Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

A phone, a Dock, a thin Client.. Thanks Ubuntu..

Filed under
Linux

A while ago I suggested that Ubuntu were all out of Ideas, turns out they are not, they are full of them. Well after Ubuntu TV, here is a new Idea. Android Phone, a Dock, Ubuntu Desktop, Seamless integration.

Read More

Moving to Linux on a Macbook PRo

Filed under
Linux

the announcement of Mountain Lion is the Vista moment for Apple, it's that point when many Apple users will take time to step back and think about the Operating system on their Apple PC.

Windows 8 will be one option However Linux has become a very stable OS when done right on Apple hardware. However it takes a big step and a leap of faith to drop OSX..

Take the First Step

What the difference a distro release makes..

Filed under
Linux

I'm a firm believer in Sabayon, i've been using it since the heady days of version 3 with the DVD ISO which contained nearly 4GB of both Gnome and KDE distros and an hours installation. This gave the user a bleeding edge distro which implemented Compiz first and better than anyone else as an example.however I have to say I'm just a little disappointed in this release with it's implementation of Gnome 3.

Read more...

What options for a computer Desktop in 2012

Filed under
Linux

What's out there right now when it comes to Desktop Interfaces which are available right now and how do they relate to the Touch interface Tablets moving forward?

Read more...

Corel Aftershot Pro makes Ubuntu a Viable OS for Photographers

Filed under
Linux

Corel have recently announced Aftershock Pro a $100 package aimed directly at Adobe Lightroom and Apple Aperture as a photo workflow and management tool. and there is a Linux Option..

Read more...

Secure Portable Ubuntu... Saving space in my Luggage

Filed under
Linux

Yes, thats right.. An Encrypted, USB, Portable device in 10 minutes, which works.. Can be locked down, boots into Gnome2 if Unity fails, boots on an HP, Compaq, Dell and Apple because i've tested these, prints, webcams work, usb headsets work, Citrix client works, PPTP, OpenVPN, IPSec and runs ANY software from the Ubuntu repository..

Read more...

What does 2012 have in store for the Linux OS?

Filed under
Linux

2011 was a very interesting year for Linux, the Jewel in the crown Ubuntu got some very bad press mostly over Unity. KDE started to get its act together and took great strides to provide a usable GUI and the Gnome Team took minimalisation to a whole new level for GUI's with Gnome 3.

So what does 2012 have to offer for the Linux Community?

Read more...

Pear OS Linux Panther 3 review

Filed under
Linux

Pear OS is a new Linux desktop distribution based on Ubuntu Desktop with the graphical installer. Its development started in early August 2011 by David Tavares (from France), and on August 15 2011, Pear OS 1.0, the first version marked “stable,” was released. The latest edition, release on December 14 2011, is Pear OS Linux Panther 3.

Thanks for the memories Firefox and goodbye..

Filed under
Linux

I have very fond memories of the first time i found Firefox or Phoenix as it was known almost 10 years ago in 2002. It was a breath of fresh air compared to the then seemingly bloated and slow Internet Explorer browser. Netscape was still around at these times and as Phoenix became Firebird, and Firebird became Firefox early features such as Tabbed Browsing, Plugins and Extentions set Firefox far ahead of the competition.

Read more...

Linux Mint 12 review

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint 12 is the latest edition of the popular Linux distribution. Not to be confused with Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE), the version of Linux Mint that is based on Debian, Linux Mint 12 is based on Ubuntu Desktop. This release, code-named Lisa, comes with more desktop options than you would normally find on a Ubuntu-based distribution.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

CORD becomes a Linux Foundation project

Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD), an open source integrated solutions platform for service providers leveraging merchant silicon, white boxes, and open source platforms such as Open Network Operating System (ONOS), OpenStack, Docker, and the cloud operating system XOS, is now part of the Linux Foundation as a new independent project. The Linux foundation is already home to many open source networking projects, including OpenDaylight and ONOS, so CORD is a natural fit for the non-profit foundation. Read more

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

Proprietary and Microsoft Software