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Using dual factor authentication on Linux..

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Linux

I’m really starting to appreciate the benifits of dual factor authentication across the board, so this Howtoforge article is of interest to anyone who wants to secure SSH access on thier Linux systems. I previously posted about using your mobile phone as the something you have bit, well this is another method.

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HOW TO DO MASS ENROLLING OF YUBIKEY WITH LINOTP

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Linux

While you may have your Ubuntu install locked down with Full disk encryption incase you loose the laptop, UFW locking down the network with a firewall, there is no point if you have a poor password. Dual factor authentication using One Time Passwords may be an option for you, if they are this great howtoforge article might point you in the right direction.

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Half-Life

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Linux

I've been playing Half-Life recently, something to which I've looked forward for quite some time. I did get it playing under Wine years ago, but I thought I only got a little ways. I'm stuck In the Rails right now, but I remember this level.

Getting Squid3 on Debian 6.x to work with Active Directory, Security Groups and Websense

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Linux

I’ve had a need to get a local squid proxy to perform local filtering based on AD Security groups because it’s not something websense can do. I found this wonderful howtofoge guide online and Used it to setup the base system. This howto is a work in progress as the next stage is to get it working with DansGuardian or SquidGuard.

Prerequisites
Client Internet Explorer Browsers need to have “Enable Integrated Windows Authentication” ticked in Internet Options :: Advanced settings as well as Proxy Auto detection enabled – google these if not sure. All modern web browsers will support proxy auto detection. Firefox and Chrome also support Windows Authentication.

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Enabling Dual Factor Authentication on Linux SSH logins..

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Linux

A couple of weeks ago I wrote a post on using a Chromebook to develop on a cloud platform. Its based on a Digital Ocean remote server and like most people who wish to attach to the command line interface on a remote server I use SSH. It’s an encrypted connection over the network/internet from end to end. However being a cloud server I was wondering if it was possible to secure this a little bit more?

A chat with a friend on the way into work provided me with a solution.

The solution is Two Factor authentication a system beased on a simple premise, something you know (the SSH password in this case) and something you have (your mobile phone in this case, but it could be a secure token) which will deliver a random number.

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Ubuntu 13.04 raring to go on Acer C7 Chromebook

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Linux

Most of the guides you will see using this utility mine included cover how to get Ubuntu 12.04 the LTS version working, however there is also scope within the command line to get the latest and greatest up and running. specifically the -r switch. Issuing the following command will provide you with a bare bones Ubuntu 13.04 install

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Using a Chromebook to develop in the cloud…

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Linux

Being a few months in with my Acer C7 Chromebook as my only laptop i’ve very pleased with what it does, I do have the Crouton Ubuntu chroot installed and upgraded the device to 16Gb of Ram, however there is one core thing I miss with this setup. VMWare/Virtualbox. I find i’m often building virtual machines, usually Ubuntu to test bsh scripts or build LAMP Environments to test some PHP out with. That isn’t something i’m able to do even on the CHROOT Ubuntu environment.

All however is not lost, and i’ve found a way to get round this..

Read my ChromeOS virtual soluton

Desktop era

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Linux

Will the believers in the desktops ever stop making this year is the year of Linux on the desktop...

There’s something Ubuntu needs to do if the phone is going to work..

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Linux

They say a week in politics is a long time, well a year in the mobile phone industry is an eternity and what huge changes the industry is going through. A year ago the roost was ruled by Apple and Google, 3G was the fastest we can go and handsets were finding a stock size at 4.5″.. The world however of the mobile device is now a very different place and very much in a positive state of change..

What does the Ubuntu Phone need to succeed?

Casual Programming and Linux Screen-Recorders

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Linux

After being retired (for four years) from teaching high school Computer Science, I decided to get back into programming again. I once taught a beginning programming class using the Ruby language, and I thought that would be a good way to get back into programming. So, I decided I needed a “Ruby refresher”, and I wanted to learn more about that language than I taught in the classroom.

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More in Tux Machines

How Linux became my job

I've been using open source since what seems like prehistoric times. Back then, there was nothing called social media. There was no Firefox, no Google Chrome (not even a Google), no Amazon, barely an internet. In fact, the hot topic of the day was the new Linux 2.0 kernel. The big technical challenges in those days? Well, the ELF format was replacing the old a.out format in binary Linux distributions, and the upgrade could be tricky on some installs of Linux. Read more

Linux 4.16-rc2

It's been a quiet week, and rc2 is out. I take the fairly quiet rc be a good sign for 4.16, but honestly, rc2 is often fairly calm. That's probably because people are taking a breather after the merge window, but also simply because it might take a while to find any issues. But let's be optimistic, and just assume - at least for now - that it's because all is well. The diffstat is fairly odd, but that often happens with small rc's just because then just a couple of pulls will skew things easily in one or two directions. This time the patch is about one third architecture updates (arm64, x86, powerpc), one third tooling (mostly 'perf') and one third "rest". And yes, the bulk of that rest is drivers (gpu, nvme, sound, misc), but those drivers are still distinctly *not* the bulk of the whole patch. Go out and test, it all looks fine. Read more Also: Linux 4.16-rc2 Kernel Released

OpenStreetMap in IkiWiki and Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble

  • OSM in IkiWiki
    Since about 15 years ago, I have been thinking of creating a geo-referenced wiki of pubs, with loads of structured data to help searching. I don't know if that would be useful for anybody else, but I know I would use it! Sadly, the many times I started coding something towards that goal, I ended blocked by something, and I keep postponing my dream project.
  • Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble
    That said, while I still believe in the goals of OpenStreetMap, I feel the OpenStreetMap project is currently unable to fulfill that mission due to poor technical decisions, poor political decisions, and a general malaise in the project. I'm going to outline in this article what I think OpenStreetMap has gotten wrong. It's entirely possible that OSM will reform and address the impediments to its success- and I hope it does. We need a Free as in Freedom geographic dataset.

Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11

Thanks to work done by Hans Petter Selasky and others, this drm-next-kmod port is working on FreeBSD 11 stable. What's different with this package from the ports collection versus the ported-from-Linux Direct Rendering Modules found within the FreeBSD 11 kernel is that these DRM modules are using the linuxkpi interface. Read more