Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OOo

Oracle Pledges Support for OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo

pcworld.com (IDG): Oracle sought to dispel any doubts about its commitment to OpenOffice.org on Wednesday, announcing its participation in the ODF Plugfest event in Brussels this week and talking up future development plans for the open source productivity suite.

Also: New Chart features in OpenOffice.org 3.3 Beta (part 2)

New Chart features in OpenOffice.org 3.3 Beta

Filed under
OOo

blogs.sun.com: Arbitrary text shapes and drawing objects now can easily be inserted into Charts.

OpenOffice.org's 10th Anniversary: The Difference a Decade Makes

Filed under
OOo

linux-magazine.com: October 13, 2010 marks the tenth anniversary of the OpenOffice.org project. It's a significant landmark, both for me personally and for free software in general.

Your Office is Saved

Filed under
LibO
OOo
  • Your Office is Saved -- OpenOffice.org Forked
  • The future of OpenOffice.org
  • Oracle ready to go solo with OpenOffice
  • OpenOffice is dead, long live LibreOffice

OpenOffice.org Community announces The Document Foundation

Filed under
LibO
OOo
  • OpenOffice.org Community announces The Document Foundation
  • OpenOffice.org developers move to break ties with Oracle
  • LibreOffice: OpenOffice.org Liberated
  • LibreOffice: The newest member of the ODF family
  • LibreOffice is Born!
  • OpenOffice.org Community announces The Document Foundation
  • OpenOffice files Oracle divorce papers
  • LibreOffice - A fresh page for OpenOffice

OOo4Kids: A workable compromise

Filed under
Software
OOo

linux-magazine.com: I am always of two minds about office suites or applications for children. On the one hand, I can see the value of offering a simplified interface for learning on. On the other hand, I wonder if children shouldn't start with the interface they will be using as adults. OOo4Kids balances these.

Also: Linux .doc to Text Conversions Inadequate

Rebuttal to "Goodbye, OpenOffice. Nice Knowing You."

Filed under
OOo

acrossad.org: I recently read the article "Goodbye, OpenOffice. Nice Knowing You" by Mr. Serdar Yegulalp with great interest. OpenOffice.org has been of particular interest to me of late due to the recent controversy surrounding Oracle's Google lawsuit.

Goodbye, OpenOffice. Nice Knowing You.

Filed under
OOo

earthweb.com: I'm about to do something that will have more than a few people who know me thrashing around and screaming in horror. I'm replacing a free application with one I'm paying money for.

Book review - Learn OpenOffice.org Spreadsheet Macros

Filed under
OOo

pcworld.com: My name is John Dukovich. I've been working with Microsoft Office applications, basically since they came out, and I'm a heavy user of Excel macros. I shied away from OpenOffice Calc for quite a while because initially I heard the macro feature wasn't as good as Excel's. However, when I got my hands on this book, OpenOffice.org Spreadsheet Macro Programming, I was curious and hoped to find I was wrong.

OpenOffice.org: preparing the next ten years

Filed under
OOo
  • OpenOffice.org Conference 2010: preparing the next ten years
  • OOo: Print file format changes on Linux
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

An Everyday Linux User Review Of Elementary OS Loki 0.4

Elementary looks great. It is easy to install, easy to use and the applications are perfectly adequate for basic tasks. The big issue is the package manager. The biggest issue with Ubuntu is the package manager. The fact that somebody has had to go to the effort to create the Ubuntu After Install application shows there is a problem. Why can't Ubuntu or one of these derivatives grasp the bull by the horns and come up with a solution. People like to use Chrome yet all we get is Firefox or some basic equivalent. Chrome works with everything. It is by far the best browser and I don't want to settle for second best. If you don't want to include it as part of the main package manager add a simple tool for installing this and many other applications including Steam. On the whole though the distribution looks good and is simple to use and I do recommend it for the Everyday Linux User. Read more

Canonical Improves Classic Confinement and Aliases Support in Snapd 2.21 Daemon

Canonical's Snappy team is back from the extended Christmas and New Year's holidays, and they've recently announced the release of the Snapd 2.21 Snappy daemon through Michael Vogt, Synaptic and APT developer. Read more

Dell Announces New Ubuntu-Powered Dell Precision Mobile Workstation Line-Up

Following the introduction of the 6th generation Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition mobile workstation back in October 2016, Dell's Barton George is proud to announce the next generation of company's Dell Precision line. Read more

Distributions and Kernels

  • What is your favorite Linux distribution?
    Of all the many questions you might ask an open source enthusiast, none may evoke quite the passionate response as asking which distribution they prefer. People choose a distribution for many reasons, from look and feel to stability, from speed to how it runs on older machines, from the pace of updates to simply which offers the packages they need. Whatever the reason, with so many distributions available, asking which one you use can be seen as a proxy for asking how you choose to interact with your computer.
  • The joy of Just Works
  • Amdocs, Linux Foundation to accelerate service provider, developer adoption of open source ECOMP
    Amdocs and the Linux Foundation have struck up a partnership in an effort to accelerate adoption of the open source Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) platform developed by AT&T.
  • The Age of the Unikernel: 10 Projects to Know
    When it comes to operating systems, container technologies, and unikernels, the trend toward tiny continues. What is a unikernel? It is essentially a pared-down operating system (the unikernel) that can pair with an application into a unikernel application, typically running within a virtual machine. They are sometimes called library operating systems because they include libraries that enable applications to use hardware and network protocols in combination with a set of policies for access control and isolation of the network layer. Containers often come to mind when discussion turns to cloud computing and Linux, but unikernels are doing transformative things, too. Neither containers nor unikernels are brand new. There were unikernel-like systems in the 1990s such as Exokernel, but today popular unikernels include MirageOS and OSv. Unikernel applications can be used independently and deployed across heterogeneous environments. They can facilitate specialized and isolated services and have become widely used for developing applications within a microservices architecture. [...] In this series of articles, we are looking at the projects mentioned in the guide, by category, providing extra insights on how the overall category is evolving. Below, you’ll find a list of several important unikernels and the impact that they are having, along with links to their GitHub repositories, all gathered from the Guide to the Open Cloud:
  • Mesa 17.0 Delayed To Allow For Ivy Bridge OpenGL 4.0
    Mesa 17.0 (formerly known as Mesa 13.1) was supposed to enter its feature freeze last weekend, but that milestone and branching of the code-base didn't happen due to last minute feature work.