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OLPC

Mesh networks on OLPC: it's all about the application level

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OLPC

o'reilly onlamp: I went down to the Cambridge, Massachusetts lab of One Laptop Per Child today to find out what they’re doing with mesh networks. A One Laptop Per Child system has limited value on its own. Its most innovative and powerful features lie in its participation in a mesh network with other laptops. So get your neighbors and workmates to buy them too!

XO laptop sales begin, but support plan is nonexistent

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Richard Koman: Today the effort moved to the world of consumer sales and philanthropy, as OLPC’s Give 1, Get 1 program launched. And it appears that by the end of day the website was saying there were only 12 days left in the sale. That’s confusing because OLPC has said there will be no limit.

One Laptop Per Me

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OLPC

c|net blogs: I had to wake up early in the morning to do it, but I was able to order an XO laptop from the One Laptop Per Child Foundation (and donate another at the same time). I was prepared to discover the project's website was overloaded with visitors-- one observer predicted the alloted systems would sell out "in 30 seconds"-- but I had no problems.

Hands On With One Laptop Per Child's XO

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OLPC

tech.yahoo.com/blogs/raskin: There's been quite a fuss made over the XO, developed by Nicholas Negroponte's One Laptop Per Child (OLPC). The OLPC vision was to design a low-cost, but powerful connected PC in order to provide kids all over the world with Internet-power. OLPC wants to sell the XO, in bulk, to third-world countries.

EA gives Sim City to OLPC project

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OLPC

gameinfowire.com: Electronic Arts Inc. announced the company will donate the original SimCity — the blockbuster 1989 game credited with giving rise to the city-building game genre — to each computer in the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) initiative.

Who wants to kill the OLPC project?

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OLPC

ITProPortal: Today marks the official mass production of the OLPC (or XO laptop computer). However, the project has lost some buzz and It is hard not to think that there's a global neo-conspiracy to harm the OLPC project.

OLPC rolls off the production line

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OLPC

tectonic: Here, for the first time, are pictures of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) coming off the production line at the Quantas factory in China.

T-Mobile USA Partners with One Laptop Per Child Program

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OLPC

techluver.com: T-Mobile USA, Inc. today announced it is partnering with One Laptop per Child for its Give One Get One initiative. T-Mobile is offering one year of complimentary T-Mobile HotSpot access to people who donate an XO laptop to a child in a developing country through the campaign.

Vatican Supports the “One Laptop Per Child” Initiative

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OLPC

catholicnews.com: A plan to equip the world's poorest schoolchildren with a low-cost, rugged, portable, wireless laptop has found some enthusiastic support among the Jesuits and in the Vatican.

Price of MIT professor's '$100 laptop' hits $200

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OLPC

Reuters: A computer developed for poor children around the world, dubbed 'the $100 laptop,' has reached a milestone: Its price tag is now $200.

Also: Uruguay buys first $100 laptops

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Riot Games, Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, Dead Cells

  • Riot Games' anti-cheat software for League also targets Linux users
    This week Riot Games implemented a new anti-cheat software for the game that is meant to limit the number of players who use third-party programs while playing. Most of these programs help users cheat in-game, such as by inputting movement commands for a player to allow them to dodge enemy skillshots. Unfortunately for players who run Linux as their operating system, the new anti-cheat also targets it as a third-party program, preventing them from playing League. Many players took to Reddit and other forums to protest the change, even creating a petition for Riot to add Linux compatibility.
  • Riot Games New Anti-Cheat Could Wipe Out League of Legends Linux Player Base
    ​Riot Games has been working on a new anti-cheat system for League of Legends. There are reports that this update would make the game unplayable for Linux users, because it would make the game incompatible with virtual environments, something Linux users have to employ to play the game.
  • A small but nice update on Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Linux support
    We've been waiting quite a while for any real news on the Linux port of Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [Official Site]. While we still don't know when, we do know it's still happening.
  • Dead Cells, a 'RogueVania' now has a Beta available for Linux
    Dead Cells mixes in elements of a Rogue-lite with a MetroidVania to create an interesting mix and it's now available on Linux with a Beta. I did notice in the comments of the previous article, that people were debating the choice of article title. I said it was a "rogue-lite metroidvania action-platformer", which was obviously a bit wrong. They've actually coined their own term for it, calling it a "RogueVania".

"Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp."

  • Mixed Reaction
  • After Github purchase, Microsoft remains a relatively untrusted open source player to some
  • What is GitHub?
    GitHub is now the de facto home of open-source software. But Microsoft’s acquisition reignited a debate over the platform’s centrality. Microsoft assures users the service is safe under its stewardship, but many are wary. When Mr Ballmer spoke of developers, he had a specific sort in mind: those using Microsoft’s tools to build projects for Microsoft products. He once called open-source Linux a “cancer”, which would spread uncontrollably. In a sense, his words proved prophetic: today, open-source software is everywhere, from websites to financial markets to self-driving cars. Under Mr Nadella’s leadership, Microsoft has embraced open-source development. In buying GitHub it hopes to gain the trust of developers it once spurned. But some wonder if the change is complete, or if Microsoft will use its newly bought dominance of open-source hosting to push its own products. Alternatives to GitHub—some themselves open-source—wait in the wings. If it is not careful, Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp.

Making Free Software Suffer Using New Laws

  • Free software is at risk in the EU -- take action now
    Members of the European Parliament want to turn upload platforms like GitLab into "censorship machines" that require user-uploaded materials to be monitored and automatically filtered, a process which would prevent modified and reused code from being uploaded. This provision is covered under Article 13 of the Copyright Directive. If Article 13, embedded within the proposal, becomes official policy, it will be impossible for developers to build off of one another's code -- which is not only a blow to the collaborative development of free software, but a push against the basic freedoms of free software. Software isn't free unless it can be modified and shared. Article 13 will affect all users of free software -- as development of free software suffers, the quality and availability of updates, new features, and new programs will also suffer.
  • Open Source Industry Australia Says Zombie TPP Could Destroy Free Software Licensing
    Without the ability to enforce compliance through the use of injunctions, open source licenses would once again be pointless. Although the OSIA is concerned about free software in Australia, the same logic would apply to any TPP-11 country. It would also impact other nations that joined the Pacific pact later, as the UK is considering (the UK government seems not to have heard of the gravity theory for trade). It would presumably apply to the US if it did indeed rejoin the pact, as has been mooted. In other words, the impact of this section on open source globally could be significant. It's worth remembering why this particular article is present in TPP. It grew out of concerns that nations like China and Russia were demanding access to source code as a pre-requisite of allowing Western software companies to operate in their countries. Article 14.17 was designed as a bulwark against such demands. It's unlikely that it was intended to destroy open source licensing too, although some spotted early on that this was a risk. And doubtless a few big software companies will be only too happy to see free software undermined in this way. Unfortunately, it's probably too much to hope that the Australian Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence & Trade will care about or even understand this subtle software licensing issue. The fate of free software in Australia will therefore depend on whether TPP-11 comes into force, and if so, what judges think Article 14.17 means.

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