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Obits

PCLinuxOS Screenshot Showcase, Member Spotlight and Obituary for Sproggy

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PCLOS
Obits
  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: rgradle

    PCLinuxOS (KDE) is currently running on my desktop machine (ASUS m/b with AMD A10 processor), and on an HP laptop computer (AMD Phenom II/Mate). Performance on the desktop machine is great, but a bit slow on the laptop. I do some video editing for my church on the desktop machine using Kdenlive, a native Linux application that is very powerful. I also do some graphics development for the church using GIMP. Very powerful, but long learning curve with GIMP. Now I wish I had paid more attention to the GIMP articles that appeared in the PCLinuxOS magazine some time ago. I have a Windows 10 virtual machine on my desktop computer for a few applications that will not run under Linux. My wife, a Windows user from way back, was right at home on her KDE desktop in no time at all. When people try to tell me how complicated Linux is to use, I always bring up my my wife's experience as an example of how easy Linux, and especially PCLinuxOS, is to use.

    One of the things I always appreciate about PCLinuxOS is that the software is well thought out, meaning that the updates generally work well and without problem. This is really a nod to those to maintain the software in the repository. Thank you, thank you. Also, I always appreciate the help available on the forum. Even when I have made newbie errors, someone is always willing to provide direction to get me on the path forward. Just outstanding.

  • R.I.P, Sproggy! You Will Be Missed!

    On December 23, 2019, our beloved PCLinuxOS family member, Sproggy, lost his battle with cancer.

    [...]

    When I first joined the PCLinuxOS forum, Sproggy was a moderator. We both hit it off pretty early on. My interactions with him increased a lot when I took over the editor's role for the magazine. We would chat frequently -- usually daily -- in the magazine's IRC channel on FreeNode, then called #pclinuxos.mag (it's now #pclosmag).

    We would chat about everything and anything. We'd talk about family, politics (particularly anytime there was a General Election coming up in the U.K.), world events, personal trials and tribulations, work, what's for dinner, and sometimes just nonsense. There was hardly a topic we didn't touch on. At that time, the magazine's IRC channel was a hopping place. Joble, Hootiegibbon, CSolis, grnich, ms_meme, AndrezjL, Meemaw, myself and many others frequently hung out there. Sproggy would join in on the conversations with just about everyone.

RIP, Chuck Peddle

Filed under
Obits

I never got the pleasure to have met him in person, but virtually any desktop computer owes a debt to him. Not only the computers using the the 6502 microprocessor he designed, but because the 6502 was so inexpensive (especially compared against the Intel and Motorola chips it competed with) that it made the possibility of a computer in everybody's home actually feasible. Here just in the very room I'm typing this, there is a Commodore 128D, several Commodore SX-64s (with the 8502 and 6510 respectively, variants of the 6502 with on-chip I/O ports), a Commodore KIM-1, a blue-label PET 2001, an Apple IIgs (technically with a 65816, the later WDC 16-bit variant), an Atari 2600 (6507, with a reduced address bus), an Atari Lynx (with the CMOS WDC WD65SC02), and an NEC TurboExpress (Hudson HuC6280, another modified WDC 65C02, with a primitive MMU). The 6502 appeared in fact in the Nintendo Famicom/NES (Ricoh 2A03 variant) and Super Nintendo (65816) and the vast majority of Commodore home computers before the Amiga, plus the Atari 8-bit and Apple II lines. For that matter, the Commodore 1541s and 1571s separate and built-into the 128D and SX-64s have 6502 CPUs too. Most impactful was probably its appearance in the BBC Micro series which was one of the influences on the now-ubiquitous ARM architecture.

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A Tragic Loss

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Obits

This past month, we here at CodeWeavers and the wider Wine community suffered a devastating loss. Our friend and colleague, Józef Kucia, died at the age of 28.

Józef first contributed to Wine in March of 2012, showing remarkable skill with Wine’s D3D technology. He became a key contributor to Wine, submitting over 2,500 patches. He also contributed to other open source projects including Mesa and Debian. Józef founded and led the vkd3d project and provided insight and guidance to the Vulkan working group.

Józef joined CodeWeavers in 2015, and quickly became one of our most valued employees.

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Sad News - Martin Schwidefsky

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Obits

We are devastated by the tragic death of Martin Schwidefsky who died
in an accident last Saturday.

Martin was the most significant contributor to the initial s390 port
of the Linux Kernel and later the maintainer of the s390 architecture
backend. His technical expertise as well as his mentoring skills were
outstanding. Martin was well known for his positive mindset and his
willingness to help.

He will be greatly missed.

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Goodbye Joe

Filed under
Development
Obits

Joe Armstrong is mainly known as the father of Erlang, and the Erlang family has always been relatively small and closely knit. Anyone whose first Erlang conference (usually Erlang Factory, Erlang User Conference, or CodeBEAM) had Joe in the attendance would have a similar reaction. There was a feeling of awe about how accessible the community was. Here you were, and big names like Joe and Robert—who everyone knew by their first names—were right around the same room, friendly, and willing to talk to anybody. You'd feel like you were welcome no matter who you were.

Today, we've learned of Joe's passing away. I wasn't a super close friend of Joe, but I have known him and talked with him at various conferences over the last ten years or so. He's unsurprisingly been a huge influence in my career, and so I thought I should write this little post about him and his impact. My words can't give justice to the man he was, but I felt I needed to write this up.

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The Debian Project mourns the loss of Innocent de Marchi

Filed under
Debian
Obits

The Debian Project recently learned that it has lost a member of its community. Innocent de Marchi passed a few months ago.

Innocent was a math teacher and a free software developer. One of his passions was tangram puzzles, which led him to write a tangram-like game that he later packaged and maintained in Debian. Soon his contributions expanded to other areas, and he also worked as a tireless translator into Catalan.

The Debian Project honors his good work and strong dedication to Debian and Free Software. Innocent's contributions will not be forgotten, and the high standards of his work will continue to serve as an inspiration to others.

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openSUSE Board Alumni Peter T. Linnell died on March 18th

Filed under
SUSE
Obits

Peter was widely known as founder of Scribus, the Libre Graphics Meeting and enthusiastic contributor to countless other Free Software projects. For openSUSE he took over responsibility as an active member of our package review team and has served as openSUSE Board member twice, from 2011-2012 and 2014-2016. Peter passed away a week ago after lengthy battle with cancer, he is survived by his wife Pauline and his daughter Stella. His obituary mentions ways to honor his life.

We will always remember Peter as fellow tinkerer, with an boundless passion to understand the inner workings and meanings of software and people. Farewell Peter, you’ll be missed by the openSUSE Community.

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Obituary: Peter T. Linnell

R.I.P. mrdocs (1963–2019)

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Obits

The Scribus Team is deeply saddened to announce the loss of our friend and colleague Peter Linnell who in the end lost his long battle against cancer.

It is no understatement to say that without Peter Scribus wouldn’t be what it is today. It was Peter who spotted the potential of Franz Schmid’s initially humble Python program and, as a pre-press consultant at the time, contacted Franz to make him aware of the necessities of PostScript and PDF support, among other things. Peter also wrote the first version of the Scribus online documentation, which resulted in his nickname “mrdocs” in IRC and elsewhere. Until recently, and despite his detoriating health, Peter continued to be involved in building and releasing new Scribus versions.

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The Debian Project mourns the loss of Lucy Wayland

Filed under
Debian
Obits

The Debian Project sadly announces that it has lost a member of its community. Lucy Wayland passed recently.

Lucy was a contributor within the Cambridge (UK) Debian community, helping to organise the Cambridge Mini-DebConf since several years.

She was a strong fighter for diversity and inclusion, and participated in the creation of the Debian Diversity Team, working on increasing the visibility of under-represented groups and providing support with respect to diversity issues within the community.

The Debian Project honours her good work and strong dedication to Debian and Free Software. Lucy's contributions will not be forgotten, and the high standards of her work will continue to serve as an inspiration to others.

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Mourning Shaohua Li

Filed under
Linux
Obits

I've got some very sad news to share with you - over Christmas, Shaohua
Li passed away after battling cancer for most of last year.

As you know, Shaohua acted as the maintainer for md. He remained
dedicated to that through the difficult times. With his passing, we
obviously have a void that needs to be filled.

For now, I'll act as interim maintainer for md until we can find a good
permanent solution. I'll queue up reviewed patches in a separate branch,
in the block tree, and help review fixes. I'm subscribed to linux-raid,
but please do CC me as well.

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The 10 Best Raspberry Pi Stores Available in the Market

Raspberry Pi is the most discussed single-board computer nowadays, which is highly applied in the development of IoT. It was made to make computing more accessible, and we can say it succeeded quite thoroughly. Now, with the emerging importance of the Pi, more and more people are getting interested in buying it and looking for the finest and authentic Raspberry Pi Stores around them. If you are one of them, let’s say you have reached the best place to get your answer! [...] The Pi Hut’s Raspberry Pi superstore started its journey in 2012 with selling SD cards only. Since then, they have been upgrading gradually and finally reached this point where they are regarded as #1 Raspberry Pi Store. You will find all the latest and finest Raspberry Pi accessories and add-ons. Besides their excellent quality products, they offer fast and caring customer service. Moreover, their website provides a Raspberry Pi compatibility checker on each of the product’s page that allows you to know which product fit well with which Pi model. Read more

today's howtos

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Mageia (mysql-connector-java), openSUSE (chromium, curl, libqt4, and singularity), Red Hat (bash and kernel), SUSE (python-pip and python3), and Ubuntu (busybox, ceph, freeimage, libofx, libpam-tacplus, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-azure, linux-azure-4.15, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-4.15, linux-gke-4.15, linux-hwe, linux-oem, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-oracle, novnc, and tnef).

  • Microsoft secures backend server that leaked Bing data [Ed: "No personal user data was leaked in the incident," says ZDNet about a Microsoft security incident, just because the liars from Microsoft said so. Did ZDNet check to verify? No. Reprinting lies.]

    Microsoft has suffered a rare cyber-security lapse earlier this month when the company's IT staff accidentally left one of Bing's backend servers exposed online.

  • No security audit done on Chinese smartphones- IT ministry

    Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology, Government of India, today clarified that it has not conducted any sort of study to check if Chinese-made smartphones used in India are sending sensitive data to their country of origin. “Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (MeitY) has not conducted any such study,” said Minister of State Sanjay Dhotre, in response to a question by Rajya Sabha MP Vivek Tankha. [...] While the Gnu Public License, which governs the Linux Operating System, requires anyone who makes changes to the code to disclose the changes publicly, such a requirement is not there for BSD, and therefore, for Android. Unlike GPL, the BSD license allows any company to take the code, alter it in any way they want, and not disclose the changes to anyone.

  • No, Moving Your SSH Port Isn’t Security by Obscurity

    In short, you just made it harder for the enemy to successfully attack you by giving them a resource problem. Sure, they can check under every rock in Central Park and eventually find the package, but you’ll be done with the mission by then.

    Obscurity doesn’t apply if people know the mechanism you’re using and they simply have a resource problem. Having a known defense but a hidden key is a well-established part of good security, and it has been for millennia.

GNU/Linux-Compatible Devices

  • Raspberry Pi turns retro radio into interactive storyteller
  • Microchip graphics toolkit for Linux-on-Arm

    Called Ensemble Graphics Toolkit, it is a no-cost and royalty-fre open-source C++ suite based on the permissive Apache 2.0 open-source license. It works with the company’s chips, system-in-package and system-on-module products. “By taking advantage of underlying hardware acceleration, including graphics controllers and video decoders when available, the toolkit provides a high-performance user experience on low and mid-range graphical displays up to XGA [1,024 x 768] resolution,” according to the company. “Ensemble Graphics Toolkit and Linux can be optimised for boot times of under three seconds from cold reset that is required for applications such as automotive dashboard clusters.”

  • Intel Rocket Lake and Xe DG1 GPU now have Linux support

    Intel has updated its Compute Runtime to support its upcoming Rocket Lake desktop processors and Intel DG1 graphics based on its Xe GPU architecture. Overall, this can be seen as a sign that things are moving at a steady pace with Intel’s 11th generation core CPUs and discrete graphics.

  • Work smarter and harder!

    We’re decided to focus on how an open source smart home office looks and runs with a bit of help from the Raspberry Pi. From setting up a low-overhead video conferencing system to collaborative document editing and sharing, to more mundane smart-home control options, this is what happens when we leave Jonni to his own devices at home for six months! Hopefully you’ll find something that will be of genuine use around your new working-from-home home office, or at least something for which use a spare Pi!