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GIMP

GIMP 2.10.22 Released with AVIF Support, Improved PSP and TIFF Support

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GIMP

GIMP 2.10.22 is here to add support for the AVIF image file format, which is a variant of the High Efficiency Image File Format (HEIF) container but using the powerful AV1 compression algorithm. Importing and exporting of AVIF files is supported.

On top of that, users will now be able to import and export HEIF files, which contain both AVIF and HEIC formats, in 10-bit and 12-bit depth per channel. Furthermore, GIMP 2.10.22 enables proper importing of NCLX color profiles and metadata.

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Create transparency in your game graphics with GIMP

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Gaming
GIMP
HowTos

Whether you're programming a game or an app with Python or Lua, you're probably using PNG graphics for your game assets. An advantage of the PNG format, which is not available in a JPEG, is the ability to store an alpha channel. Alpha is, essentially, the "color" of invisibility or transparency. Alpha is the part of an image you don't see. For example, if you were to draw a doughnut, the doughnut hole would be filled with alpha, and you could see whatever was behind it.

A common problem is how to find the alpha part of an image. Sometimes, your programming framework, whether it's Python Arcade, Pygame, LÖVE, or anything else, detects the alpha channel and treats it (after the appropriate function calls) as transparency. That means it renders no new pixels where there's alpha, leaving that doughnut hole empty. It's 100% transparent or 0% opaque and functionally "invisible."

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GIMP 2.10.20 Released with Advanced Crop and More Filters

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GIMP

The latest release of GIMP is here with new features and more bug fixes. And it is immediately available for download for Linux, Windows, and Mac.
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GIMP Tutorial: How to Outline Text

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GIMP

Learn how to add outline to text in GIMP in three easy and simple steps with this screenshot tutorial.
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Learn the 37 most frequently used shortcuts in GIMP

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GIMP

GIMP is a fantastic artist's tool for editing digital images, especially with the bevy of impressive features in the recent release of version 2.10. Of course, like all creative applications, you can get working more quickly if you can make yourself familiar with the various keyboard shortcuts and hotkeys available. GIMP, of course, gives you the ability to customize these shortcuts to match what you're personally comfortable with. However, the default shortcuts that GIMP ships with are impressive and generally easy to get used to.

This cheat sheet is not an exhaustive list of all of the defaults GIMP has available. Instead, it covers the most frequently used shortcuts so you can get to work as fast as possible. Plus, there should be a few in here that make you aware of a few features that maybe you weren't aware of.

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GIMP receives a $100K donation

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GNU
GNOME
GIMP
  • GIMP receives a $100K donation

    Earlier this month, GNOME Foundation announced that they receieved a $400,000 donation from Handshake.org, of which $100,000 they transferred to GIMP’s account.

    We thank both Handshake.org and GNOME Foundation for the generous donation and will use the money to do much overdue hardware upgrade for the core team members and organize the next hackfest to bring the team together, as well as sponsor the next instance of Libre Graphics Meeting.

    Handshake is a decentralized, permissionless naming protocol compatible with DNS where every peer is validating and in charge of managing the root zone with the goal of creating an alternative to existing Certificate Authorities. Its purpose is not to replace the DNS protocol, but to replace the root zone file and the root servers with a public commons.

  • GIMP Picks Up A $100k Donation, Part Of $400k To GNOME Foundation

    The GNOME Foundation received a $400k donation of which $100k is heading to the GIMP developers for helping to improve their open-source image manipulation program that for some can compete with Adobe's Photoshop functionality.

A free photo editor worth trying: Getting started with GIMP

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GNU
GIMP

When most of us are looking for a photo-editing tool, we immediately think of Photoshop. Adobe’s program is powerful and popular, but it’s pricey at $100—and that's for the “light” version called Photoshop Elements.

Meanwhile, $20 per month is the standard charge for individual one-app subscriptions to Photoshop Creative Cloud. Adobe offers a free in-browser version called Photoshop Express Editor, but it’s very limited and only allows you to edit JPEG files.

A better free alternative is to turn to the open-source world and a popular program called GIMP. The GNU Image Manipulation Program is the standard photo-editing tool included or available to most Linux distributions. GIMP is also available for Windows (XP and up) and Mac.

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GIMP On TV

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GNU
GIMP

I was watching an issue of CNN’s “Forensic Files” early this morning when I was surprised to see GIMP on TV. A murder had been committed and the local anthropologist lacked software to compare a skull with a portrait to verify the identity of the victim. A local computer guru was able to use GIMP to compare photographs of the skull with the portrait. That set the police on a course towards solving the crime. It turned out the truck driver did it. DNA from a tooth compared to some surgical evidence confirmed GIMP’s conclusions.

What was interesting is that Forensic Files mentioned that GIMP was available to anyone for a $free download. I liked that. The software licence, GPL, described in generic terms the public can understand got out there.

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GIMP free alternative to subscription model Photoshop updated

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GIMP

That would be the oddly-named GIMP (acronym for: GNU Image Manipulation Program), an open source, high-end image editing and creation alternative to Adobe’s Photoshop and its now open-ended, monthly wallet-siphoning distribution mode for tasks like photo retouching, image editing and composition, and image authoring.

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You Say GIMP Was Right

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GIMP

The split was the result of GIMP’s concern over policies at SourceForge, primarily SourceForge’s use of DevShare, an installer for Windows that bundles third party software offers with FOSS downloads. In addition, the GIMP folks had reservations about potentially deceptive “download here” buttons on ads being served by the likes of Google’s AdSense.

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More in Tux Machines

Distro Flashback: What happened to Cub Linux?

The operating system wasn’t always known as Cub Linux. In actuality, when it first got announced back in 2014, Chromixium OS was what it was called. After a year of its announcement, its first stable version hit the open-source world as a 32-bit live ISO. With that being said, this release didn’t go as smoothly as planned. There were several bugs reported by its users, which included slow menu generation and screen tearing. On the bright side, the developers soon got to solving these issues and released a service pack in addition to various updates. However, what really took Chromixium OS to the next level was the release of its 64-bit version in November 2015. All of this development hit a roadblock when the owner of Chromium and Chrome OS, Google, sent a request to the operating system’s developers to give up the name ‘Chromixium’ and other related social media presences websites. However, that couldn’t stop the head of this project, RichJack, as they soon addressed this issue and renamed their OS as Cub Linux. These events took place in late 2015 and ended on a positive note, but the project didn’t know what was approaching its way in 2016. When 2016 was nearing its end, Cub Linux users started noticing one big thing: the official website had been missing. This turned out to indicate the demise of a project that could have done wonders in the future. Even though their GitHub page is open to this very day, the development had stopped, and there was no point in keeping up with Cub Linux anymore. According to a developer, this project’s sudden end could be attributed to “private life restrictions,” which is as vague as a statement could get. With that being said, as far as the future of Cub Linux is concerned, many other developers got interested in this project and wanted to pick it up. Accordingly, the Feren OS developer announced in 2017 that he would give Cub Linux a major overhaul and “bring back Cub” with the name of Phoenix Linux. This might seem like good news to some, but honestly, the future of Phoenix Linux doesn’t seem too bright since the project hasn’t received another update since March 2018. If we’re really hopeful, we’ll get something as soon as 2021, but waiting any longer wouldn’t make much sense. Read more

Python Programming

  • Only Python: Friendly-traceback: work in progress

    It's been almost two months since my last blog post and I feel guilty of not haven't taken the time to write more regularly.  I should really tell you about how fantastic Will McGugan's Rich is, and how I have customized it for my projects. I should also tell you how Sylvain Desodt's DidYouMeanPython has been influencing Friendly-traceback latest developments. Also worthy of note is how Alex Hall's FutureCoder project is incorporating so many neat tools that it feels like a real honour that he has incorporated Friendly-traceback in it. Alas, while I have been busy making many changes and addition to the code, the documentation is hopelessly behind and no longer gives a correct picture of what Future-traceback is now capable of. So much to do, so little time. So, I will just end with a picture, and go back to coding, with a promise of writing more ... soon I hope.

  • Python range() Function – Linux Hint

    Python is a modern, general-purpose, and high-level programming language that comes with powerful features. Python has many built-in modules to support diverse operations. The range() function is a built-in function used to perform specific tasks or actions for a definite number of times. In other words, the range() function is used to perform a task iteratively. This function is used in conjunction with the for loop and the while loop.

  • Python Dictionaries – Linux Hint

    Python is an efficient and versatile programming language. It is one of the most frequently used high-level programming languages to perform data-related tasks due to its many supportive built-in modules and functions. To mention some of its many built-in data structures, it has arrays, lists, tuples, etc. Dictionaries are one of the built-in data structures in Python. It holds the data in the form of a key-value pair. The keys are the unique value that acts as a representative of data. The key is also called as “an index value”. Data structures are a very important aspect of any programming language. They are used to store and manipulate the data in a well-organized and efficient way. Therefore, Python dictionaries are more useful when we need to store the data in a form of key-value pair and to access the data faster. The Python dictionaries return the data faster because the key value for every data is unique, therefore the searching time for data is reduced, and we get the result faster. This article explicates the Python dictionaries in detail.

  • Python Classes – Linux Hint

    Python is one of the multiuse high-level programming languages. It is an object-oriented programming language. The main difference between the procedural and object-oriented programming languages is that we cannot create the classes in procedural programming languages. The main focus of procedural languages is on creating functions, and variables for performing the task whereas, in object-oriented programming languages, our main concern is to create objects and use them for performing our tasks. A class is simply a blueprint that contains functions and variables. A class is like a real-life classroom of any institute. It contains some chairs, tables, desks, a projector, walls, etc. base on all these components; we build a classroom. All these components are the variables and functions in a class, and a classroom is an object. The Python classes and objects are explained in this article.

  • FreeBSD process environ and resource limits

    New psutil 5.7.3 is out. This release adds support for 2 functionalities which were not available on BSD platforms: the ability to get the process environment (all BSD) and to get or set process resource limits (FreeBSD only), similarly to what can be done on Linux.  

Kernel: KVM, Btrfs and nosymfollow

Japanese IME on PCLinuxOS 64 KDE5 Magnum 2020 1015

I recently saw that my install of PCLinuxOS was behaving funny after and update: the effects ceased working and web pages were loading slowly. Last time this happened to me, I had to install a new iso because I had been working with a very old one. This time, however, I had kept up with all the updates thanks to the convenient Simple Update Notifier, but something was not good. Anyway, I decided to install the new PCLinuxOS 64 KDE5 Magnum 2020 1015. The installation went well, but I was worried because I normally install the PCLinuxOS GRUB2 on the distro partition, not on the MBR, but it was not possible for me to do it this time, so I was predicting a mess trying to boot OpenMandriva, Mageia, MX Linux, and Elive. Read more