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OLPC

OLPC Decision Not Final, RMS Asks: Can We Rescue OLPC from Windows?

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OLPC

groklaw.net: Richard Stallman just switched to an OLPC XO, for the free bios, and at that same moment in time, Nicholas Negroponte made some odd statements about Windows and the OLPC. Walter Bender's replacement has just been announced, by the way:

OLPC's Open Source Rift Deepens

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OLPC

ostatic.com: The situation at One Laptop Per Child (OLPC), the organization behind the "$100 laptop," looks like it's going from bad to worse. At the center of the conflict appears to be the issue of how deep the laptop's open source roots should be.

Can we rescue OLPC from Windows?

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OLPC

fsf.org/blogs: I read Negroponte's statement presenting the OLPC XO as a platform for Windows in the most ironic circumstances possible: during a week of preparing, under a deadline, to migrate personally to an XO. I made this decision for one specific reason: freedom.

This, too, shall pass, or: Things to remember when reading news about OLPC

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radian.org: It’s easy to get caught up in the doom and gloom over OLPC’s future. But keep things in perspective: they aren’t as bad as they seem.

It’s time to stick a fork in the OLPC

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OLPC

blogs.the451group: Dana Blankenhorn yesterday called the OLPC project a failure for its inability to mass market a low-cost Linux laptop. Dana’s definition of failure, in this case, seems to be based on the quantity of XO laptops distributed.

Top OLPC Executive Resigns After Restructuring

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OLPC

pcworld.com: Drastic internal restructuring at the One Laptop Per Child Project has led to the resignation of one of the nonprofit's top executives from the effort. Walter Bender, the former president of software and content at OLPC, has left.

Also: Will OLPC Abandon Open Source?

Another XO review

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OLPC

thelinuxsociety.org.uk: The OLPC arrived home while my daughter was out and just before her 4th birthday. On seeing it she immediately identified it as a laptop, for children (as hers).

Falling in Love with the XO All Over Again

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OLPC

blog.olenepal.org: I got involved with OLPC back in June of 2006. It’s hard to believe that was almost two years ago! Over the last two years this enthusiasm waxed and waned. It was only in January of this year that I really got to use the little device. At OLPC offices I disassembled and reassembled two XO’s. What fun!

13 phases for getting sugar: My odyssey to the OLPC XO

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OLPC

screenage.de/blog: What a journey! It took four and a half month for me to get my OLPC XO. I had to wait four and a half month for the XO and spent at least 550 USD for it (400 for the G1G1, 40 for the delivery to the US, 100 for the delivery to Germany and 10 for a converter).

XO Laptop Review

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OLPC

ugo.com: The XO is about the size of a standard textbook and weighs a little over three pounds. It runs at 433 Mhz with 256 MB of RAM, 1 GB of flash storage and, not surprisingly, a free Linux-based operating system. It has three USB ports, microphone and headphone jacks, built-in microphone and 0.3-megapixel camera, and SD memory card slot.

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Red Hat Leftovers

  • Red Hat Adds AI Capabilities to Process Automation Suite
  • Department of Defense Enlists Red Hat to Help Improve Squadron Operations and Flight Training

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that the Department of Defense (DoD) worked with Red Hat to help improve aircraft and pilot scheduling for United States Marine Corps (USMC), United States Navy (USN) and United States Air Force (USAF) aircrews. Using modern development practices and processes from Red Hat Open Innovation Labs that prioritized end user needs, the project team identified unaddressed roadblocks and gained new skills to build the right solution, a digital "Puckboard" application, for their unique scheduling challenge. [...] The problem facing squadrons was seemingly straightforward: how to improve and digitize the management of flight training operations. The existing process was entirely manual, each representing pertinent information like a pilot’s name, associated with their training syllabus, location and time of flights. Simple at a glance, the number of cognitive variables contained within this undertaking made it stressful for the operator and difficult to scale across squadrons and bases. For more than a decade, various project teams within the DoD had tried to improve the system via custom built applications, aircraft scheduling software and hybrid solutions. None of these deployments withstood the test of time or could be replicated if the operator took a new role elsewhere. The Defense Innovation Unit (DIU), an organization tasked with accelerating commercial technologies into the military, took on this challenge.

  • It's RedHat, And Everyone Else

    As time passes, it appears that corporations are primarily considering one distribution when considering installing Linux, and that distro is clearly RedHat. That probably does not come as any major surprise, but it appears RedHat's dominance continues to get stronger. What use to be a landscape littered with a multitude of choices has nearly been rendered down to one. Wow! That didn't take long. The open source software dynamic seemed to be formed on the premise that users were never again going to be pigeon-holed into using one piece of software. Or, perhaps better stated, that was a byproduct of making the source code readily available. And, that is still true to this day. However, as a corporate citizen in today's business climate, one finds themselves with limited possibilities. It was a mere 20 years ago when the buzz of Linux was starting to hit its stride. Everywhere you looked, there was a different flavor of Linux. There were nearly too many to count. And, these were not just hobbyist distros. Instead, they were corporations rising like corn stalks all over the place. Sure, there were more dominant players, but one had the ability to analyze at least 10 different fully corporate supported distributions when making a decision. With that amount of possibilities, the environment was ripe for consolidation or elimination. And, we have all watched that take place. But, did we ever think we were going to find ourselves in the current predicament? The data that has been collected over the past five years paints a concerning picture. Even a mere five years ago, it seemed likely that at a minimum RedHat would always have Suse as a legitimate competitor. After all, those were the two distros that seemed to win the consolidation and elimination war. At least in the corporate space. As was widely reported during that time, RedHat had somewhere in the neighborhood of 70% marketshare. It was always the gorilla in the room. But, Suse was always looked upon as an eager and willing participant, no matter its stature, and tended to garner most of the remaining marketshare. That is the way it appeared for a length of time prior to this decline over the past few years.

  • Scale testing the Red Hat OpenStack Edge with OpenShift

    Red Hat Openstack offers an Edge computing architecture called Distributed Compute Nodes (DCN), which allows for many hundreds or thousands of Edge sites by deploying hundreds or thousands of compute nodes remotely, all interacting with a central control plane over a routed (L3) network. Distributed compute nodes allow compute node sites to be deployed closer to where they are used, and are generally deployed in greater numbers than would occur in a central datacenter. With all the advantages that this architecture brings, there are also several scale challenges due to the large number of compute nodes that are managed by the OpenStack controllers. A previous post details deploying, running and testing a large scale environment using Red Hat OpenStack Director on real hardware, but this post is about how we can simulate far greater scale and load on the OpenStack control plane for testing using containers running on OpenShift without needing nearly as much hardware. In order to prove the effectiveness of Red Hat's DCN architecture, we'd like to be able to get quantitative benchmarks on Red Hat Openstack's performance when many hundreds or thousands of compute nodes are deployed.

today's howtos

How to Clear Systemd Journal Logs in Linux

This quick tutorial shows you two ways to clear systemd journal logs from your Linux system. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, Linux Headlines and 'Talk Python to Me'

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E32 – Dungeon Keeper

    This week we’ve become addicted to Sedna SSD to PCIe controller cards. We discuss why distro hoppers are the worst, bring you some GUI love and round up our listener feedback. It’s Season 12 Episode 32 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • I.T. Phone Home | TechSNAP 416

    Ubiquiti’s troublesome new telemetry, Jim’s take on the modern Microsoft, and why Project Silica just might be the future of long term storage.

  • 2019-11-14 | Linux Headlines

    Mirantis acquires Docker, WordPress brings a big new feature to Jetpack, GitHub has a plan for archiving the world's open source code, and a new developer hub is available for Go.

  • Talk Python to Me: #238 Collaborative data science with Gigantum

    Collaborative data science has a few challenges. First of all, those who you are collaborating with might not be savvy enough in the computer science techniques (for example, git and source control or docker and Linux). Second, seeing the work and changes others have made is a challenge too.