrome 75 stable channel was released for Windows, Mac, Linux and Android.

    This release contains a number of fixes (42 Security Fixes) and few minor improvements.

    There’s an experimental reader mode available via the chrome://flags page.

  • Google Chrome 75 released with secret Reader Mode

    Google has released today version 75 of its Chrome browser, available for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.

LibreOffice 6.3 Enters Beta Testing, Drops Support for 32-Bit Linux Distros

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LibO

The third major instalment in the LibreOffice 6 series, LibreOffice 6.3 is coming this summer with another layer of performance improvements, as well as cool new features and enhancements. Development on LibreOffice 6.3 kicked off last November, and the first beta version is now ready for public testing for Linux, macOS, and Windows.

"LibreOffice 6.3 will be released as final in mid-August 2019, being LibreOffice 6.3 Beta 1 the second pre-release since the development of version 6.3 started in mid-November 2018," reads the announcement. "Since LibreOffice 6.3 Alpha 1, 683 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 141 bugs have been set to FIXED in Bugzilla."

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Also: LibreOffice 6.3 Beta1 ready for testing

LibreOffice 6.3 Alpha1 Run-Through and Developing LibreOffice

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LibO
  • LibreOffice 6.3 Alpha1 Run Through

    In this video, we look at LibreOffice 6.3 Alpha 1. Enjoy!

  • Start developing LibreOffice! Registering with Git and Gerrit, and local settings
  • LibreOffice 6.3 Beta1 ready for testing

    The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 6.3 Beta1 is ready for testing!

    LibreOffice 6.3 will be released as final in mid August, 2019, being LibreOffice 6.3 Beta1 the second pre-release since the development of version 6.3 started in mid November, 2018 ( See the release plan ). Since LibreOffice 6.3 Alpha1, 683 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 141 bugs have been set to FIXED in Bugzilla. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

    LibreOffice 6.3 Beta1 can be downloaded from here, it’s available for Linux, MacOS and Windows. Besides, and it can be installed along with your actual installation.

Writing in Style With LibreOffice

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LibO

One of the most attractive aspects of FOSS is that it encourages self-reliance. Where Window users are discouraged from trying to solve problems with their system, FOSS users learn to research online, and then tinker until they find a solution. In many cases, all they need to do is edit a heavily commented text file to change the configuration. However, when I was writing “Designing with LibreOffice” a few years ago, I found one exception to this do-it-yourself tradition: FOSS users are no better than anyone else at learning how to use a word processor. Although the structure of word processors is now decades old, even today relatively few know how to take full advantage of that structure.

At least two out of three users, in my estimation, approach a word processor as though it were a typewriter, never learning how to use it efficiently. Of course, if you want to work the hard way, there’s nothing wrong with that. Everyone is perfectly free to do things the hard way. I have actually heard people insist on their right to work inefficiently.

Yet, as Robin Williams emphasizes in the title of a book, “A PC Is Not A Typewriter”, and it is especially unexpected that, in this one case, the hands-on approach of the majority of FOSS users deserts them.

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Best free Microsoft Office alternative software

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LibO
OOo

Thanks to the Open Document Format, you can easily access all files and edit and save them with no hassle.

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Events: Linux Plumbers, SUSE in Germany and LibreOffice Paris HackFest

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LibO
Linux
SUSE
  • Linux Plumbers Earlybird Registration Quota Reached, Regular Registration Opens 30 June

    A few days ago we added more capacity to the earlybird registration quota, but that too has now filled up, so your next opportunity to register for Plumbers will be Regular Registration on 30 June … or alternatively the call for presentations to the refereed track is still open and accepted talks will get a free pass.

  • Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations and Cloud Strategies Conference Frankfurt 2019

    In a week’s time, team SUSE will be heading to Frankfurt, Germany for this year’s Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations and Cloud Strategies Conference. Hundreds of attendees from all around Europe will be paying Kap Europa Congress Centre in Frankfurt a visit – to network, speak to exhibitors, pick up valuable nuggets of information from the Gartner analysts, attend sessions to learn more about the latest happenings in IT infrastructure and operations and enjoy all that the beautiful city of Frankfurt has to offer.

  • LibreOffice Paris HackFest

    The LibreOffice Paris HackFest 2019 will take place on the weekend of July 5th-6th, at le 137, which is at 137 Boulevard Magenta, Paris 10e, France. The event is sponsored by INNO3, hosting the hackfest in their building, and The Document Foundation, providing reimbursement for travels and accommodations.

    LibreOffice Paris HackFest will start on Friday at 10AM. During the day there will be an informal meeting of the French community, to discuss local activities, while developers and other volunteers will hack the LibreOffice code. The venue will be available until 2AM. On Saturday the venue will open at 10AM, to allow people to continue working, and share hackfest results. The event will officially end at 8PM, but on Sunday there will be a city tour.

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9 Best Free Linux Biology Tools

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