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OLPC

News about LANCOR v. OLPC

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OLPC
Legal

Groklaw: I was reading some cynical documents just filed in the LANCOR v. OLPC litigation. Yes, it's begun in a Nigerian court. LANCOR has actually done it.

No OLPC Laptop for Me For Christmas

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OLPC

blogs.pcworld: I've received word from the OLPC folks that shipment of the XO $100 $200 laptop I'm entitled because I paid for one for a child in a developing nation has been delayed.

My (daughter’s) OLPC laptop has arrived

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OLPC

blogs.zdnet: My–actually my daughter’s–XO laptop from the One Laptop Per Child Project has arrived and a few things were striking: Its size (built for kids), the software interface, which is very intuitive, and the realization that this tool is designed for children–not adults. In other words, dad needs to step aside and see how the XO does with the kids.

XOh the Humanity! The First XO Brick Delivery

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OLPC

olpcnews.com: So, I was a first day donor (bought online about two hours in) and finally got my XO this morning... and it is DOA! No lights, no power.

A OLPC Give One Get None Horror Story

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OLPC

olpcnews.com: When One Laptop Per Child announced Give One Get One, Jon Camfield worried about the grey markets allowing XO theft to vandalize education. Sadly, we now have another theft to add. Bob was a victum of Give One Get None.

The Kite Runner Inspires Gift Through One Laptop

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OLPC

Press Release: Masi Oka, star of NBC's hit ensemble series "Heroes" and global ambassador for OLPC said, "This generous donation through One Laptop per Child is a great example of the diverse organizations participating in our giving campaign to provide educational assistance to communities in need throughout the developing world."

Give me rice, but give me a laptop too

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OLPC

BBC: Criticism of plans to get technology into the developing world is misplaced, says Bill Thompson. US journalist John Dvorak has weighed into the debate, dismissing the laptop as a 'little green computer' that changes nothing, and arguing that sending food aid to Africa is a better way to solve the continent's problems. Dvorak is so wrong that it pains me.

Sri Lankan school children soon may own “$100 laptop”

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OLPC

lankarates.com: Some of the two million primary school students in Sri Lanka soon may get to own the “$100 laptop” if an ambitious plan to introduce the product into Sri Lanka gets adequate support, officials said.

Microsoft: Stripped-Down Version of Windows XP for OLPC Due in 2008

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OLPC

wired: New details surfaced Wednesday about Microsoft's plans to get Windows XP running on the OLPC.

Also: No Microsoft Windows XP on OLPC XO

One Laptop Per Child Doesn't Change the World

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OLPC

John C. Dvorak: Hands Across America, Live AID, the Concert for Bangladesh, and so on. These folks think that any sort of participation in these events, or even their good thoughts about world poverty and starvation, actually help. Now they can sleep at night. It doesn't matter that nothing has really changed. This is how I view the cute, little One Laptop Per Child computer.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11

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KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

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