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OLPC

OLPC XO-1

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OLPC

bunniestudios.com: I got an OLPC XO-1 a few days ago in the mail as part of the give one, get one program. Hopefully some child out there is enjoying their new laptop–there’s a certain amount of opacity in the process so I have no idea even if this laptop went to some needy far-flung village in a developing nation, as most of the propaganda would have you believe.

Negroponte turns up the heat on Intel

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OLPC

zdnet.com.au: Intel has denied claims made by One Laptop per Child that it broke a "non-disparagement" agreement and hit back at suggestions that it did not even contribute "a single line of code" to the project.

One clunky laptop per child

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OLPC

economist.com: IT WOULD be a stunt, but one perhaps worth performing, to write this column on the tiny, green and white, $200 XO computer from One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) that sits idle before your columnist. Alas, he cannot.

Also: Give One, Get One campaign raises $35m

Comparing the OLPC XO Laptop and Intel’s Classmate PC

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OLPC

gotoxo.wordpress: While browsing some XO-related web sites recently I came across a link to the home page of Intel’s new Classmate PC, Classmate PC, and did an investigation into the content.

Also: OLPC Considering 'Give One, Get One' Offer in Europe
And: Followup from Intel on the OLPC debacle

First Look: OLPC's XO Laptop

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OLPC

pcworld.com: To say the $188 XO laptop produced by the One Laptop Per Child organization is not your typical laptop is an understatement. For one, the XO is a tech triumph for its low price and rugged design, and will amaze any child in a developing nation (the laptop's intended recipient) lucky enough to get one. On the other hand, anyone familiar with a Windows-based notebook and who expects a similar experience with the XO will be sorely disappointed.

Is OLPC team crossing the lines?

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OLPC

thetechandcents.com: If OLPC team cannot demand that Intel would stop all their "competing with OLPC" programs, then by doing so they are crossing the line. I'm beginning to see sorts of weird "we're the volunteering for the poor, how can you compete with us? shame on you!!!" attitude.

Third World children love new laptops

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OLPC

AP: Doubts about whether poor, rural children really can benefit from quirky little computers evaporate as quickly as the morning dew in this hilltop Andean village, where 50 primary-school children got machines from the One Laptop Per Child project six months ago.

OLPC: Won't miss Intel's 'half-hearted' laptop effort

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OLPC

computerworld.com: Intel's resignation from the One Laptop Per Child Project's board of directors will have "no impact" on the group's operations, since the chip maker contributed little to the project since joining last year, OLPC President Walter Bender said in an interview.

Also: Is OLPC in trouble?

Lessons learned: Two weeks with the XO laptop

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OLPC

zdnet blogs: Repeat after me. The XO laptop from the One Laptop Per Child project is designed for kids. Why bore yourself with that mantra? If you don’t you may find yourself griping about something that wasn’t designed for you in the first place.

Also: How politics is stifling $100 laptop dream
And: What future for OLPC?

One Laptop Per Geek - A Review in Many Parts

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OLPC

opsamericas.com: So I decided to try an experiment, and participated in the G1G1 (Give 1, Get 1) program from the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) project. At first glance, it looks like a very small version of the Mac clamshell laptops.

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today's howtos

Linux Foundation: Juniper/OpenContrail and Bell Canada at Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP)

  • Juniper Expands Contrail, Moves Open-Source Project to the Linux Foundation
    "Fortunately at Juniper we have a secrect weapon and one that i'm so very proud of and that's Contrail," Rami Rahim, Juniper Networks CEO said during his keynote. "The way we have been investing and innovating in Contrail over the last few years is sort of similar to how a car company would invest in a Formula 1 car, it's essentially a proving ground for the world's best technology." Rahim commented that the use-cases for Contrail so far have been somewhat limited, but that's about to change. "The future of Contrail is as a platform, a single controller that can solve a variety of really compelling use-cases with ease and simplicity," Rahim said. "Whether it's management of overlay and underlay, or SD-WAN connectivity, or multi-cloud fabric management." Juniper originally acquired Contrail in December 2012 in a deal valued at $176 million. In September 2013, Juniper open-sourcedthe Contrail technology, creating the OpenContrail project.
  • Juniper Networks' OpenContrail software defined network joins The Linux Foundation
    The Linux Foundation is far more than just Linux. It's also the home of many open-source networking projects such as the software-defined network (SDN) OpenDaylight, Open Platform for Network Function Virtualization (OPNFV), and Open Network Automation Program (ONAP). Now, networking power Juniper Networks has announced that OpenContrail, its open-source network virtualization cloud platform, will join the others as part of The Linux Foundation.
  • Juniper Moves OpenContrail to the Linux Foundation
    Juniper first released its Contrail products as open source in 2013 and built a community around the project. However, many stakeholders complained that Juniper didn’t work very hard to build the community, and some called it “faux-pen source.”
  • Juniper Moves SDN-Based OpenContrail Project to The Linux Foundation
    Juniper Networks today announced the codebase for OpenContrail, its open source network virtualization platform for the cloud, is moving to The Linux Foundation.
  • Bell Canada says open source ONAP adds modularity, flexibility to its network
    Bell Canada has become one of the first service providers to deploy Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), focusing its initial attention on automating its data center tenant network provisioning process. By making this transition in its network, the service provider said it will provide its operations teams with a new tool to improve efficiency and time to market. This is the first step in using ONAP as a common platform across Bell’s networks on its journey towards a multipartner DevOps model.
  • Bell Canada First to Deploy Open Source ONAP in Production
    Canadian communications provider Bell is the first organization to deploy an open source version of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) in a production environment. The milestone was noted in a blog post by Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking and orchestration with the Linux Foundation.

Software: Everdo, GIMP, Notepadqq

  • Everdo – A Todo List and Getting Things Done App for Linux
    Everdo is a modern and beautifully-designed Electron-based task management application with which you can keep track of your work using tags, project folders, smart filters, and schedules. It doesn’t need a cloud account to work so your data will remain save on your PC. Everdo features a modern and minimalist User Interface with an extremely clean, clutter-less, and uniform design in order to enhance speedy and distraction-free productivity.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released with On-Canvas Gradient Editing, Better PSD Support
    GIMP 2.9.8 has been released with on-canvas gradient editing, better handling of Adobe Photoshop PSD files, and support for those using GIMP on Wayland.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released With On-Canvas Gradient Editing, Wayland Support
    GIMP 2.9.8 has been released as the newest development version of this widely-used, open-source Photoshop-like program in its road to GIMP 2.10. Earlier this week I happened to highlight many of the changes building up for GIMP 2.9.8 as featured in A Lot Of Improvements Are Building Up For GIMP 2.9.8, Including Better Wayland Support.
  • Getting started with the Notepadqq Linux text editor
    I don't do Windows. The operating system, I mean. At least, not on my own computers and not with any of my own work. When I was a consultant, I often had to work out of my clients' offices, which meant using their hardware, which also meant using Windows at many of those offices. Even when using Windows, I tried to install as much open source software as I could. Why? Because it works as well as (if not better than) its proprietary equivalents. One of the applications I always installed was Notepad++, which Opensource.com community moderator Ruth Holloway looked at in 2016.

Getting started with the Notepadqq Linux text editor

I don't do Windows. The operating system, I mean. At least, not on my own computers and not with any of my own work. When I was a consultant, I often had to work out of my clients' offices, which meant using their hardware, which also meant using Windows at many of those offices. Even when using Windows, I tried to install as much open source software as I could. Why? Because it works as well as (if not better than) its proprietary equivalents. One of the applications I always installed was Notepad++, which Opensource.com community moderator Ruth Holloway looked at in 2016. Read more