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Linux

What the difference a distro release makes..

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Linux

I'm a firm believer in Sabayon, i've been using it since the heady days of version 3 with the DVD ISO which contained nearly 4GB of both Gnome and KDE distros and an hours installation. This gave the user a bleeding edge distro which implemented Compiz first and better than anyone else as an example.however I have to say I'm just a little disappointed in this release with it's implementation of Gnome 3.

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What options for a computer Desktop in 2012

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Linux

What's out there right now when it comes to Desktop Interfaces which are available right now and how do they relate to the Touch interface Tablets moving forward?

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Corel Aftershot Pro makes Ubuntu a Viable OS for Photographers

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Linux

Corel have recently announced Aftershock Pro a $100 package aimed directly at Adobe Lightroom and Apple Aperture as a photo workflow and management tool. and there is a Linux Option..

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Secure Portable Ubuntu... Saving space in my Luggage

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Linux

Yes, thats right.. An Encrypted, USB, Portable device in 10 minutes, which works.. Can be locked down, boots into Gnome2 if Unity fails, boots on an HP, Compaq, Dell and Apple because i've tested these, prints, webcams work, usb headsets work, Citrix client works, PPTP, OpenVPN, IPSec and runs ANY software from the Ubuntu repository..

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What does 2012 have in store for the Linux OS?

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Linux

2011 was a very interesting year for Linux, the Jewel in the crown Ubuntu got some very bad press mostly over Unity. KDE started to get its act together and took great strides to provide a usable GUI and the Gnome Team took minimalisation to a whole new level for GUI's with Gnome 3.

So what does 2012 have to offer for the Linux Community?

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Pear OS Linux Panther 3 review

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Linux

Pear OS is a new Linux desktop distribution based on Ubuntu Desktop with the graphical installer. Its development started in early August 2011 by David Tavares (from France), and on August 15 2011, Pear OS 1.0, the first version marked “stable,” was released. The latest edition, release on December 14 2011, is Pear OS Linux Panther 3.

Thanks for the memories Firefox and goodbye..

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Linux

I have very fond memories of the first time i found Firefox or Phoenix as it was known almost 10 years ago in 2002. It was a breath of fresh air compared to the then seemingly bloated and slow Internet Explorer browser. Netscape was still around at these times and as Phoenix became Firebird, and Firebird became Firefox early features such as Tabbed Browsing, Plugins and Extentions set Firefox far ahead of the competition.

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Linux Mint 12 review

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Linux

Linux Mint 12 is the latest edition of the popular Linux distribution. Not to be confused with Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE), the version of Linux Mint that is based on Debian, Linux Mint 12 is based on Ubuntu Desktop. This release, code-named Lisa, comes with more desktop options than you would normally find on a Ubuntu-based distribution.

webOS: The latest open source, Linux distribution

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Linux

The source or cause of the joy is none other than the announcement from HP that webOS will be, in their own words, a “pure open source project.” Awesome! Did I see this coming? Yes, sir! Did I influence HP’s decision? Perhaps.

Tomboy and Dropbox, the Dynamic Duo

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Linux

I just saw an article headline about Tomboy and it's strengths. It made me think about all the reasons I use Tomboy and perhaps my favorite reason for using it.

I use Dropbox because I like having access to files regardless of what computer I'm using or where I'm at. It is extremely helpful to me.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian: RcppSimdJson, Opinionated IkiWiki and More

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSimdJson 0.0.4: Even Faster Upstream!

    A new (upstream) simdjson release was announced by Daniel Lemire earlier this week, and my Twitter mentions have been running red-hot ever since as he was kind enough to tag me. Do look at that blog post, there is some impressive work in there. We wrapped up the (still very simple) rcppsimdjson around it last night and shipped it this morning. RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire. Via some very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. For illustration, I highly recommend the video of the recent talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (which was also voted best talk). The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle use per byte parsed.

  • Jonathan Dowland: Opinionated IkiWiki

    For various personal projects and things, past and present (including my personal site) I use IkiWiki, which (by modern standards) is a bit of a pain to set up and maintain. For that reason I find it hard to recommend to people. It would be nice to fire up a snapshot of an existing IkiWiki instance to test what the outcome of some changes might be. That's cumbersome enough at the moment that I haven't bothered to do it more than once. Separately, some months ago I did a routine upgrade of Debian for the web server running this site, and my IkiWiki installation broke for the first time in ten years. I've never had issues like this before.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in March 2020

    This month I accepted 156 packages and rejected 26. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 203.

Python Programming

  • Python 2.7.8 : Using python scripts with Revit Dynamo.

    Dynamo is a visual programming tool that extends the power of the Revit by providing access to Revit API (Application Programming Interface. Dynamo works with node, each node have inputs and outputs and performs a specific task. This is a short tutorial about how you can use your python skills with Revit and Dynamo software.

  • Getting started with Django middleware

    Django comes with a lot of useful features. One of them is middleware. In this post I'll give a short explanation how middleware works and how to start writing your own.

  • Talk Python to Me: #258 Thriving in a remote developer environment

    If you are listening to this episode when it came out, April 4th, 2020, there's a good chance you are listening at home, or on a walk. But it's probably not while commuting to an office as much of the world is practicing social distancing and working from home. Maybe this is a new experience, brought upon quickly by the global lockdowns, or maybe it's something you've been doing for awhile. Either way, being effective while working remotely, away from the office, is an increasingly valuable skill that most of us in the tech industry have to quickly embrace. On this episode, I'll exchange stories about working from home with Jayson Phillips. He's been writing code and managing a team from his home office for years and has brought a ton of great tips to share with us all.

  • How TO GET STARTED WITH Machine Learning
  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxii) stackoverflow python report

today's howtos

Games: Anodyne, Streets of Rogue, Vendetta Online and More

  • Analgesic Productions have opened up the source for their Zelda-lite 'Anodyne'

    Anodyne, a Zelda-lite action adventure from Analgesic Productions from back in 2013 has today had the code opened up. Looking over the project, it's not open source as they have their own custom licensing with a number of restrictions on it. So by the definition of open source, it is not, it's more like "source open" but it's still a very nice gesture. It's similar in spirit to what Terry Cavanagh did with VVVVVV, in fact the licensing is actually an adaption of theirs. Hopefully with this move, someone can port it over to something more modern rather than Flash/Air—that certainly would be nice to see. Especially if the developer then pulled that back in to update it for everyone.

  • Looks like there's going to be a 'Streets of Rogue 2' and I'm definitely happy with that

    Streets of Rogue released in 2019 and it's one of my absolute favourites from last year (still is this year to be honest with you, it's just that good). The developer, Matt Dabrowski, recently outlined their future plans which will include a sequel. The 2019 release was after over six years of development, and at least half of that it was available in some form to the public. First as a free taster and later a full game. In an announcement on Steam about the latest update, Dabrowski mentioned how they would like to "take Streets of Rogue in some big new directions" and so they've "decided to begin work on a sequel".

  • Vendetta Online goes free to play until June 1 giving anyone full access

    Vendetta Online, something of a classic MMO space game is now free to play for everyone until June 1. Everyone will be treated as if they're a paying player during this time. Why are they doing this for so long? They said they wanted to offer a bit of sanctuary to players, somewhere "they can virtually go and be (politely) social, interact with others, and perhaps get a little respite from the chaos". They are of course referring to the Coronavirus situation. Read more on that here.

  • “Crunch”: Video Game Development’s Dirty Secret

    James Wood reported for Game Revolution that game director Masahiro Sakurai, who created Super Smash Bros Ultimate,  went “to work with an IV drip instead of taking a day off.” As Wood noted, Sakurai’s admission “have raised eyebrows, even in an industry where he is known as “notoriously hard-working.”