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OOo

Fork history does not favor OpenOffice.org

Filed under
LibO
OOo

itworld.com: There are two long-standing opinions about forks in the FLOSS community: they weaken projects or they strengthen projects. There are interesting arguments on either side of the debate, but if history is any judge, there is a strong trend: the project that forked away from the mainline project tends to be the ultimate survivor.

Two projects, one community

Filed under
LibO
OOo

standardsandfreedom.net: I really avoided to comment on the latest developments at Apache and OpenOffice.org. Now that the OpenOffice.org project has formally been voted as an Apache project in incubation phase, I feel I can more easily comment on this latest move.

OpenOffice, LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO
OOo
  • OpenOffice, LibreOffice and the Scarcity Fallacy
  • LibreOffice shows the strengths of FOSS
  • New option to specify initial number of sheets
  • Toolbar Improvements

OpenOffice.Org and the LibreOffice Imperative

Filed under
LibO
OOo

computerworlduk.com: The best thing end-users can do is ignore OpenOffice.org at Apache until the dust settles, and switch to LibreOffice instead.

Also: Apache votes to accept OpenOffice.org for incubation
And: License This!

LibreOffice and OpenOffice.org: Missing the Big Picture

Filed under
LibO
OOo

ingwa2.blogspot: The big picture is that we are all together in a much bigger fight: the one between the Open Document Format (ODF) and the proprietary formats of Microsoft Office. So here are the facts of the current situation:

FSF favors LibreOffice over OpenOffice

Filed under
LibO
OOo

zdnet.com: Some people in the open-source community are not at all pleased that Oracle has given OpenOffice to Apache and so they are throwing their support behind LibreOffice.

Open letter to Apache regarding OOo / LibO

Filed under
LibO
OOo
  • Open letter to Apache regarding OpenOffice / LibreOffice
  • OpenOffice + Apache = Open Content Innovation
  • Like a box of chocolates

Strip mining of OpenOffice.org

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OOo

linuxuser.co.uk: Oracle’s donation of the OpenOffice.org to the Apache Software Foundation does no favours for the users or developers of open office suites, says Richard Hillesley…

Is Oracle Holding Back OpenOffice Files from Apache?

Filed under
OOo

ostatic.com: Michael Meeks published some interesting statistics on the completeness of the OpenOffice source code contributed to the Apache Software Foundation. We can see that the Oracle OpenOffice code is incomplete.

The Open Source Office Software Sector Heats Up

Filed under
LibO
OOo

linuxjournal.com: The world of LibreOffice and OpenOffice(.org) has been heating up recently with several exciting and, at times, bewildering developments.

Also: Oracle and OpenOffice: The Final Insult

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