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kubuntu edgy eft experiences

Filed under
Ubuntu

So finally I decided to do a completely fresh install on my notebook, a Dell C640. If you are looking for a notebook which is good supported by Linux and FreeBSD, I can really recommend it, everything works out-of-the-box. also under FreeBSD, also the external VGA connector, useful when giving talks etc.

Also: Ubuntu Rocks (call it ubuntued)

Upgrading Ubuntu Dapper to Edgy? I Don't Think So!

Filed under
Ubuntu

I have installed Ubuntu Dapper 6.06 and started installing all the programs I need. There are now several add-ons and themes that don't work with Firefox 1.5, so I decided to upgrade Firefox. Months ago I wrote about how stupid it was that Ubuntu 6.06 didn't have any packages for Firefox 2 in the repositories. The official line from Ubuntu is to upgrade from Dapper to Edgy.

Remember Xubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you’ve been around Ubuntu for a year or so, you might recognize that as the default desktop for Breezy Badger Xubuntu version 5.10, released in November of 2005. Now fast-forward to 2007. The Gnomification rolls onward, and the weight of Xubuntu grows with each revolution.

Why Ubuntu Is Number One (Ubuntu Phenomenon)

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Ubuntu

I was always wondering why Ubuntu Linux became so popular within couple of years. There are thousands of other Linux distributions, some of them are more then 10 years old, but Ubuntu became so popular in a short period of time.

How To Use NTFS Drives/Partitions Under Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Normally Linux systems can only read from Windows NTFS partitions, but not write to them which can be very annoying if you have to work with Linux and Windows systems. This is where ntfs-3g comes into play. ntfs-3g is an open source, freely available NTFS driver for Linux with read and write support. This tutorial shows how to install and use ntfs-3g on an Ubuntu Edgy Eft desktop to read from and write to Windows NTFS drives and partitions. It covers the usage of internal NTFS partitions (e.g. in a dual-boot environment) and of external USB NTFS drives.

Will Ubuntu revolutionise the Desktop? Or will it collapse under the weight of its contradictions?

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you have only ever used Windows and you are attempting to install Linux on your own, perhaps because you have never met another Linux user, then the Redhat installer was not the most friendly place to be. Anaconda is beautiful, and fantastic for technical users, but not particularly newbie friendly. So in the beginning, Ubuntu bypassed all this.

How To Create A Local Debian/Ubuntu Mirror With apt-mirror

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to create a Debian/Ubuntu mirror for your local network with the tool apt-mirror. Having a local Debian/Ubuntu mirror is good if you have to install multiple systems in your local network because then all needed packages can be downloaded over the fast LAN connection, thus saving your internet bandwidth.

Video chat working in Ubuntu finally

Filed under
Ubuntu

I finally managed to get my webcam work with AMSN (actually I didn’t do anything much) in my desktop. I have a Logitech Quickcam and Ubuntu Dapper recognized the camera without any problem. The problem was, I had a TV tuner card installed and also the webcam.

Mark Shuttleworth: The Extra Dimension

Filed under
Ubuntu

Apple calls it Quartz. Microsoft calls it something else but it’s most visible in Aero Glass - the transparent theme in Vista. In the free software world we have Xgl and AIGLX (Ubuntu is going down the AIGLX road).

Kubuntu 6.10 Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Kubuntu is a distribution which takes Ubuntu's base packages and adds to it the KDE desktop and a set of KDE applications. Although the two distributions are similar in many ways, their desktop and default set of applications are extremely different.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Snake your way across your Linux terminal

Welcome back to the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. It's hard to say exactly, but my definition is anything that helps you have fun at the terminal. We've been on a roll with games over the weekend, and it was fun, so let's look at one more game today, Snake! Snake is an oldie but goodie; versions of it have been around seemingly forever. The first version I remember playing was one called Nibbles that came packaged with QBasic in the 1990s, and was probably pretty important to my understanding of what a programming language even was. Here I had the source code to a game that I could modify and just see what happens, and maybe learn something about what all of those funny little words that made up a programming language were all about. Read more

Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS

Your small business needs to grow, there's no doubt about that. Expansion is the name of the game when you have a one or two man company, and you're going to want to bring on at least 20 or more people to really get the cogs grinding. And if you're working on a digital interface, slowly phasing pen and paper out of the office you operate in, you're going to need plenty of people around to oil the engine and keep the tech in a usable state. Because of this, technology helps your small business grow, and can do quite a few wonders for the time and effort you invested into it. Even if you're working on a minimal budget, there's quite a few option to look into to make sure you've got just as much of a chance as the shop next door to you that seems to have a never ending stream of customers. After all, you've got to get your internal processes working perfectly first, and with a bit of technological aid, you might manage that faster than you first thought. Read more

Security: Polkit, CSP, Ansible and Router Hardening Checklist

  • Polkit CVE-2018-19788 vs. SELinux
  • Why is your site not using Content Security Policy / CSP?
    Yesterday, I had the pleasure of watching on Frikanalen the OWASP talk by Scott Helme titled "What We’ve Learned From Billions of Security Reports". I had not heard of the Content Security Policy standard nor its ability to "call home" when a browser detect a policy breach (I do not follow web page design development much these days), and found the talk very illuminating. The mechanism allow a web site owner to use HTTP headers to tell visitors web browser which sources (internal and external) are allowed to be used on the web site. Thus it become possible to enforce a "only local content" policy despite web designers urge to fetch programs from random sites on the Internet, like the one enabling the attack reported by Scott Helme earlier this year.
  • Red Hat Ansible Playbooks Password Exposure Vulnerability [CVE-2018-16859]
    CVE-2018-16859. A vulnerability in Red Hat Ansible could allow a local attacker to discover plaintext passwords on a targeted system.
  • Router Hardening Checklist