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Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: LibreOffice, Pi, Zorin OS, CentOS 8 EoL, mintCast and More

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GNU
LibO
Linux
  • Ten more videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2021 - The Document Foundation Blog

    Here are some more videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2021! Check out the playlist, using the button in the top-right – or scroll down for links to individual videos:

  • Pi for the People | LINUX Unplugged 428

    We try out POP!_OS on the Raspberry Pi 4, and chat with its creator Jeremy Soller from System76.

    Plus our thoughts on the perfect Linux laptop right now, and the clever initiative Valve just launched for the Deck.

    Special Guests: Jack Aboutboul, Jeremy Soller, and Neal Gompa.

  • 20 Things You MUST DO After Installing Zorin OS 16 (Right Now!) - Invidious

    In this video, I’ll be taking you through 20 things that’ll make your computer Perform Better (Preload), your Internet Speed Faster (custom DNS) and so many more improvements.

  • CentOS 8 End of Life - Are you Ready? My thoughts & Suggestions - Invidious

    CentOS 8 will reach its end of life very soon - after December 31st, there will be no more updates for the popular distribution. If you're using CentOS 8 in your data center, it's time to make a decision. In this video, I'll go over my thoughts about the subject, as well as some possible options for how to proceed.

  • mintCast 372 – Ryzen Sun

    1:44 The News
    18:21 Security Update
    21:43 Bi-Weekly Wanderings
    56:20 Announcements & Outro

    First up in the news Pinephone Pro, KDE’s 5.23 on their 25th, Ubuntu Frame, Windows 11 Ryzen slowdowns, and Nvidia updates

    In security Retpolines patches for performance and Azure Linux boot failures

    Then in our Wandering, Joe has some Pi, Norbert edits video, Tony Updates a BIOS, and Nishant upgrades Fedora

  • The Diablo is in the Details | Coder Radio 436

    Why mastering your development environment can be a tricky feat, and a server outage brought to you by the late 1990s.

Announcing the election for the next TDF Board of Directors

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LibO

On October 18, we officially announced the upcoming election for the next Board of Directors of The Document Foundation, the non-profit entity behind LibreOffice.

As per § 7 II of our statutes (binding German version and non-binding English translartion) the Board’s term lasts two years. The current Board started its duty on February 18, 2020. Therefore, the old Board remains in charge until the end of February 17, 2022, so the new Board will be in charge the day after that, which is February 18, 2022.

That upcoming term will then (regularly) end on February 17, 2024, so the next election of the Board of Directors will take place before.

As per § 6 III, only members of the Board of Trustees of The Document Foundation, as well as current members of any of its bodies, are eligible to be elected into the Board of Directors, and the election is prepared and supervised by the Membership Committee (§ 7 II).

Read more

Results from the Survey about LibreOffice Calc

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LibO

Earlier this year we run a survey on LibreOffice Calc. It was inspired by a similar questionnaire for LibreOffice Draw (see first and second blog post). The Calc survey was used to learn about how Calc is being used, what features are most important to users and where they expect to see the improvements to the software. The work was done by Maria Berg, thanks a lot for your contribution.

This blog post shows some results in detail. You may also watch the recording of the presentation at the LibreOffice conference at http:// (link will be added later)

In total 1797 people started the survey and 1229 completed all questions. Many thanks to everyone!

We started with a couple of demographic questions that demonstrated the limits of online surveys: most participants were middle age (65% between 33 and 65 years old), technology-affine (60% use Linux as operating system), and power users (45% run the application every day). We advertised the survey on our blog and social media such as Twitter (you may also follow the design team), Reddit, and Facebook. And while LibreOffice has roughly 200 millions users, most of those who are following us are technology enthusiastic.

Read more

LibreOffice Leftovers

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LibO
  • Michael Meeks/2021-10-15 Friday

    After Italo's keynote announcement of the new LibreOffice Technology marketing plan at the LibreOffice conference, we lost no time integrating this great way to fairly present the goodness of LibreOffice that we depend on to build Collabora Online & Collabora Office mobile into the product. With new links that can take you to our LibreOffice Technology page where we can celebrate the community & credit all the hard work done under the hood here, and of course the logo. Still a work-in-progress, and will start to appear in our products over the next weeks as/when we refresh them, but so far it looks like this for desktop & mobile

    [...]

    up-coming COOL About dialog up-coming COOL About dialog
    Thanks to Italo & Mike at TDF for developing the concept, and also to Pedro & Elisa, for their work on the code & logos - we'll be iterating it with them over the next days & weeks.

  • Let's do awesome things! Get support for your projects and ideas from our budget - The Document Foundation Blog

    Want to organise a local (or online) LibreOffice event? Need some merchandise to boost your project or community? Then we can help you! The Document Foundation, the non-profit behind LibreOffice, is backed by contributions from ecosystem members and volunteers, as well as donations from end-users. This helps us to maintain TDF, but we can do a lot more too. And next year, we want to do a lot of projects again!

  • Next batch of videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2021 - The Document Foundation Blog

    Here are some more videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2021! Check out the playlist, using the button in the top-right – or scroll down for links to individual videos...

  • Automated bibisect to find source of a bug - LibreOffice Development Blog

    In programming, we usually face bugs that we should fix to maintain or improve our software. In order to fix a bug, first we should find the source of the problem, and there are tools like “Automated bibisect” are available to help, specially when the bug is a regression.

LibreOffice 7.2.2 for Slackware-current is available

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LibO
Slack

LibreOffice Community Edition 7.2.2 was released yesterday and I have uploaded a new set packages for Slackware-current.

The document conversion libraries have been split off and made available via the Document Liberation Project : documentliberation.org . It is the home for a growing community of developers ‘united to free users from vendor lock-in of content‘. Software like Calligra, Inkscape and Scribus also make good use of the document format conversion capabilities these libraries offer.

Read more

LibreOffice 7.2.2 Community Released with 68 Bug Fixes, Update Now

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LibO
Linux
News

The LibreOffice 7.2 office suite was released in mid-August 2021 with many new features and improvements for all of its core components, including Writer, Calc, Impress & Draw, Math, and Chart, native support for Apple M1 machines, as well as improved interoperability with the MS Office document formats.

LibreOffice 7.2.2 is here about a month after the LibreOffice 7.2.1 point release to fix even more bugs and security issues. According to the RC1 and RC2 changelogs, there are a total of 68 bug fixes, so you should update your installations as soon as possible.

Read more

Hossein Nourikhah, Developer Community Architect, Sets Up a New LibreOffice Development Blog

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Development
LibO
  • Check out the new LibreOffice Development Blog!

    Here on The Document Foundation’s blog, we post about general news and activities in the LibreOffice world. But now we have a dedicated development blog, set up by Hossein Nourikhah, who recently joined us as a Developer Community Architect.

  • LibreOffice Development blog has started! - LibreOffice Development Blog

    To know more about what is going on in LibreOffice, you can refer to the main Document Foundation blog. Also, if you want to learn more about the LibreOffice design, you can refer to the LibreOffice Design Team blog. And now, we have created a new blog, dedicated to the LibreOffice development!

  • Getting Started (Video Tutorial) - LibreOffice Development Blog

    LibreOffice development starts with setting up a development environment. After that, you can do the development in your favorite IDE. In this 80 minutes presentation, you will find everything you need to know to get started with LibreOffice development; from installing dependencies using distribution tools, LODE (LibreOffice Development Environment) or manual setup to compilation itself.

    With this tutorial, you can build LibreOffice for yourself. Then we look at some simple tasks from LibreOffice EasyHacks. After that, you can try to get your submission merged into the LibreOffice code by submitting it to gerrit, and doing the fixes requested by the reviewers.

LibreOffice on Chromebooks and Apache/OpenOffice

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LibO
OOo
  • How to install LibreOffice 7.2 on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install LibreOffice 7.2 on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

    If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

  • Apache Month in Review: September 2021

    Welcome to the latest monthly overview of events from the Apache community. Here's a summary of what happened in September [video highlights available]...

  • This Week In Security: OpenOffice Vulnerable, IOS Vulnerable, Outlook… You Get The Idea | Hackaday

    We start this week with a good write-up by [Eugene Lim] on getting started on vulnerability hunting, and news of a problem in OpenOffice’s handling of DBase files. [Lim] decided to concentrate on a file format, and picked the venerable dbase format, .dbf. This database format was eventually used all over the place, and is still supported in Microsoft Office, Libreoffice, and OpenOffice. He put together a fuzzing approach using Peach Fuzzer, and found a handful of possible vulnerabilities in the file format, by testing a very simple file viewer that supported the format. He managed to achieve code execution in dbfview, but that wasn’t enough.

    Armed with a vulnerability in one application, [Lim] turned his attention to OpenOffice. He knew exactly what he was looking for, and found vulnerable code right away. A buffer is allocated based on the specified data type, but data is copied into this buffer with a different length, also specified in the dbase file. Simple buffer overflow. Turning this into an actual RCE exploit took a bit of doing, but is possible. The disclosure didn’t include a full PoC, but will likely be reverse engineered shortly.

    Normally we’d wrap by telling you to go get the update, but OpenOffice doesn’t have a stable release with this fix in it. There is a release candidate that does contain the fix, but every stable install of OpenOffice in the world is currently vulnerable to this RCE. The vulnerability report was sent way back on May 4th, over 90 days before full disclosure. And what about LibreOffice, the fork of OpenOffice? Surely it is also vulnerable? Nope. LibreOffice fixed this in routine code maintenance back in 2014. The truth of the matter is that when the two projects forked, the programmers who really understood the codebase went to LibreOffice, and OpenOffice has had a severe programmer shortage ever since. I’ve said it before: Use LibreOffice, OpenOffice is known to be unsafe.

  • All Your (d)Base Are Belong To Us, Part 1: Code Execution in Apache OpenOffice (CVE-2021–33035) [Ed: How many still use OpenOffice instead of LibreOffice]

    Venturing out into the wilderness of vulnerability research can be a daunting task. Coming from a background in primarily web and application security, I had to shift my hacking mindset towards memory corruption vulnerabilities and local attack vectors. This two-part series will share how I got started in vulnerability research by discovering and exploiting code execution zero-days in office applications used by hundreds of millions of people. I will outline my approach to getting started in vulnerability research including dumb fuzzing, coverage-guided fuzzing, reverse engineering, and source code review. I will also discuss some management aspects of vulnerability research such as CVE assignment and responsible disclosure.

LibreOffice Lands Initial Code For Qt6 Toolkit Support

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LibO

Merged this morning into the LibreOffice code-base is the initial Qt6 VCL plug-in.

LibreOffice supports multiple Visual Class Library (VCL) plug-ins for different toolkits from the Windows and macOS Quartz user-interface back-ends to the GTK and Qt5 back-ends and more for supporting different user-interface implementations depending upon the platform. Complementing the LibreOffice Qt5 VCL is now an early, work-in-progress Qt6 VCL.

Read more

Also: Start of list level support in Writer paragraph styles

Events: Debian Reunion Hamburg 2021 and LibreOffice Conference 2021

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LibO
Debian
  • Debian Reunion Hamburg 2021, klein aber fein

    So the Debian Reunion Hamburg 2021 has been going on for not yet 48h now and it appears people are having fun, enjoying discussions between fellow Debian people and getting some stuff done as well. I guess I'll write some more about it once the event is over...

  • LibreOffice Conference 2021: Opening session

    Here’s the opening session from last week’s LibreOffice Conference 2021!

    More sessions to come, plus a playlist and PeerTube alternatives…

    Please confirm that you want to play a YouTube video. By accepting, you will be accessing content from YouTube, a service provided by an external third party.

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More in Tux Machines

Pumpkins, markets, and one bad Apple

Imagine your local farmers market: every Saturday the whole town comes together to purchase fresh and homemade goods, enjoy the entertainment, and find that there is always something for everyone. Whatever you need, you can find it here, and anyone can sign up to have their own little stand. It is a wonderful place, or so it seems. Now, imagine starting out as a pumpkin farmer, and you want to sell your pumpkins at this market. The market owner asks 30% of every pumpkin that you sell. It's steep, but the market owner -- we'll call him Mr. Apple -- owns all the markets in your area, so you have little choice. Let's continue this analogy and imagine that, since it is a little hard for you to make ends meet, you decide to tell your customers that they can come visit you at your farm to purchase pumpkins. Mr. Apple overhears and shuts your stand down. You explain that your business cannot be profitable this way, but the grumpy market owner says that you can either comply or find another place. At the end of your rope, you look for information about starting your own farmers market, but it seems Mr. Apple owns every building in town. In the midst of Apple announcing its new products, attention is drawn away from its ongoing battle to maintain its subjugation over users globally. The Netherlands’ Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM) last month informed the U.S. technology giant of its decision that the rules around the in-app payment system are anticompetitive, making it the first antitrust regulator to conclude that the company has abused market power in the App Store. And while Apple is appealing this verdict, the European Union is charging the company with another antitrust claim concerning the App Store. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install PostgreSQL 14 on Ubuntu 20.04 - howtodojo

    In this tutorial, we learn how to install PostgreSQL 14 on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). PostgreSQL, or usually called Postgres, is an open-source object-relational database management system (ORDBMS) with an emphasis on extensibility and standards compliance. PostgreSQL is ACID-compliant and transactional. It is developed by PostgreSQL Global Development Group (PGDG) that consists of many companies and individual contributors. PostgreSQL released under the terms of PostgreSQL license.

  • How to Install Minikube on CentOS 8 - Unixcop

    Minikube is open source software for setting up a single-node Kubernetes cluster on your local machine. The software starts up a virtual machine and runs a Kubernetes cluster inside of it, allowing you to test in a Kubernetes environment locally. Minikube is a tool that runs a single-node Kubernetes cluster in a virtual machine on your laptop. In this tutorial we will show you how to install Minikube on CentOS 8.

  • How to Install and Secure Redis on Ubuntu 20.04 | RoseHosting

    Redis (short for Remote Dictionary Server), is an open-source in-memory data structure store. It’s used as a flexible, highly available key-value database that maintains a high level of performance. It helps to reduce time delays and increase the performance of your application by accessing in microseconds.

  • How to Upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 - OMG! Ubuntu!

    If the glowing reviews for the Ubuntu 21.10 release have you intrigued, here’s how to upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 from an earlier version. Fair warning: this tutorial is super straightforward (the benefits of upgrading after a stable release, rather than a little bit before). Meaning no, you don’t need to be a Linux guru to get going! There are plenty of good reasons to upgrade from Ubuntu 21.04 to Ubuntu 21.10, such as benefiting from a newer Linux kernel, enjoying a new GNOME desktop, sampling the new Yaru Light theme, and getting to go hands-on with an able assortment of updated apps.

  • How to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4 - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at how to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4. Enjoy!

  • Jenkins: How to add a JDK version - Anto ./ Online

    This guide will show you how to add a JDK version to Jenkins. If you plan to run a Java build requiring a specific version of the Java Development Kit, you need to do this.

  • Sending EmailsSend them from Linux Terminal? | Linux Journal

    Does your job require sending a lot of emails on a daily basis? And you often wonder if or how you can send email messages from the Linux terminal. This article explains about 6 different ways of sending emails using the Linux terminal. Let’s go through them.

Development version: GIMP 2.99.8 Released

GIMP 2.99.8 is our new development version, once again coming with a huge set of improvements. Read more Some early coverage:

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released with Clone Tool Tweaks, Support for Windows Ink

    A new development version of GIMP is available to download and it carries some interesting new features. While this isn’t a new stable release — GIMP 2.10.28 is the most recent stable release (and the version you’ll find in Ubuntu 21.10’s archives) — the release of GIMP 2.99.8 is yet another brick in the road to the long-fabled GIMP 3.0 release. And it’s a fairly substantial brick, at that.

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released As Another Step Toward The Long Overdue GIMP 3.0

    GIMP 3.0 as the GTK3 port of this open-source Adobe Photoshop alternative has been talked about for nearly a decade now and the work remains ongoing. However, out today is GIMP 2.99.8 as the newest development snapshot.

Mozilla: Six-Year Moziversary, Thomas Park/Codepip, and Weak Response to Critics of Firefox Spyware

  • Chris H-C: Six-Year Moziversary

    I’ve been working at Mozilla for six years today. Wow. Okay, so what’s happened… I’ve been promoted to Staff Software Engineer. Georg and I’d been working on that before he left, and then, well *gestures at everything*. This means it doesn’t really _feel_ that different to be a Staff instead of a Senior since I’ve been operating at the latter level for over a year now, but the it’s nice that the title caught up. Next stop: well, actually, I think Staff’s a good place for now. Firefox On Glean did indeed take my entire 2020 at work, and did complete on time and on budget. Glean is now available to be used in Firefox Desktop.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Hacks Decoded: Thomas Park, Founder of Codepip

    Thomas Park is a software developer based in the U.S. (Philadelphia, specifically). Previously, he was a teacher and researcher at Drexel University and even worked at Mozilla Foundation for a stint. Now, he’s the founder of Codepip, a platform that offers games that teach players how to code. Park has made a couple games himself: Flexbox Froggy and Grid Garden.

  • Mark Surman: Exploring better data stewardship at Mozilla [Ed: Mozilla fails to admit that spying on Firefox users is wrong; now it's misframing the criticism and responds to a straw man]

    Over the last few years, Mozilla has increasingly turned its attention to the question of ‘how we build more trustworthy AI?’ Data is at the core of this question. Who has our data? What are they using it for? Do they have my interests in mind, or only their own? Do I trust them? We decided earlier this year that ‘better data stewardship’ should be one of the three big areas of focus for our trustworthy AI work. One part of this focus is supporting the growing field of people working on data trusts, data cooperatives and other efforts to build trust and shift power dynamics around data. In partnership with Luminate and Siegel, we launched the Mozilla Data Futures Lab in March as a way to drive this part of the work.