Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reiser

Reiser4/Reiser5 Updated For Linux 5.8

Filed under
Reiser

Edward Shishkin continues pushing ahead with not only maintaining the existing out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system code but also developing Reiser5 seemingly without any major corporate support. Reiser4 and the experimental Reiser5 file-system code were updated on Monday for Linux 5.8 kernel compatibility.

The Reiser4 kernel driver along with the unstable Reiser5 kernel code saw new patch releases for supporting them on the Linux 5.8 stable kernel (Linux 5.8.1 target to be exact).

Read more

Reiser4/Reiser5 Updated For Linux 5.7 Kernel Compatibility

Filed under
Reiser

It was just over a week ago that Reiser4 was updated for Linux 5.6 support while now it's been updated for the newly-minted Linux 5.7 stable kernel along with updating the experimental Reiser5 file-system for this latest kernel series.

Uploaded today by Edward Shishkin was Reiser4 for Linux 5.7.1. Though given the minimal changes with 5.7.1 compared to last week's 5.7 release, the patch presumably should apply cleanly there as well. There are no reports of any other functional Reiser4 changes besides re-basing to the new kernel series.

Read more

Reiser5 Updates For Linux 5.5 Along With Reiser4

Filed under
Reiser

The out-of-tree Reiser4 and Reiser5 (Reiser4 v5) patches have been updated against the recently stabilized Linux 5.5 kernel.

Main Reiser4 developer Edward Shishkin re-based the Reiser4 file-system patch against Linux 5.5.1 along with the experimental Reiser5.

At the end of 2019 is when Shishkin announced Reiser5 file-system development with introducing the concepts of local volumes capable of parallel scaling out and other key iterations over the current Reiser4 design.

Read more

Reiser4 File-System Is Still Ticking In 2019 - Now Updated For Linux 5.3 Compatibility

Filed under
Linux
Reiser

Edward Shishkin continues near single-handedly maintaining the out-of-tree Reiser4 code that at this point still has no apparent trajectory towards mainline. The former Namesys developer previously indicated it's unlikely to see Reiser4 merged unless there is a company backing it to get it through the review process for merging into mainline. While Reiser4 was quite promising for its early time, it's only getting more difficult with Reiser4 effectively stagnating for years now while SUSE/openSUSE continues backing Btrfs, Ubuntu increasingly investing in ZFS support, Red Hat developing Stratis, XFS continuing to be advanced by Red Hat and others as well, Google continuing to invest in the likes of EXT4/F2FS, and there also being Bcachefs and other open-source storage solutions that are more promising than Reiser4 in 2019. Nevertheless, the out-of-tree kernel patches continue to be updated.

Read more

Reiser4 Brought To The Linux 5.0 Kernel

Filed under
Reiser

For those still using the out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system, it may be about time to consider alternatives like Btrfs, XFS, ZFS On Linux, F2FS, or even the likes of Stratis and Bcachefs. But should you still be using this once promising file-system, the out-of-tree patches have been revised to now work with the Linux 5.0 kernel.

There still is no trajectory for Reiser4 to the mainline Linux kernel with no major companies or other stakeholders backing Reiser4 but just a small group of developers and enthusiasts left working on this successor to ReiserFS. With the latest code posted on Friday by former Namesys developer Edward Shishkin, the Reiser4 kernel driver has been re-based to the Linux 5.0 kernel but with no other changes to the file-system noted.

Read more

Reiser4 File-System Benchmarks With Linux 4.17

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Reiser

It's been about three years since last carrying out any file-system performance benchmarks of Reiser4, but being curious how it stacks up against the current state of today's mainline Linux file-systems, here are some fresh performance tests of Reiser4 using the Linux 4.17 kernel. The Reiser4 performance was compared to Reiserfs, EXT4, Btrfs, XFS, and F2FS.

Read more

Reiser4 Updated For Linux 4.14 & Introduces Zstd Compression Support

Filed under
Reiser

The out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system driver has been updated with compatibility for the latest Linux 4.14 stable series. Besides reworking the code to run on Linux 4.14, this controversial file-system has also added support for Zstd file-system compression.

Linux 4.14 introduced Zstd support in the mainline kernel and wired it in for SquashFS and Btrfs. Our Btrfs Zstd benchmarks have been promising for transparent file-system compression compared to the other supported algorithms. Reiser4 has now picked up Zstd compression as an eventual replacement to their Gzip compression support.

Read more

Reiser4 Is Now Ready For Linux 4.13

Filed under
Reiser

For those wanting to use the Reiser4 file-system with the just-released Linux 4.13 kernel, patches are already available.

Less than one week after the release of the Linux 4.13 stable kernel, Edward Shishkin has already released an updated patch for the out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system for working with this new stable series.

Read more

Reiser4 Updated For Linux 4.12, Experimental Data Striping Support

Filed under
Reiser

Those using the Reiser4 file-system in some capacity can now safely upgrade to the Linux 4.12 kernel.

Edward Shishkin has updated this out-of-tree file-system for the Linux 4.12 kernel so it can be built with the latest mainline stable release.

Read more

Reiser4 Updated For The Linux 4.10 Kernel

Filed under
Reiser

The out-of-tree Reiser4 file-system has been updated for the Linux 4.10 kernel.

Reiser4 for the Linux 4.10.0 kernel is available as of earlier this week, managing to release their updated file-system driver code quite promptly. This port to Linux 4.10 yielded a few changes to the Reiser4 code as they re-based to this Linux kernel with the ->readlink() of inode operations being removed as well as the WRITE_FLUSH_FUA flag being removed.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Puppy Linux 9.5 is here based on Focal Fossa

The Puppy Linux team announced the latest Puppy release - Puppy Linux 9.5 based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - Focal Fossa. Read more

Ade Malsasa Akbar on CloudTube and Mailo

  • Let's Welcome CloudTube

    Do you remember Invidious Everywhere? Since early September Invidio.us is unfortunately officially closed and the Invidious web software development is now seeking for new maintainer. Thank you Omarroth for this incredibly good YouTube front end for your hard works help people and me truly a lot for these years. However, there is a good news, it is CloudTube now an alternative to Invidious so we can watch YouTube right in the web browser without being tracked nor running nonfree javascript.

  • Mailo Email Service for Internet Users

    Here is Mailo a new email service you can register to based in France, Europe. With Mailo your email address will be like malsasa@mailo.com. It promises ethical emails, offers free accounts, and gives imap feature with beautiful yet easy to use interface. What's so special about Mailo is it's friendly to everyone using Free Libre Open Source Software in general and everyone seeking privacy alternative to Gmail in particular. It is featured in Free Software Foundation's Webmail Systems page. For you who are looking for secure email other than Disroot or Tutanota, Mailo is very promising. By this article I wish our readers try and give us comments about it.

Best Linux distros of 2020 for beginners, mainstream and advanced users

Different Linux distros can all work with Linux software and applications, and of course, any cloud-based apps that run through a browser. However, Linux distros come with a variety of different ranges of bundled software. Some might come with a lot of basic applications already pre-installed, while others will have the barest minimum. And, as mentioned, Linux is very customizable, far beyond what normal Windows or Mac users may be used to. Users can commonly configure everything from their desktop to security and privacy settings. Altogether, this is why it helps to have a good idea of what different Linux distros can offer. Do you need a GUI more familiar to Windows? Are you more concerned about privacy? How comfortable are you with typing commands rather than clicking icons? Read more

today's howtos