Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OOo

Why Oracle Wants LibreOffice to Succeed

Filed under
LibO
OOo

itworld.com: This accomplishes two things: those who leave can be replaced by more Oracle-friendly developers. Those who stay will have re-committed themselves to the success of OpenOffice.org, just by staying. Ah, but there's another benefit here left unsaid:

OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 Almost Here - Is It the Last?

Filed under
OOo
  • OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 Almost Here - Is It the Last?
  • The Oracle Fiasco's Impact
  • Introducing: the Simple Java API for ODF

Mass resignations from OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo
  • Mass resignations from OpenOffice.org
  • New: OOo-DEV 3.x Developer Snapshot
  • OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 Release Candidate 3 available

On Open Source and Academic Productivity...

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
OOo

linuxmigrante.blogspot: Yesterday, I finished the analysis of a survey I passed for one of my courses. I used tables, pie graphs, bar graphs, and many of those features people love to see when data analysis is presented. Oh...I also used Open Office to build the whole thing.

Oracle OpenOffice.org vs. TDF LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO
OOo
  • Oracle OpenOffice.org vs. TDF LibreOffice
  • Java Is Under Siege. Will Oracle Let It Burn?
  • OpenOffice.org and the Unnecessary Ultimatum

5 Myths About OpenOffice.org / LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO
OOo
  • 5 Myths About OpenOffice.org / LibreOffice
  • OpenOffice Council Shows LibreOffice Fans the Door
  • OpenOffice.org is dead to me
  • LibreOffice Contributions stats

SVG OOo, LO Nov

Filed under
Interviews
OOo
  • First Stable Release Of Libre Office In Late November
  • Finally! SVG Coming to OpenOffice.org

Charles H. Schulz Leaving OOo Project

Filed under
LibO
OOo

standardsandfreedom.net: Today is a special day. I feel both sad and relieved, happy and somewhat disgusted. I have officially resigned from my all my duties, roles and positions inside the OpenOffice.org project.

Oracle, OpenOffice.org, LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO
OOo

blogs.gnome.org: First, when reading the minutes, it’s worth noting that this was not a voted decision. At 21:50, Louis Suarez-Potts proposed “that the TDF members of the CC consider the points those of us who have not joined TDF have made about conflict of interest and confusion [and] resign their offices, so as to remove the apparent conflict of interest their current representational roles produce”.

OpenOffice Compatibility

Filed under
OOo

computerworld.com: Ninthchamber asked the Office & Business Software forum why OpenOffice files don't always open in Microsoft Office.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

A tour of Google's 2016 open source releases

Open source software enables Google to build things quickly and efficiently without reinventing the wheel, allowing us to focus on solving new problems. We stand on the shoulders of giants, and we know it. This is why we support open source and make it easy for Googlers to release the projects they're working on internally as open source. We've released more than 20-million lines of open source code to date, including projects such as Android, Angular, Chromium, Kubernetes, and TensorFlow. Our releases also include many projects you may not be familiar with, such as Cartographer, Omnitone, and Yeoman. Read more

Viewing Linux Logs from the Command Line

At some point in your career as a Linux administrator, you are going to have to view log files. After all, they are there for one very important reason...to help you troubleshoot an issue. In fact, every seasoned administrator will immediately tell you that the first thing to be done, when a problem arises, is to view the logs. And there are plenty of logs to be found: logs for the system, logs for the kernel, for package managers, for Xorg, for the boot process, for Apache, for MySQL… For nearly anything you can think of, there is a log file. Read more

At Long Last, Linux Gets Dynamic Tracing

When the Linux kernel version 4.9 will be released next week, it will come with the last pieces needed to offer to some long-awaited dynamic thread-tracing capabilities. As the keepers of monitoring and debugging software start using these new kernel calls, some of which have been added to the Linux kernel over the last two years, they will be able to offer much more nuanced, and easier to deploy, system performance tools, noted Brendan Gregg, a Netflix performance systems engineer and author of DTrace Tools, in a presentation at the USENIX LISA 2016 conference, taking place this week in Boston. Read more