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OOo

Oracle Confirms Committment to OpenOffice.org

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OOo

linuxjournal.com: During OpenOffice.org's tenth anniversary, Oracle announced it will participate in ODF Plugfest, one of the conferences aimed at furthering the Open Document Format interoperability, held October 14 - 15 in Brussels.

Microsoft running scared from OpenOffice.org

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Microsoft
OOo
  • Microsoft running scared from OpenOffice.org
  • Microsoft slags off Open Office
  • OOo's put the willies up Microsoft
  • Microsoft Gives its Blessing to OpenOffice.org

Microsoft launches attack on OpenOffice

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Microsoft
OOo

zdnet.com/blog: Microsoft has a long-established practice of disarming competition by not acknowledging it, because acknowledging the competition gives it power. Well, the Redmond giant has changed stance when it comes to OpenOffice and launched a video attack on the free alternative to the Office software suite.

Oracle Pledges Support for OpenOffice.org

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OOo

pcworld.com (IDG): Oracle sought to dispel any doubts about its commitment to OpenOffice.org on Wednesday, announcing its participation in the ODF Plugfest event in Brussels this week and talking up future development plans for the open source productivity suite.

Also: New Chart features in OpenOffice.org 3.3 Beta (part 2)

New Chart features in OpenOffice.org 3.3 Beta

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OOo

blogs.sun.com: Arbitrary text shapes and drawing objects now can easily be inserted into Charts.

OpenOffice.org's 10th Anniversary: The Difference a Decade Makes

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OOo

linux-magazine.com: October 13, 2010 marks the tenth anniversary of the OpenOffice.org project. It's a significant landmark, both for me personally and for free software in general.

Your Office is Saved

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LibO
OOo
  • Your Office is Saved -- OpenOffice.org Forked
  • The future of OpenOffice.org
  • Oracle ready to go solo with OpenOffice
  • OpenOffice is dead, long live LibreOffice

OpenOffice.org Community announces The Document Foundation

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LibO
OOo
  • OpenOffice.org Community announces The Document Foundation
  • OpenOffice.org developers move to break ties with Oracle
  • LibreOffice: OpenOffice.org Liberated
  • LibreOffice: The newest member of the ODF family
  • LibreOffice is Born!
  • OpenOffice.org Community announces The Document Foundation
  • OpenOffice files Oracle divorce papers
  • LibreOffice - A fresh page for OpenOffice

OOo4Kids: A workable compromise

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Software
OOo

linux-magazine.com: I am always of two minds about office suites or applications for children. On the one hand, I can see the value of offering a simplified interface for learning on. On the other hand, I wonder if children shouldn't start with the interface they will be using as adults. OOo4Kids balances these.

Also: Linux .doc to Text Conversions Inadequate

Rebuttal to "Goodbye, OpenOffice. Nice Knowing You."

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OOo

acrossad.org: I recently read the article "Goodbye, OpenOffice. Nice Knowing You" by Mr. Serdar Yegulalp with great interest. OpenOffice.org has been of particular interest to me of late due to the recent controversy surrounding Oracle's Google lawsuit.

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Linux 4.12 RC3, Linux Foundation Project Updates

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    Hey, things continue to look good, and rc3 isn't even very big. I'm hoping there's not another shoe about to drop, but so far this really feels like a nice calm release cycle, despite the size of the merge window. Knock wood. Anyway, rc3 has a little bit of everything. The biggest single change is actually just a documentation update (the intel pstate docs were converted to rst format), so the diffstat actually looks a bit odd with a wuarter just being documentation. There's also some tooling updates (perf and some bpf selftest). But if you ignore those two pieces, it looks pretty normal: two thirds of it being drivers (gpu, nvme, scsi, tty, block), with the remainder being about half networking and haf "misc" (core kernel, header files, XFS, arch updates). Go forth and test, Linus
  • Linux 4.12-rc3 Kernel Released
    Linus Torvalds has announced the third weekly test candidate for the upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel debut. Linus commented of Linux 4.12-rc3 that it isn't a very big release over the prior RCs and so far it's a "nice calm release cycle." The biggest change this past week was actually documentation updates.
  • Linus Torvalds Announced the Third Release Candidate of the Linux 4.12 Kernel
    Even if it's Memorial weekend, Linus Torvalds is on the job announcing the release and immediate availability of the third RC (Release Candidate) milestone of the upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel series.
  • Hyperledger Sawtooth Graduates to Active Status
    We’re happy to share that Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC) has granted the Hyperledger Sawtooth maintainer’s request to advance the project’s status from Incubation to Active. Hyperledger Iroha also graduated today.
  • Stronger Together: How Cloud Foundry Supports Other Communities
    The open source Cloud Foundry application development platform was publicly announced over six years ago, and along the way, we have connected with other projects, adopting technologies from other open source communities as they matured. For example, before Docker was a company or even a project, the Cloud Foundry platform was using Linux containers to isolate deployed applications from one another. Our container implementation wasn’t built in a general purpose way like Docker’s; it wasn’t designed to solve all of the potential use cases for a container runtime. It was designed specifically to support the stateless web applications that Cloud Foundry was initially intended to support, and to do that in a secure, multitenant fashion.

Reasons to use the GNOME 3 desktop environment, cool KDE tweaks, and GNOME integration for Qt based application

  • 11 reasons to use the GNOME 3 desktop environment for Linux
    Late last year, an upgrade to Fedora 25 caused issues with the new version of KDE Plasma that made it difficult for me to get any work done. So I decided to try other Linux desktop environments for two reasons. First, I needed to get my work done. Second, having been using KDE exclusively for many years, I thought it might be time to try some different desktops.
  • Which Linux desktop environment do you prefer?
  • 7 cool KDE tweaks that will change your life
  • Gnome integration for Qt based applications in Flatpak
    Following blog post from Patrick Griffis about new themes support in Flatpak, we started working on supporting this new feature too. Currently wherever you start a Qt application, it would always look like a KDE application or something would be missing, like icons so you would end up with bad experience and mixed feelings. This is going to change now as we now support Gnome in form of icons, widget style and Qt platform theme and with this, when you run a Qt application in Gnome, it will look definitely better and more natively than before. We packaged regular adwaita icons which are used by default in Gnome as extension of freedesktop runtime. For widget style we use adwaita-qt style, which is a Qt style attempting to look like Gtk’s adwaita and the most important part putting this all together is QGnomePlatform, a Qt platform theme which reads your Gnome configuration and applies it to running Qt applications. QGnomePlatform also enforces Qt apps to use adwaita icons and adwaita-qt style by default so that’s another reason why it is important. Both adwaita-qt and QGnomePlatform projects are by the way authored by Martin Bříza, a collegue of mine from Red Hat so if you meet him in person somewhere buy him a beer for that he cares about Qt integration in Gnome :). Now coming to a question how to install this and make it work. Basically all you need to do is install following extensions and you shold be done:

Returning to the Void

Void is an independently developed, rolling release Linux distribution. The Void distribution runs on 32-bit and 64-bit x86 processors as well as several ARM boards including the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone and Cubieboard2. The Void distribution is available in Cinnamon, Enlightenment, LXDE, LXQt, MATE and Xfce editions with some additional desktop environments offered through the project's software repositories. There is also a plain edition which I believe sets up a minimal command line environment. There are a number of features which set Void apart from most other Linux distributions. Void uses the XBPS package manager for working with source and binary packages. Void was an early adopter of OpenBSD's LibreSSL library which acts as a drop-in replacement for the OpenSSL security library. Further, Void has an init implementation called runit which is unusually small and simple. Another interesting feature of Void is the distribution can use one of two C libraries. Most Linux distributions use the glibc library. Void does provide glibc and also offers installation media with the lightweight musl library. I decided to download the Void project's MATE edition which is 637MB in size. Booting from the supplied media brings up a screen where we can choose between starting the distribution's live environment or loading Void into RAM and then launching the desktop environment. The latter option uses more memory, but makes the distribution run faster and frees up the drive or port where our installation media is located. Read more