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GIMP

A free photo editor worth trying: Getting started with GIMP

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GNU
GIMP

When most of us are looking for a photo-editing tool, we immediately think of Photoshop. Adobe’s program is powerful and popular, but it’s pricey at $100—and that's for the “light” version called Photoshop Elements.

Meanwhile, $20 per month is the standard charge for individual one-app subscriptions to Photoshop Creative Cloud. Adobe offers a free in-browser version called Photoshop Express Editor, but it’s very limited and only allows you to edit JPEG files.

A better free alternative is to turn to the open-source world and a popular program called GIMP. The GNU Image Manipulation Program is the standard photo-editing tool included or available to most Linux distributions. GIMP is also available for Windows (XP and up) and Mac.

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GIMP On TV

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GNU
GIMP

I was watching an issue of CNN’s “Forensic Files” early this morning when I was surprised to see GIMP on TV. A murder had been committed and the local anthropologist lacked software to compare a skull with a portrait to verify the identity of the victim. A local computer guru was able to use GIMP to compare photographs of the skull with the portrait. That set the police on a course towards solving the crime. It turned out the truck driver did it. DNA from a tooth compared to some surgical evidence confirmed GIMP’s conclusions.

What was interesting is that Forensic Files mentioned that GIMP was available to anyone for a $free download. I liked that. The software licence, GPL, described in generic terms the public can understand got out there.

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GIMP free alternative to subscription model Photoshop updated

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GIMP

That would be the oddly-named GIMP (acronym for: GNU Image Manipulation Program), an open source, high-end image editing and creation alternative to Adobe’s Photoshop and its now open-ended, monthly wallet-siphoning distribution mode for tasks like photo retouching, image editing and composition, and image authoring.

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You Say GIMP Was Right

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GIMP

The split was the result of GIMP’s concern over policies at SourceForge, primarily SourceForge’s use of DevShare, an installer for Windows that bundles third party software offers with FOSS downloads. In addition, the GIMP folks had reservations about potentially deceptive “download here” buttons on ads being served by the likes of Google’s AdSense.

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GIMP Still Has Many Lofty Features To Develop

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GIMP

For those that may have extra time this holiday season to devote to open-source tasks, the GIMP graphics program still has many features they're after and aren't yet up to their v2.10 release.

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GIMP Magazine #4 is out!

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GIMP

gimpusers.com: Celebrate one year of GIMP Magazine! Issue#4 offers very interesting and cool stuff about GIMP and some really awesome photos!

Getting started with GIMP

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GIMP

beginlinux.com: GIMP – GNU Image Manipulation Program – has long been recognised as the premier Free Software package of its type. If you want to do serious work with photographs and you don’t want to pay anything (or you like your software free and open) GIMP is the first place to come.

Photoshop versus GIMP: the Empire Strikes Back

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GIMP

nicubunu.blogspot: My Photoshop course continues and in the classes where my homework was targeting the computer display my plan worked flawlessly: I used GIMP to do all the work and when done just saved as .PSD, I enjoyed the experience a lot. Now this strategy hit a roadblock:

Photoshop versus GIMP

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GIMP

nicubunu.blogspot: I will look at few basic tools in both apps, the tools which one expect to be taught in the very first classes when learning one of those apps. I will highlight the areas where GIMP does better.

New GIMP feature: Canvas Rotation

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GIMP

gimpusers.com: On the weekend Michael Natterer implemented a new feature that was often requested by painters: Canvas rotation.

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GNU/Linux Laptops for Developers

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today's leftovers

Graphics: Intel, Mesa, Wayland and Bosch

  • Intel's Mesa GLSL Shader Cache Is Speeding Up Game Load Times
    At the start of the month the Intel i965 Mesa driver finally landed its on-disk shader cache, months after the GLSL on-disk shader cache originally landed in core Mesa and wired up for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. While you can't play too many shader-heavy games with current Intel integrated graphics, this GLSL shader cache within Mesa 17.4-dev Git is working well for speeding up load times and does provide some frame-rate benefits in games dynamically loading shaders.
  • Bosch Has Been Developing A 3D Window Manager Using Wayland
    In what appears to be research for potential use within in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems, Bosch in conjunction with other organizations has been developing a 3D window manager that's built atop Wayland/Weston. Wayland is already used within automobiles for IVI purposes, etc, but this is the first we're seeing at least publicly of creating a 3D window manager around it. Harsha Manjula Mallikarjun of Bosch has talked about their work in developing a middleware framework for a 3D window manager that is making use of Wayland's Weston library, libweston. The window manager maps client buffers to 3D shapes like cubes and cylinders.
  • MESA_program_binary_formats Added To The OpenGL Registry
    Intel developers have seen their MESA_program_binary_formats extension added to the official OpenGL registry. The extension is really quite simple and just documents the unique format designator to be used by Mesa for ARB_get_program_binary/OES_get_program_binary extensions. Overnight it was merged into the OpenGL Registry.

Software: Nuclide, QEMU, Mailspring, GNOME Calendar and To Do, LibreOffice

  • Nuclide – An Open IDE for Mobile and Web Development
    It wasn’t too long ago that we wrote about an IDE that was developed by adding support for advanced debugging and development functions to Atom text editor to create Atom-IDE. We’ve got another such application for you today and it goes by the name of Nuclide. Nuclide is a free Electron-based IDE created by combining a collection of Atom’s features to provide IDE-like functions for several programming languages and technologies.
  • “Improving the performance of the qcow2 format” at KVM Forum 2017
    I was in Prague last month for the 2017 edition of the KVM Forum. There I gave a talk about some of the work that I’ve been doing this year to improve the qcow2 file format used by QEMU for storing disk images. The focus of my work is to make qcow2 faster and to reduce its memory requirements.
  • QEMU and function keys (follow-up)
    Since I posted my suggestion for QEMU a few weeks ago, I've learned a few things about QEMU. Thanks so much to the folks who contacted me via email to help me out. A brief review of my issue: I like to run FreeDOS in QEMU, on my Linux laptop. QEMU makes it really easy to boot FreeDOS or to test new installations. During our run up to the FreeDOS 1.2 release, I tested every pre-release version by installing under QEMU.
  • Mailspring Email Client is now available as a Snap app
    The Mailspring email client is now available as a Snap application on Ubuntu and other Linux distros. The part-Electron, part C++ mail app works with most major email providers, lets you add multiple accounts, has fast mail searching, and offers some advanced features, like read receipts and quick reply templates.
  • The Road to 3.28: Calendar and To Do
    It’s been a long time with no news. I guess work and masters are really getting in the way… good news is that I’ll finish masters in 2 months, and will have some free time to devote to this beloved project. “Bad” news is that, after almost 6 years, I’ll finally take some time to have a real vacation. I’ll stay 3 weeks out of the loop in February, a time where I’ll be traveling to the other side of the world, watching the sunset at the beach with my wife. Without a computer. While it’s unfortunate to the community, I think this time is necessary for my mental health – I’ve gone way too many times through the almost-burned-out state recently.
  • LIBREOFFICE MASCOT SURVEY: THE PROGRESS SO FAR
    As you’ve no doubt seen, over the last few months we’ve been looking for a LibreOffice mascot. This is just something fun for our community to use, for instance on T-shirts at events, so it doesn’t have to be ultra slick and professional – it isn’t a replacement for the official branding and logos that we use in the software, website and marketing materials. At the start, we asked for your submissions and received over 300 of them – thank you so much to everyone who contributed! Many of them were excellent, but we had to remove quite a few from the following voting round for various reasons (such as potential copyright issues, conflicts with other FOSS projects, and use of the official LibreOffice document logo). If your submission didn’t make it to the voting round, we still really appreciate your input, and we apologies if we didn’t make it clearer why some didn’t get through!