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HOW TO DO MASS ENROLLING OF YUBIKEY WITH LINOTP

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Linux

While you may have your Ubuntu install locked down with Full disk encryption incase you loose the laptop, UFW locking down the network with a firewall, there is no point if you have a poor password. Dual factor authentication using One Time Passwords may be an option for you, if they are this great howtoforge article might point you in the right direction.

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Half-Life

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Linux

I've been playing Half-Life recently, something to which I've looked forward for quite some time. I did get it playing under Wine years ago, but I thought I only got a little ways. I'm stuck In the Rails right now, but I remember this level.

Getting Squid3 on Debian 6.x to work with Active Directory, Security Groups and Websense

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Linux

I’ve had a need to get a local squid proxy to perform local filtering based on AD Security groups because it’s not something websense can do. I found this wonderful howtofoge guide online and Used it to setup the base system. This howto is a work in progress as the next stage is to get it working with DansGuardian or SquidGuard.

Prerequisites
Client Internet Explorer Browsers need to have “Enable Integrated Windows Authentication” ticked in Internet Options :: Advanced settings as well as Proxy Auto detection enabled – google these if not sure. All modern web browsers will support proxy auto detection. Firefox and Chrome also support Windows Authentication.

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Enabling Dual Factor Authentication on Linux SSH logins..

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Linux

A couple of weeks ago I wrote a post on using a Chromebook to develop on a cloud platform. Its based on a Digital Ocean remote server and like most people who wish to attach to the command line interface on a remote server I use SSH. It’s an encrypted connection over the network/internet from end to end. However being a cloud server I was wondering if it was possible to secure this a little bit more?

A chat with a friend on the way into work provided me with a solution.

The solution is Two Factor authentication a system beased on a simple premise, something you know (the SSH password in this case) and something you have (your mobile phone in this case, but it could be a secure token) which will deliver a random number.

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Ubuntu 13.04 raring to go on Acer C7 Chromebook

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Linux

Most of the guides you will see using this utility mine included cover how to get Ubuntu 12.04 the LTS version working, however there is also scope within the command line to get the latest and greatest up and running. specifically the -r switch. Issuing the following command will provide you with a bare bones Ubuntu 13.04 install

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Using a Chromebook to develop in the cloud…

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Linux

Being a few months in with my Acer C7 Chromebook as my only laptop i’ve very pleased with what it does, I do have the Crouton Ubuntu chroot installed and upgraded the device to 16Gb of Ram, however there is one core thing I miss with this setup. VMWare/Virtualbox. I find i’m often building virtual machines, usually Ubuntu to test bsh scripts or build LAMP Environments to test some PHP out with. That isn’t something i’m able to do even on the CHROOT Ubuntu environment.

All however is not lost, and i’ve found a way to get round this..

Read my ChromeOS virtual soluton

Desktop era

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Linux

Will the believers in the desktops ever stop making this year is the year of Linux on the desktop...

There’s something Ubuntu needs to do if the phone is going to work..

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Linux

They say a week in politics is a long time, well a year in the mobile phone industry is an eternity and what huge changes the industry is going through. A year ago the roost was ruled by Apple and Google, 3G was the fastest we can go and handsets were finding a stock size at 4.5″.. The world however of the mobile device is now a very different place and very much in a positive state of change..

What does the Ubuntu Phone need to succeed?

Casual Programming and Linux Screen-Recorders

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Linux

After being retired (for four years) from teaching high school Computer Science, I decided to get back into programming again. I once taught a beginning programming class using the Ruby language, and I thought that would be a good way to get back into programming. So, I decided I needed a “Ruby refresher”, and I wanted to learn more about that language than I taught in the classroom.

Maybe it's time to think about LTSP?

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Linux

With austerity being the watchword of our times being able to get as much out of that IT hardware you have is as important as ever, more so when the industry is in shift at an OS level and maybe the hardware you have isn’t quite up to the task of Windows 8?

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More in Tux Machines

University of Missouri Adopts Open Access

Ubuntu Development Updates: GDM, Kernel, and Ubuntu Phone

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Proceeding With Transition From LightDM To GDM
    As part of the switch over to the GNOME Shell desktop environment by default for Ubuntu 17.10, they are also abandoning the LightDM display/log-in manager in favor of GNOME's GDM.
  • [Ubuntu] Kernel Team Summary: June 22, 2017
    We intend to target a 4.13 kernel for the Ubuntu 17.10 release. The Ubuntu 17.10 Kernel Freeze is Thurs Oct 5, 2017.
  • Ubuntu Phone project failed because it was a mess: claim
    A developer who worked with the Ubuntu Phone project has outlined the reasons for its failure, painting a picture of confusion, poor communication and lack of technical and marketing foresight. Simon Raffeiner stopped working with the project in mid-2016, about 10 months before Canonical owner Mark Shuttleworth announced that development of the phone and the tablet were being stopped.

Tumbleweed Development and Laptop Experience

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Qt 5.9, Linux Kernel 4.11.6, and MP3 Out-Of-The-Box
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system are getting a lot of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software applications lately as a total of seven snapshots were released this week. openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio is back to report that openSUSE Tumbleweed is now powered by the latest Linux 4.11.6 kernel, and the GStreamer multimedia framework was updated to the major 1.12 series, adding out-of-the-box MP3 decoding support in the distribution.
  • Tumbleweed Gets Qt 5.9, mp3 Out-Of-The Box
    A total of seven openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots featuring new software were released this week along with an upgrade to GStreamer that allows for mp3 decoding to work out-of-the box. The newest stable Linux Kernel 4.11.6 is also available in the latest Tumbleweed snapshot 20170620. Updates in the repositories from the 20170620 snapshot brought both the 52.2 versions of Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird, which fixed some critical vulnerabilities. Systemd 233 provided a package for a new systemd-umount binary and, with the update of dracut 044.1, supports the new compatibility rule. Fontconfig’s 2.12.3 version fixed the build issues with gperf 3.1 and on GNU Hurd. The Beta 2 version of LibreOffice 5.4 cleaned up the license string and got rid of the Oxygen theme. A removal of support for old, non-systemd distros was made available in the snapshot with libvirt 3.4.0.
  • Dell Latitude D630 Tumbleweed Refresh
    I am not quick to buy new things, though I did replace my Dell Latitude D630 about three months ago with a newer Dell latitude E6440. My plan was to deprecate the machine and put it on a "reserve only" status. In my process of setting up the E6440, I found that I used my D630 still but quite differently, it became my home station machine and my E6440 would be my mobile machine that would return back to "base" where I would have it connect as a client to the D630 for keyboard and mouse. It was a rather nice arrangement. Unfortunately, the hard drive died on the D630 and I needed to install openSUSE once again on it in order to continue to use my workspace as I have been. What is $50 on a new hard drive to restore my SuperCubicle, right? [...] I run KDE Plasma for my desktop. I've tried others but the customization options in KDE Plasma just fits my personal tastes best. I have also been real happy with the speed improvements of KDE Plasma in the last couple years and especially those of KDE Plasma 5.10 on Tumbleweed as of late.

GNOME/GSOC Development and Cascade Windows in GNOME Shell

  • Code Search for GNOME Builder : GSOC 2017
    I am very happy to be part of GNOME and Google Summer of Code 2017. First of all, thank you for all GNOME members for giving me this opportunity and Christian Hergert for mentoring and helping me in this project. In this post I will introduce my project and approach for doing this project. Goal of the project is to enhance Go to Definition and Global Search in GNOME Builder for C/C++ projects. Currently in GNOME Builder, using Go to Definition one can go from reference of a symbol to its definition if definition is there in current file or included in current file. In this project, Go to Definition will be enhanced and using that one can go from reference of a symbol to its definition which can be present in any file in the project. Global Search will also be enhanced by allowing to search all symbols in the project fuzzily right from search bar.
  • [Older] GSOC 2017: And so it begins
    But let’s start from the beginning. Only 4 months ago, I was making my first steps as a contributor in the open-source world. One of the first things I discovered is how amazing and helpful the GNOME community is. I started by trying out a lot of GNOME apps and looking through the code behind them and that’s how I discovered Pitivi, a really great video editing solution. After my first patch on Pitivi got accepted, I was really hooked up. Fast forward a couple of patches and now I have the opportunity and great pleasure to work on my own project: UI for the Ken Burns effect, after being accepted for Google Summer of Code 2017. In this amazing journey, I’ve had some great mentoring: special thanks to Thibault Saunier (thiblahute), who is also my current mentor for GSOC 2017, and Alexandru Balut (aleb), who helped me along the way.
  • Pitivi: UI for the Ken-Burns effect
    It’s been three weeks since the coding period for GSOC 2017 started, so it’s time to show the world the progress I made. A short recap: I’ve been working on building a user interface which allows simulating the Ken-Burns effect and other similar effects in Pitivi. The idea is to allow adding keyframes on x, y, width, height properties of a clip, much like we are doing with other effects.
  • I Finally Found a Way to Cascade Windows in GNOME Shell [Ed: If your workflow involves "Cascade" like in Windows 3.1x, then you make poor use of virtual desktops, activities, etc.]