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Mandrake Derived Distros

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Linux

Todays special is about Mandrake derived distributions, namely,
OpenMandriva Lx 2014 alpha vs Mageia 4 final vs ROSA 2012 R2 final vs PCLinuxOS 2013.12 final.

In (my limited) testing, I've used the X86_64 versions favoring the KDE desktop, and I've used the NVidia binary drivers provided with each distro.

Here's my experience with each one:

PCLinuxOS 2013--An Old Friend Revisited

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Linux

I first heard about Bill Reynolds (AKA "Texstar") when I was using Mandrake Linux 7 (later called "Mandriva") many years ago. Back then, Texstar was putting together updated KDE releases for Mandrake Linux, as Mandrake would only typically update their KDE release once or twice a year.

SOL

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Linux

Wonder how many journalists are waiting for the SOL to fail so they can use the headline "SOL is Shit Out of Luck?" (Not /me/ of course, but I do smell a poll question in there somewhere).

Del is ambiguous

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Linux

New KDE 4.10.5 is more like Windows than ever. Fresh new warning says "The key sequence 'Del' is ambiguous. Use 'Configure Shortcuts' from the 'Settings' menu to solve the ambiguity. No action will be triggered." Great, after 14 years of using KDE and the Del key to delete unwanted mail, all of a sudden said Del key is ambiguious. What's ambiguious about Del? Del means delete. No means no....

I'm running Mint

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Linux

I needed a fresh install on a safe partition today and thought I'd try Korora 19, but alas, I've ended up using Mint 15 KDE (rc). So, far so good...

ah-ha! That's why Korora

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Linux

When Kororaa changed their name to Korora I wondered why? But today I think I've spotted the real reason.

Time for a discreet OSX feature to come over to Linux.

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Linux

There is functionality in OSX called Airdrop which Linux Desktops could do with as a replacement of the SMB/NFS shared files sharing system. There are some options out with but they are seemingly stale projects which however can provide the functionality which is needed in Linux

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The question is, Which OS is the best? The replies were interesting.

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Linux

asking this very simple question which is the best Operating system in some corners of the Internet, is like throwing a slab of raw meat into a wild animal enclosure and watching as the question gets ripped apart. Its tantamount to asking which religion or political system is the best in the way some will tear strips off others

The rest here...

Is OpenSuse a viable Ubuntu alternative?

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Linux

There’s lots of forums and even 3 or 4 releases in I still hear people talking about how much they dislike Unity, which is a shame because it’s turning into quite a nice Gui from where i’m sitting, however one thing Linux has is choice. If nothing else there are other solid, stable distributions out there which offer a user a good solid alternative. Once such example is maybe OpenSUSE.

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Nettop, the command not the hardware is not just for OSX..

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Linux

I found this article on the osxdaily website, the article refers to running nettop on OSX however it’s a *nix command so will also be in the package repository (if not preinstalled) on your favorite distro. I’ve tested all of the command options on Sabayon and they work fine..

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