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OOo

It's time to make LibreOffice and OpenOffice one again

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OOo

Let's talk about OpenOffice. More than likely you've already read, countless times, that Apache OpenOffice is near the end. The last stable iteration was 4.1.2 (released October, 2015) and a recent major security flaw took a month to patch. A lack of coders has brought development to a creeping crawl. And then, the worst possible news hit the ether; the project suggested users switch to MS Office (or LibreOffice).

For whom the bells tolls? The bell tolls for thee, OpenOffice.

I'm going to say something that might ruffle a few feathers. Are you ready for it?

The end of OpenOffice will be a good thing for open source and for users.

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Rumors of OpenOffice Demise Exaggerated

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LibreOffice spun out from OpenOffice in the aftermath of the Oracle/Sun acquisition. It was one of many projects including Hudson/Jenkins and MySQL/MariaDB that got forked. To the best my knowledge while all those forks have strong user bases and have become the default tools in their respective domains - the original projects persist.

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State of OpenOffice

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OOo
  • What Would OpenOffice Retirement Involve? (long)

    I have regularly observed that the Apache OpenOffice project has limited capacity for sustaining the project in an energetic manner. It is also my considered opinion that there is no ready supply of developers who have the capacity, capability, and will to supplement the roughly half-dozen volunteers holding the project together. It doesn't matter what the reasons for that might be.

  • OpenOffice In Danger of Shutting Down, Project VP Warns

    The future isn't look bright for OpenOffice, the open-source office suite run by the Apache foundation.

  • Redesigning Tor, Goodbye OpenOffice & More…

    Building Tor to a next new level: Tor is still safe, but there are cracks in it’s armor. You can still safely cruise the net through The Onion Router with your identity kept secret — most of the time but not always. Thankfully, for the time being that “not always” stands at about one in several million, but organizations like the NSA and the Brit’s GCHQ have been working at chipping away at those odds to turn them more in their favor.

ODF and Document Freedom

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LibO
OOo
  • The Document Foundation and the FSFE strengthen their relationship

    The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE, https://fsfe.org) is joining the Advisory Board of The Document Foundation. At the same time, The Document Foundation is becoming an associated organisation of the FSFE (https://fsfe.org/associates/associates.en.html).

    The Free Software Foundation Europe’s aim is to help people control technology instead of the other way around. However, this is a goal which no single organisation can achieve on its own. Associated organizations are entities that share the FSFE’s vision and support the foundation and Free Software in general by encouraging people to use and develop Free Software, by helping organisations understand how Free Software contributes to freedom, transparency and self-determination, and by removing barriers to Free Software adoption.

  • I Spotted ODF in the Wild this Week... Twice!

    This week has been full of surprises. The new semester has started and with that, much of what used to be paperwork is becoming digital files. When I entered the platform to obtain the lists of my students in the courses I'm currently teaching, I realized that it now had two options to download such lists: "as a pdf file" or "as a spreadsheet."

    Since I didn't want to have anything to do with .xslx, I went for the pdf.

    But later, when I told Mechatotoro about it, he entered the platform and gave "spreadsheet" a try.

    "I love these people!," I heard him say.

LibreOffice and OpenOffice

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OOo

LibreOffice and OpenOffice Reviews

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Reviews
OOo
  • Review: LibreOffice 5.2 — solid, unpolished alternative

    LibreOffice is an office suite that rivals Microsoft Office yet costs nothing. There are versions for Windows, OS X and Linux along with a portable edition that works from a USB drive.

    If you’re on a tight budget and have a Windows PC, LibreOffice is by far the best alternative to Office. It is more complete than Google Apps and leaves Apache OpenOffice for dead.

    OS X users have a good alternative free option. Apple’s iWorks suite is free with new Macs. Even so, you might prefer LibreOffice because it has better Microsoft Office compatibility.

    LibreOffice looks and feels more like Microsoft Office than iWorks. If you know Microsoft Office, moving to LibreOffice will be less of a wrench. It also includes a database unlike either the OS X version of Microsoft Office or iWorks. If you need a simple database and have no budget, LibreOffice would be ideal.

    Some Linux distributions include LibreOffice either as standard or as an optional download. It’s a more straightforward choice than using a tool like Wine to run Microsoft Office.

  • Apache OpenOffice 4.1.2 Review

    Every computer needs applications to do any work, and that means more money. Except for open-source software, like OpenOffice, which is free. In the case of OpenOffice, the free software looks and acts like Microsoft Office circa 2003, and includes a word processor, spreadsheet and presentation creator. Not only does OpenOffice look and feel like Office, but it also reads and writes Office files so well that most users could exchange files between the two suites and no one would know the difference.

  • Best Microsoft Office Alternatives 2016

Open Standards, Move Over

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OSS
OOo

Back in 2003, over 800 blog posts ago, I decided to launch something I called the Standards Blog. Not surprisingly, it focused mostly on the development, implementation and importance of open standards. But I also wrote about other areas of open collaboration, such as open data, open research, and of course, open source software. Over time, there were more and more stories about open source worth writing, as well as pieces on the sometimes tricky intersection of open standards and open source.

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Document Freedom Day, World Standards Day 2016

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OOo
  • Happy Document Freedom Day

    Today is Document Freedom Day. As in the past 8 years we celebrate DFD on the last Wednesday of March all around the world. While the date is recommended this year DFD is being celebrated from March 16th to April 5th so far (we’ re still getting new registration as of this writing) .

  • Celebrate Document Freedom Day on March 30

    The FSFE has handed over Document Freedom Day to us earlier this year and while it took us a bit of time to get familiar with the way the current DFD website handles the events registration we have been steadily gathering more and more locations all over the world. So Document Freedom Day is happening on the last Wednesday of March, which is March 30th this year and Latin America seems very active in promoting Open Standards. We are very happy to meet new people thanks to the effort and will also celebrate our local DFD in Phnom Penh but slightly later on April 5th. If you are in the area please drop by, and if not please check the Document Freedom Day website for an event in your area. Happy DFD!

  • Paper Competition Announced for U.S. Celebration of World Standards Day 2016

    World Standards Day is celebrated annually around the world to increase awareness of the role that standards play in the global economy. To help celebrate the importance of standards, SES - The Society for Standards Professionals and the U.S. Celebration of World Standards Day Planning Committee co-sponsor an annual paper competition for individuals in the U.S. standards community. The 2016 paper competition winners will be announced and given their awards at the U.S. Celebration of World Standards Day, which will be held this year on October 27, 2016, at the Fairmont Hotel in Washington, D.C.

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More in Tux Machines

Entrapment and Digital Prisons (Microsoft GitHub and Sonos)

  • Microsoft open-sources ONNX Runtime model to speed up Google’s BERT

    This is the most recent leap forward in natural language for Microsoft, but not its first attempt to make Google’s BERT better. About a year ago, Microsoft AI researchers also released MT-DNN, a Transformer-based model that set new high performance standards for the GLUE language model performance benchmark.

  • GitHub now uses AI to recommend open issues in project repositories [Ed: Microsoft now uses mindless buzzwords like "HEY HI!!!" (AI) to market its proprietary software trap]
  • AVSystem Releases a New Version of Open-Source Anjay LwM2M SDK

    AVSystem is pleased to announce that an open-source version of Anjay 2.2.1 has just been released on GitHub.

  • See you later, Sonos: Meet the open-source audio system that would perhaps perhaps no longer ever die

    This week, Sonos launched — after which therefore retracted — that it would perhaps perchance ruin-of-life a assortment of popular audio streaming products made by the corporate at some level of its first 10 years in alternate. Sonos had made up our minds to complete improve on yarn of these first-skills products lack sufficient processing vitality and storage to accommodate contemporary aspects. Regardless that there delight in been many enhancements in presents, miniaturization, and general efficiency, loudspeaker skills has no longer fundamentally changed since its introduction in the 1920s. Offered that they’re no longer inclined outside their efficiency specifications, the drivers and cones can closing a long time. Diverse elements inner speakers encompass magnets constituted of ferrous and uncommon earth presents that attain no longer expire.

  • So long, Sonos: Meet the open-source audio system that will never die

    Sonos had decided to end support because these first-generation products lack sufficient processing power and storage to accommodate new features. Although there have been many improvements in materials, miniaturization, and overall performance, loudspeaker technology has not fundamentally changed since its introduction in the 1920s. Provided that they aren't used outside their performance specifications, the drivers and cones can last decades. Other components inside speakers include magnets made out of ferrous and rare earth materials that do not expire. In addition to solid-state MOSFET-based signal amplifiers, self-powered speakers also contain transformers, which are made of solid cores of metal wound with fine conductive wire. Updates to transformer technology in recent years include Gallium Nitride (GaN), which reduces heat and overall footprint. These components, particularly MOSFETs do not "go bad" unless they are abused, such as being subjected to high temperatures, very high voltages, or transient power spikes, which can be mitigated by a simple surge suppressor or power conditioner.

FUD and Openwashing Leftovers

  • Kevin Owocki on Gitcoin, Controversy and the Future of Open Source Funding

    Some of that controversy has been from outside the Ethereum community, pointing to Consensys and Ethereum Foundation support as an example of centralization. Some of the controversy has come from within, as debates rage about what is or isn’t an acceptable use of “public” resources.

  • Sonatype: Secure code with less hassle

    Software development has changed drastically over the past decade. Take a 22-year-old graduate with a degree in computer science. At one time, they would start off testing code, then start to write code line-by-line. Today, 80% of applications are developed using open source software. Instead of laboriously worrying over each caret and comma, code is grabbed and assembled. This can make for quick iterations and rapid project completion.

  • Lyft's open source asset tracking tool simplifies security

    The modern map -- in fact, any map since the Age of Sail -- serves an important purpose in navigation. Exploration feats, such as Magellan's circumnavigation of the globe, Lewis and Clark's American expedition, or more recent excursions to the Earth's polar regions, would not have been possible without mapping knowledge and ability. A cursory look at ancient or medieval history shows that early maps, prior to their use for navigation, served a different purpose entirely. The map in the 15th century manuscript La Fleur des Histoires was by no means intended to be geographically accurate. Instead, it was designed to convey a concept or idea -- in this case, the separation of ruling powers by region. However, the real power of mapmaking -- that is, for navigation -- would not be realized for generations.

  • vChain, the Makers of the CodeNotary Open Source Code Trust Solution With Over 9 Million Monthly Customer Integrity Verifications Raises $7 Million in Series A to Secure Today’s DevOps Process

    vChain, the leading trust and integrity company, announces the close of a $7M Series A investment round. Elaia, a leading European tech venture fund, led the new investment round which includes also other notable investors such as Swiss-based Bluwat and Acequia Capital (Seattle, USA). vChain was founded in late 2018 and released its first product in April 2019.

  • Open source licence series - WhiteSource: permissive is winning, but is there a hurt factor?
  • Open source licence series - Instaclustr: Is open core a rotten deal?

    Ideally, open source software should be, well, free and open.

  • Open source licence series - Percona: is the battle won, or is this a different war?

    Recently, the Cryptographic Autonomy License (CAL) was submitted for OSI consideration. As Holo’s co-founder Arthur Brock explains in his blog post, his goal is to protect end-user privacy and autonomy. Restrictions in this case focus not on whom, but how the software should be used. While many on the OSI board seem to support the licence, Bruce Perens, OSI co-founder and the person who drafted the original Open Source Definition (OSD), resigned from OSI saying, “… it seems to me that the organisation is rather enthusiastically headed toward accepting a licence that isn’t freedom-respecting. Fine, do it without me, please.”

  • Open Source Wood Innovation Award Given to an Active Member
  • Open Source Plant Material And Intellectual Property

    Today we hear the term “open source” more and more. It is a term that is most commonly identified with software and firmware development out of the Silicon Valley. However, the term is becoming common in the plant industry.

  • Garadget review: Open your garage door with open-source technology

    There’s no scheduling system nor (surprisingly) a logging system built into Garadget, but it does support Alexa, Google Assistant, SmartThings, IFTTT, and a whole host of lesser-known third-party tools, but all of that will invariably force you into the system’s forums again. For example, there are two Garadget Alexa skills, one for if you want to say “smart garage” and one for if you want to say “Garadget” to invoke the skill. Setting up a connection to SmartThings requires using Samsung’s developer tools.

Linux Foundation: CHIPS Alliance, Cloud Foundry Foundation, Kubernetes News

  • Intel joins CHIPS Alliance to promote Advanced Interface Bus (AIB) as an open standard

    CHIPS Alliance, the leading consortium advancing common and open hardware for interfaces, processors and systems, today announced industry leading chipmaker Intel as its newest member. Intel is contributing the Advanced Interface Bus (AIB) to CHIPS Alliance to foster broad adoption.

  • Intel Joins CHIPS Alliance, Contributes Advanced Interface Bus

    Intel this week became a member of CHIPS Alliance, an industry consortium that is working to accelerate the development of open source SoCs (and SiPs) for various applications. As part of their membership, Intel has also contributed its Advanced Interface Bus to the group, giving developers access to the bus and thus the means to interoperate with Intel (and other) chips that will be using it. Designed for use with system-in-packages (SiPs) devices, Intel’s AIB is a high-bandwidth, low-power, die-to-die PHY level standard that uses a clock forwarded parallel data transfer mechanism (akin that used by modern DDR DRAM interfaces). The technology is agnostic to manufacturing processes and packaging technology, so it can be used to connect a wide variety of chips/chiplets using different types of packages, including Intel’s own EMIB, TSMC’s CoWoS, or other 2.5D technologies from numerous vendors. Intel’s AIB has been available to third parties on a royalty-free basis for a while now, so contributing the technology to CHIPS Alliance is the next step for Intel in increasing its adoption. By making AIB available to a very broad group of chip designers, Intel is encouraging development of an ecosystem of chiplets that can later be used with its own CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, and other components to build special-purpose multi-die SiPs.

  • Cloud Foundry Foundation Announces 2020 Summits in North America and Europe

    Cloud Foundry Foundation, home to open source projects helping build the future of cloud applications, today announced Cloud Foundry Summits for North America and Europe, now co-located with the Linux Foundation's Open Source Summits. Cloud Foundry NA Summit will take place on Thursday, June 25, 2020, in Austin, Texas and Cloud Foundry EU Summit will take place on Thursday, October 29, 2020, in Dublin, Ireland. Early bird registration for Cloud Foundry NA Summit is now open.

  • Octarine Open Sources the Kubernetes Common Configuration Scoring System and kube-scan

    Octarine, the continuous Kubernetes security company that simplifies DevSecOps, today announced the release of two new open source projects: the Kubernetes Common Configuration Scoring System (KCCSS), a new framework for rating security risks associated with misconfigurations, and kube-scan, a workload and assessment tool that scans Kubernetes configurations and settings to identify and rank potential vulnerabilities in applications within minutes.

  • Octarine releases open-source security scanning tools for Kubernetes

    Octarine, a startup that helps automate security of Kubernetes workloads, released an open-source scanning tool today. The tool, which is called Kube-scan, is designed to help developers understand the level of security risk in their Kubernetes clusters. The company is also open-sourcing a second tool called The Kubernetes Common Configuration Scoring System, or KCCSS for short, which is the underlying configuration framework used in Kube-scan. As Ocatrine’s head of product Julien Sobrier points out, there are 30 security settings in Kubernetes, and Kube-scan can help you see where you might be vulnerable on any one of them, measured on a scale of 0-10, with 10 being extremely vulnerable.

  • SReview kubernetes update

    About a week and a half ago, I mentioned that I'd been working on making SReview, my AGPLv3 video review and transcode system work from inside a Kubernetes cluster. I noted at the time that while I'd made it work inside minikube, it couldn't actually be run from within a real Kubernetes cluster yet, mostly because I misunderstood how Kubernetes works, and assumed you could just mount the same Kubernetes volume from multiple pods, and share data that way (answer: no you can't). The way to fix that is to share the data not through volumes, but through something else. That would require that the individual job containers download and upload files somehow. I had a look at how the Net::Amazon::S3 perl module works (answer: it's very simple really) and whether it would be doable to add a transparent file access layer to SReview which would access files either on the local file system, or an S3 service (answer: yes).

Linux 5.6 Preview

  • Linux 5.6 Is Looking Like It Will Be Spectacular With A Long List Of Features

    Linux 5.5 is likely to be released later today and with that are many new features. But as soon as 5.5 is released it marks the opening of the Linux 5.6 merge window and this next kernel has us particularly exciting... It's certainly shaping up to be one of the most exciting kernel cycles in recent times with many blockbuster features and improvements.

  • Intel SST Core-Power Support Ready For Linux 5.6

    Earlier this month I wrote about Intel SST Core-Power patches as part of Intel's Speed Select's functionality for more control over per-core power/frequency behavior based upon the software running on each core. The "core-power" profile support appears ready now for Linux 5.6. While Intel Speed Select Technology support was added to Linux last year as one of the new features with Cascade Lake, the "Core-Power" (or SST-CP) profile hadn't been wired up in full to this point. Intel SST-CP allows for dealing with per-core priorities when encountering power constraints.