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Reiser

Reiser presents hard drives in court

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Reiser

abclocal.go.com: Two hard drives that computer engineer Hans Reiser removed from one of his computers shortly after his estranged wife Nina disappeared on Sept. 3, 2006, were produced in court today by his attorney, William DuBois.

Hans Reiser Explaining 'Construction Project' and Nina's Blood

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blog.wired.com: Hans Reiser took the witness stand for the eighth day at his murder trial here Monday and offered innocent explanations over why his wife's blood was discovered at his house, the last place where she was seen alive.

Reiser Admits Trying to Hide Car From Police

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: Linux guru Hans Reiser conceded in open court here Thursday he was trying to hide his car from the police in the aftermath of his estranged wife's disappearance.

Reiser Fumbling: 'I Am Not Consistent In My Thinking'

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: The Hans Reiser murder trial resumed here Wednesday with the defendant fumbling on the witness stand. "Are you just making these things up?" Alameda County prosecutor Paul Hora asked at one point.

Hans Reiser Stumbles on Witness Stand; Defense Attorney Cuts Bait

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blog.wired.com: Linux guru Hans Reiser took the witness stand for the fifth day at his murder trial here Tuesday and immediately decried the police as law breakers who will do anything to get a conviction, including the planting of evidence.

Reiser Says Wife Vanished After He Accused Her of Embezzlement

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blog.wired.com: Linux guru Hans Reiser, on the witness stand here for the fourth day Monday, denied again that he killed his missing wife. The defendant claimed his 31-year-old wife, whom he married in 1999, abandoned her children because she embezzled hundreds of thousands of dollars from his Oakland-based Namesys company.

And: Hans Reiser Explaining Coincidences; Jury Seems Unmoved

Reiser Fumbling Over Why Police Told Nina to Get Gun

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: Murder defendant Hans Reiser fumbled for the first time on the witness stand Thursday, his third day of testifying before jurors who are weighing whether the popular Linux programmer killed his wife in 2006.

Also: Judge Gags Lawyers in Hans Reiser Murder Trial

Hans Reiser Testifying He Still Cares for Nina, Missing Seat Explained

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Reiser

wired blogs: Hans Reiser took the stand Wednesday for the second day at his murder trial here, telling jurors that he still has feelings for his estranged wife he is accused of killing.

Hans Reiser Denies Murdering His Wife

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: Hans Reiser was just sworn in. His attorney, William DuBois, is lobbing questions to him. The defendant says he met his wife in a café in 1998 in Russia.

Defense Planting Seeds of Doubt; Is the Reiser Son to be Believed?

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blog.wired.com: The Hans Reiser defense on Thursday zeroed in on the case's only eyewitness -- the Linux programmer's 8-year-old son: A child psychologist took the stand in a bid to convince jurors that the boy, when he was 6, saw his mother Nina Reiser walk out of the Oakland hills house where prosecutors said she never left alive.

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