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Reiser

Reiser4 File-System SSD "Discard" Support Gets Revised

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Linux
Reiser

Ivan Shapovalov is back on track with his Reiser4 file-system contributions.

Shapovalov has been working on Reiser4 support for TRIM/Discard on SSDs. It's been some weeks since the last revision but the fourth version of the patches are now out there for this common file-system feature of being able to discard blocks by informing the solid-state drive about blocks that are no longer in use by the file-system. Most mainline Linux file-systems already support SSD discard, which is generally exposed via the discard mount option -- which is also the case for Reiser4.

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Reiser4 Updated With Transaction Models, Linux 3.14

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Linux
Reiser

Reiser4 now has support for different transaction models. Reiser4 can now change between transaction models with regard to a journalling mode, a write-anywhere / copy-on-write model, and a hybrid transaction model.

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Reiser4: Different Transaction Models

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Reiser

Reiser4 users now can choose a transaction model which is most suitable for their devices. This is very simple: just specify it by respective mount option. With the patch applied you will have 3 options.

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IPFire drops Reiser4 filesystem support

Filed under
Linux
Reiser
Software

h-online.com: IPFire, the hardened Linux distribution for firewall appliances, was recently updated to IPFire 2.11 Core update 61 and along with the enhancements, the developers announced that they are ending support for the Reiser4 filesystem

Jury awards Hans Reiser's children $60 million in damages

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Reiser

mercurynews.com: A jury in the civil wrongful death trial of convicted wife killer Hans Reiser has awarded his children $60 million in damages for the loss of their mother.

Linux Guru sued by kids for mother's death

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Reiser

wired.com: Four years after being convicted of killing his wife, Linux guru Hans Reiser returns Monday to court, this time to defend himself from a wrongful-death suit brought by his two children.

Linux Guru Hans Reiser Demands New Murder Trial

Filed under
Linux
Reiser

wired.com: Linux programmer Hans Reiser, who in 2008 was found guilty of murdering his estranged wife in Oakland, California, is going to federal court to demand a new trial, claiming his attorney forced him to take the stand against his will.

The 10 biggest tech scandals of the decade

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Reiser
Sci/Tech
Misc

techrepublic.com: Choosing the worst tech disgraces of the past 10 years isn’t easy, but CNET News recently took a crack at it. The incidents that made the cut involve sexual harassment, stripper-crazed CEOs, spies, congressional investigations, and even murder.

James Franco to make movie of Nina Reiser murder

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Reiser
Movies

cinemablend.com: James Franco has purchased the rights to the memoir The Adderall Diaries: A Memoir of Moods, Masochism, and Murder by Stephen Elliott with the intention of adapting, directing, producing and starring, according to Variety.

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Programming Leftovers

  • ThreatMapper: Open source platform for scanning runtime environments - Help Net Security

    Deepfence announced open source availability of ThreatMapper, a signature offering that automatically scans, maps and ranks application vulnerabilities across serverless, Kubernetes, container and multi-cloud environments.

  • Josef Strzibny: Organizing business logic in Rails with contexts

    Rails programmers have almost always tried to figure out the golden approach to business logic in their applications. From getting better at object-oriented design, to service objects, all the way to entirely new ideas like Trailblazer or leaving Active Record altogether. Here’s one more design approach that’s clean yet railsy.

  • Status update, October 2021

    On this dreary morning here in Amsterdam, I’ve made my cup of coffee and snuggled my cat, and so I’m pleased to share some FOSS news with you. Some cool news today! We’re preparing for a new core product launch at sr.ht, cool updates for our secret programming language, plus news for visurf. Simon Ser has been hard at work on expanding his soju and gamja projects for the purpose of creating a new core sourcehut product: chat.sr.ht. We’re rolling this out in a private beta at first, to seek a fuller understanding of the system’s performance characteristics, to make sure everything is well-tested and reliable, and to make plans for scaling, maintenance, and general availability. In short, chat.sr.ht is a hosted IRC bouncer which is being made available to all paid sr.ht users, and a kind of webchat gateway which will be offered to unpaid and anonymous users. I’m pretty excited about it, and looking forward to posting a more detailed announcement in a couple of weeks. In other sourcehut news, work on GraphQL continues, with paste.sr.ht landing and todo.sr.ht’s writable API in progress. Our programming langauge project grew some interesting features this month as well, the most notable of which is probably reflection. I wrote an earlier blog post which goes over this in some detail. There’s also ongoing work to develop the standard library’s time and date support, riscv64 support is essentially done, and we’ve overhauled the grammar for switch and match statements to reduce a level of indentation for typical code. In the coming weeks, I hope to see date/time support and reflection fleshed out much more, and to see some more development on the self-hosted compiler. [...] The goal of this project is to provide a conservative CSS toolkit which allows you to build web interfaces which are compatible with marginalized browsers like Netsurf and Lynx.

  • Monthly Report - September

    The month of September is very special to me personaly. Why? Well, I got married in the very same month 18 years ago. The best part is, I choose the day 11 to get married. I have never missed my wedding anniversary, thanks to all the TV news channel.

  • My Favorite Warnings: uninitialized | Tom Wyant [blogs.perl.org]

    This warning was touched on in A Belated Introduction, but I thought it deserved its own entry. When a Perl scalar comes into being, be it an actual scalar variable or an array or hash entry, its value is undef. Now, the results of operating on an undef value are perfectly well-defined: in a nuneric context it is 0, in a string context it is '', and in a Boolean context it is false. The thing is, if you actually operate on such a value, did you mean to do it, or did you forget to initialize something, or initialize the wrong thing, or operate on the wrong thing? Because of the latter possibilities Perl will warn about such operations if the uninitialized warning is enabled.

today's leftovers

  • CutefishOS Built on Ubuntu Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at CutefishOS Built on Ubuntu.

  • CutefishOS Built on Ubuntu

    Today we are looking at CutefishOS Built on Ubuntu. It comes with Linux Kernel 5.11, based on Ubuntu 21.10, and uses about 900MB of ram when idling. Enjoy!

  • Google adds VM support to Anthos, admits not everyone is ready for containerised everything [Ed: Kubernetes becoming increasingly just an openwashing shim for proprietary software with back doors]

    Google has added support for workloads running in virtual machines to its Anthos hybrid Kubernetes platform. "While we have seen many customers make the leap to containerization, some are not quite ready to move completely off of virtual machines," wrote Google Application Modernization Platform vice-presidents Jeff Reed and Chen Goldberg. "They want a unified development platform where developers can build, modify, and deploy applications residing in both containers and VMs in a common, shared environment," the pair added.

  • The Dell Inspiron 15 3501 supports Linux

    With the Inspiron 15 3501, Dell has a 15.6-inch office laptop in its lineup with its technology housed in a slim, matte-black plastic case. The chassis lacks stability: The lid and the base unit in particular can be twisted a bit too much. The matte display (Full HD, IPS) offers stable viewing angles, good contrast, and decent color reproduction. However, the brightness and color-space coverage are too low. The built-in combination of the Core i7-1165G7 processor, 16 GB of RAM (dual-channel mode), and a 512 GB NVMe SSD (M.2 2230) equips the laptop for office and Internet applications. If the storage space isn't enough, an additional 2.5-inch storage drive can be installed. You can also replace or expand the RAM.

  • Linux Foundation raises USD 10 mln to secure software supply chain
  • ISO establishes SBOM standard for open source development with SPDX

    You’re not getting attention because of your choice of text editor or the number of spaces you use to indent code blocks. However motivating those preferences are for you and me, the non-technical world sees them as private choices. You find your code in the headlines for a different and unpleasant reason: open source dependency management.

  • Printed Piano Mechanism Sure Is Grand | Hackaday

    Do you know how a piano works? Sure, you press a key and a hammer strikes a string, but what are the finer points of this operation? The intricacy of the ingenious mechanism is laid bare in [Mechanistic]’s 3D-printed scale model of a small section of the grand piano keyboard. The ‘grand’ distinction here is piano length-agnostic and simply refers to any non-upright. Those operate the same way, but are laid out differently in order to save space.

  • FPGA Boards Add VGA And HMDI Interfaces To The Original Game Boy | Hackaday

    The classic Game Boy remains a firm favorite in the realm of retrocomputing. Revolutionary as it was at the time, by today’s standards its display is rather primitive, with no backlight and a usable area measuring only 47 mm x 44 mm. [Martoni] figured out a way to solve this, by developing GbVGA and GbHdmi, two projects that enable the Game Boy to connect to an external monitor. This way, you can play Super Mario Land without straining your eyes, and we can also image potential uses for those who stream their gameplay online.

  • Art Project Fast And Fouriously Transforms Audio Into Eye Candy | Hackaday

    The overall build is relatively simple. Audio is acquired via a line-in jack or a microphone, and then piped into an ESP32. The ESP32 runs the audio through the FFT routine, sampling, slicing, and dicing the audio into 16 individual bands. The visual output is displayed on a 16 x 16 WS2812 Led Matrix. [mircemk] wrote several routines for displaying the incoming audio, with a waterfall, a graph, and other visualizations that are quit aesthetically pleasing. Some of them are downright mesmerizing! You can see the results in the video below the break.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Reach your open source community with content marketing [Ed: IBM has totally lost direction; this is how they think of Free software...]

    Both startups and more established firms are increasingly turning to content marketing as a way of reaching prospective customers. However, corporate marketers often consider the open source software (OSS) community a challenge to reach. This article features ways your technology and content marketing teams can work together to target and reach the community around an OSS project your organization supports.

  • Why digital transformation demands a change in leadership mindset

    Recently a key retail executive forecast that their industry will change more in the next five years than it has in the past fifty. Another executive believes society will change more in the next fifty years than it has in the last three hundred. A recent headline declared that, “We are approaching the fastest, deepest, most consequential technological disruption in history”, and Ray Kurzweil, Google’s Director of Engineering and co-Founder of Singularity University, has said that there will be fourteen internet size revolutions in the next decade. Whichever way you look at it, things are shifting… fast. When you speak with the visionaries and entrepreneurs actually building the solutions of tomorrow, from on-demand retail to vertical farms, and ask how far into this new era we are, almost universally the reply is: “only one percent”. Imagine then, where we will be ten years from now? How about 50? Major industries, from medicine to energy to travel to entertainment, are radically transforming, putting pressure on others such as manufacturing, construction, transportation, finance, education…frankly, all of it. What an extraordinary opportunity this presents.

  • DevSecOps lessons learned during a pandemic | The Enterprisers Project

    As we’ve seen over the past year and a half, the pandemic has accelerated digital transformation and forever changed workplace culture. Increased reliance on digital tools has elevated the value of DevSecOps, as enterprises of all sizes and across all industries realize the importance of automating and integrating security at every phase of the software development lifecycle – from initial design through integration, testing, deployment, and product delivery. My engineering team was no exception to this shift – we had to quickly prepare to build a new Virtana SaaS platform and deliver several new modules, all while working remotely. Here I’ll share some observations, pain points, and lessons learned to help others intelligently embrace DevSecOps best practices within their teams.