Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OOo

OpenOffice 3.2 - now with less Microsoft envy

Filed under
OOo

channelregister.co.uk: If you've ever tried opening or converting .docx and other Microsoft Office 2007 file formats outside of Office 2007 itself, you've likely pounded your head against more than a few walls. That should be a thing of the past with OpenOffice 3.2.

Open Office 3.2: Faster, More Office Compatibility

Filed under
OOo

earthweb.com: The concept of an office suite, with word processing, spreadsheet and presentation software, is one that is well understood by users, which is also why it's often difficult to improve them. Users already expect their office suites to do certain things, making the job of office suite developers often one of fit and finish.

OpenOffice.org 3.2.0 officially released today

Filed under
OOo

blogs.sun.com: At the start of its tenth anniversary year, and with over three hundred million downloads recorded in total, the OpenOffice.org Community today announced the release of the latest version of its personal productivity suite, OpenOffice.org 3.2.

OpenOffice trouble, again, again, again

Filed under
OOo

blog.flameeyes.eu: I’m definitely reaching my limit with OpenOffice. I’m not just going to bless OpenOffice as perfection just because it’s Free, it’ll have to improve for that.

Open Office 3.2.0 Final Released

Filed under
OOo

ghacks.net: Open Office 3.2.0 Final has been released and is currently distributed to mirror ftp servers worldwide to ensure a smooth delivery once the release notifications will be added to the project’s homepage.

The Small Picture: More OpenOffice.org Extensions

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: Every few weeks, I like to browse the OpenOffice.org Extensions site to see what is available, and what people are using. New extensions that are both useful and well-designed seem to be getting few and far between. However, if you search patiently, you can still find extensions worth trying.

Also: OpenOffice.org 3.2.0 Release Candidate 5 available

A data cruncher bites the dust

Filed under
Software
OSS
OOo

thebeezspeaks.blogspot: I know this post is gonna get me into trouble, but frankly - I don't care. FOSS programs didn't work for me. Ok, now I've said it. But it's the truth.

Study: > 21% of German PCs run OpenOffice

Filed under
OOo

h-online.com: According to Webmasterpro.de, a German IT service provider, the open source OpenOffice suite and its derivatives, such as StarOffice or IBM's Lotus Symphony, are installed on more than 21% of German PCs.

OpenOffice.org Extensions for Business Users

Filed under
OOo

blog.worldlabel.com: OpenOffice.org is an excellent all-around productivity suite as it is, but you can add a few useful features using extensions to make it better suited for use in a business environment. Here are a handful of extensions worth considering if you are using OpenOffice.org as a business tool.

Oracle reveals strategy

Filed under
Software
OOo
  • Oracle reveals strategy for GlassFish, MySQL, OpenOffice, and Solaris
  • Oracle will boost MySQL, release Cloud Office suite
  • Scott McNealy signs off in style
  • Farewell To Solaris Express Community Edition
  • OpenOffice.org 3.2.0 RC 4 available
  • OOo: Common Findbar
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Gemini PDA will ship with Android, but it also supports Debian, Ubuntu, Sailfish, and Postmarket OS (crowdfunding, work in progress)

The makers of the Gemini PDA plan to begin shipping the first units of their handheld computer to their crowdfunding campaign backers any day now. And while the folks at Planet Computer have been calling the Gemini PDA a dual OS device (with Android and Linux support) from the get go, it turns out the first units will actually just ship with Android. Read more

Red Hat: CO.LAB, Kubernetes/OpenShift, Self-Serving 'Study' and More

Browsers: Mozilla and Iridium

  • Best Web Browser
    When the Firefox team released Quantum in November 2017, they boasted it was "over twice as fast as Firefox from 6 months ago", and Linux Journal readers generally agreed, going as far as to name it their favorite web browser. A direct response to Google Chrome, Firefox Quantum also boasts decreased RAM usage and a more streamlined user interface.
  • Share Exactly What You See On-Screen With Firefox Screenshots
    A “screenshot” is created when you capture what’s on your computer screen, so you can save it as a reference, put it in a document, or send it as an image file for others to see exactly what you see.
  • What Happens when you Contribute, revisited
    I sat down to write a post about my students' experiences this term contributing to open source, and apparently I've written this before (and almost exactly a year ago to the day!) The thing about teaching is that it's cyclic, so you'll have to forgive me as I give a similar lecture here today. I'm teaching two classes on open source development right now, two sections in an introductory course, and another two in a follow-up intermediate course. The students are just starting to get some releases submitted, and I've been going through their blogs, pull requests, videos (apparently this generation likes making videos, which is something new for me), tweets, and the like. I learn a lot from my students, and I wanted to share some of what I'm seeing.
  • Iridium Browser: A Browser for the Privacy Conscience
    Iridium is a web browser based on Chromium project. It has been customized to not share your data and thus keeping your privacy intact.

Programming: Pyenv, GitHub, LLVM

  • Pyenv – Python Version Management Made Easier
    You’re a programmer who wants to test your python code on multiple different Python environments. What would you do? Install a specific python version and test your code and then uninstall that version and again install another different version and test code? No, wait! It is completely unnecessary. Say hello to Pyenv , an useful utility to manage multiple Python versions, simultaneously. It made the python version management easier than ever. It is used to install, uninstall and switch to multiple different versions of Python.
  • GitHub Predicts Hottest 2018 Open Source Trends
    As the world’s largest repository of open source projects, GitHub is in a unique position to witness what developers are up to. GitHub staff recently sifted through the site’s 2017’s data in order to identify top open source trends they predict will thrive in 2018.
  • What is LLVM? The power behind Swift, Rust, Clang, and more
    New languages, and improvements on existing ones, are mushrooming throughout the develoment landscape. Mozilla’s Rust, Apple’s Swift, Jetbrains’s Kotlin, and many other languages provide developers with a new range of choices for speed, safety, convenience, portability, and power. Why now? One big reason is new tools for building languages—specifically, compilers. And chief among them is LLVM (Low-Level Virtual Machine), an open source project originally developed by Swift language creator Chris Lattner as a research project at the University of Illinois.