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OOo

20 things we'd change about OpenOffice.org

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techradar.com: OpenOffice.org is a huge lumbering beast. Here are 20 things we'd change about it to make it better.

Open office dilemma: OpenOffice.org vs. LibreOffice

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infoworld.com: Dueling open source alternatives to Microsoft Office match word processors, spreadsheets, and much more; which one should you choose?

New OpenOffice.org Suite: Adequate, but Uninspiring

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eweek.com: The open-source office-productivity suite appears doomed for mediocrity.

What an office suite should look like

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dedoimedo.com: In between Web apps, which tend to be minimalistic, children-oriented stripped-down versions of popular programs and massively decorated KDE-centric office suites, which probably represents the far end of the spectrum, the common user will have a tough time choosing the best program for writing documents and presenting stuff. But making the right choice for your favorite software is only the beginning of the problem.

OpenOffice.org vs. LibreOffice

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earthweb.com: On September 28, 2010, LibreOffice was announced as a fork of the OpenOffice.org office suite. However, it was only last week that the two rivals released their 3.3 versions, and users had the chance to see whether the differences in the culture of the projects made any difference in the code.

OpenOffice.org 3.3

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zdnet.co.uk: This is a welcome update, but it's definitely a point release: unless you're looking for an alternative to Microsoft Office on financial or philosophical grounds, 3.3 may not be the version to make you switch.

OpenOffice.org 3.3 Released to Deaf Ears

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ostatic.com: One day after the announcement of LibreOffice 3.3, Oracle released the free version of OpenOffice.org. Perhaps it was due to the lack of fanfare, but it seems this release was met with a collective indifference.

OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 released

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openoffice.org: The newest Release of OpenOffice.org is out now and available for download. New things are described in detail in the Feature Overview. The technical Release Notes are also available.

Oracle, LibreOffice: ideally a co-opetition, not competition

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zdnet.com: Choice is great. It’s one of the key selling points of open source — a guarantee that no one company can monopolize a software category, at least illegally.

OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice Release Candidates Duke It Out

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linuxjournal.com: Oracle-owned OpenOffice.org and independent LibreOffice are both nearing their freely available 3.3.0 versions and show their wares with recent release candidates.

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‘No Company Is So Important Its Existence Justifies Setting Up a Police State’

You’re talking about very — about specific manifestations, and in some cases in ways that presuppose a weak solution. What is data privacy? The term implies that if a company collects data about you, it should somehow protect that data. But I don’t think that’s the issue. I think the problem is that it collects data about you period. We shouldn’t let them do that. I won’t let them collect data about me. I refuse to use the ones that would know who I am. There are unfortunately some areas where I can’t avoid that. I can’t avoid even for a domestic flight giving the information of who I am. That’s wrong. You shouldn’t have to identify yourself if you’re not crossing a border and having your passport checked. With prescriptions, pharmacies sell the information about who gets what sort of prescription. There are companies that find this out about people. But they don’t get much of a chance to show me ads because I don’t use any sites in a way that lets them know who I am and show ads accordingly. So I think the problem is fundamental. Companies are collecting data about people. We shouldn’t let them do that. The data that is collected will be abused. That’s not an absolute certainty, but it’s a practical, extreme likelihood, which is enough to make collection a problem. A database about people can be misused in four ways. First, the organization that collects the data can misuse the data. Second, rogue employees can misuse the data. Third, unrelated parties can steal the data and misuse it. That happens frequently, too. And fourth, the state can collect the data and do really horrible things with it, like put people in prison camps. Which is what happened famously in World War II in the United States. And the data can also enable, as it did in World War II, Nazis to find Jews to kill. In China, for example, any data can be misused horribly. But in the U.S. also, you’re looking at a CIA torturer being nominated to head the CIA, and we can’t assume that she will be rejected. So when you put this together with the state spying that Snowden told us about, and with the Patriot Act that allows the FBI to take almost any database of personal data without even talking to a court. And what you see is, for companies to have data about you is dangerous. And I’m not interested in discussing the privacy policies that these companies have. First of all, privacy policies are written so that they appear to promise you some sort of respect for privacy, while in fact having such loopholes that the company can do anything at all. But second, the privacy policy of the company doesn’t do anything to stop the FBI from taking all that data every week. Anytime anybody starts collecting some data, if the FBI thinks it’s interesting, it will grab that data. And we also know that the FBI and other such agencies are inclined to label protesters as terrorists. So that way they can use laws that were ostensibly adopted to protect us from terrorists to threaten a much larger number of us than any terrorist could. Read more Also: Numerical Analysis Software Global Market Analysis & Forecast: Analytica, Matlab, GNU Octave, Plotly, FlexPro

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