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Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Reproducible builds: week 56 in Stretch cycle
  • Adopting pristine-tar

    As of yesterday, I am the new maintainer of pristine-tar. As it is the case for most of Joey Hess’ creations, it is an extremely useful tool, and used in a very large number of Debian packages which are maintained in git.

    My first upload was most of a terrain recognition nature: I did some housekeeping tasks, such as making the build idempotent and making sure all binaries are built with security hardening flags, and wrote a few automated test cases to serve as build-time and run-time regression test suite. No functional changes have been made.

  • No Audio in Lubuntu? - Lubuntu Audio Configuration and Volume Control
  • Vulkan Support Might Be Implemented in Ubuntu Linux's Mir Display Server Soon

    As many of you might already know, Canonical is working hard these days on pushing the Unity 8 user interface and its convergence vision to the Ubuntu desktop.

    Unity 8 is the next-generation Unity desktop environment for the popular GNU/Linux operating system, Ubuntu Linux, and Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth promised earlier this month that it would be available, installed by default, in the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) release.

    Installed by default does not mean enabled by default, as Unity 7 will remain the main desktop environment for Ubuntu 16.10, which should see the light of day later this year, on October 20, 2016. And, of course, the new Unity 8 interface will be ready for use, without the need for users to install any special packages.

Why Linus Torvalds Doesn’t Like Using Debian Or Ubuntu Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Debian
Ubuntu

From the past 25 years, Linus Torvalds is working tirelessly to make Linux a more efficient and user-friendly computing platform. His creation is now available to the open source lovers in the form of many Linux distros that serve a wide variety of users.

Linux and open source software support the idea of choice and it acts as their driving force. However, with time, the internet is filled with tons of Linux distros based on Debian and Ubuntu-like feature

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Raspberry Pi-based signage stack gets Snappy

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The Screenly signage software for the Raspberry Pi is being converted to Ubuntu Snappy Core, enabling OTA updates and transactional rollbacks.

Canonical and Screenly, which makes what it calls “the most popular digital signage solution for the Raspberry Pi,” have announced a partnership to build the Screenly signage stack on Ubuntu Snappy Core. Screenly, which is currently available in commercial (Pro) and free, open source “OSE” versions based on Raspbian Linux, is adopting the lightweight, transaction-oriented Ubuntu Core “to give its customers a stable platform that is secure, robust, simple to use and manage,” says Screenly.

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Leftovers: Devuan and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Fork Devuan Beta Released

    A team of developers made good on their threats to fork Debian Linux late last year, after the community’s leadership voted to replace sysvinit with systemd, making systemd the default init boot process.

  • A Telegram Snap Package Is Available on Ubuntu 16.04

    Using Ubuntu 16.04 and want to install the official Telegram Linux app?

    Don’t run off to the official website to get the official binary: there’s now a Telegram app snap package available on Ubuntu 16.04.

  • Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition: a tablet that runs like a desktop

    At first, the Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition — often called the Ubuntu tablet — resembles most modern tablets, with a hard plastic case that folds into a stand, limited multi-tasking from an overview screen, and some ability to act like a workstation or laptop. However, even a tentative exploration reveals that the Ubuntu Edition is much more, due mostly to its operating system and the Unity interface, which comes of age at last on this tablet.

  • Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition Review
  • UbuntuBuzz Magazine #11 - Converting PDF
  • UbuntuBuzz Magazine #10 - sK1
  • NoNotifications: Use Do Not Disturb Feature in Ubuntu

    If you are trying to focus on your work and don't want to disable notifications completely then here is a tool called "NoNotifications" for you, which works in Ubuntu Unity. It is just a simple panel indicator which allows you to disable notification temporarily. This tool should be enhanced to offer more features like mobile OS's already have, to completely disable everything Like: tones, alerts, notifications, and so, and schedule a time to activate/deactivate could be a plus for this small application.

  • Temporarily Disable Notifications In Ubuntu (w/ Unity 7) With NoNotifications Indicator

    NoNotifications is a simple indicator for Ubuntu (Unity 7) that allows you to temporarily suppress NotifyOSD notifications. The tool is useful for presentations, when working, and so on, to prevent unwanted notifications from getting in your way or distracting you.

  • Ubuntu’s Got Tablet, Fedora’s Kernel Decision & More…

    Back in the hippie days there was a lot of talk about plastic people, which would be fake people. Back in those days, plastic people were to be avoided, as was plastic anything.

    How times have changed. These days we embrace a plastic world. As example, we replace carefully hand crafted wristwatches made to last a lifetime with electronic rhinestone wearables that will be obsolete in a year or two because they tell us how fast and how seldom we walk.

    You see, by the ’60s definition, plastic didn’t need to be made of plastic to be plastic. You dig?

    [...]

    Swapnil Bhartiya at CIO found BQ’s hardware to be more than up to the task and also thought that nearly all aspects of the Ubuntu Touch with convergence to be beyond super fantastic. Gesture swiping is amazing, Scopes are the best thing since sliced bread, and using convergence to run in full blown desktop mode is “one of it’s greatest features.” The App Store, which he calls the “most exciting part of this Ubuntu tablet,” disappoints him because despite having tons of cool apps he’s never seen offered for phones before, it doesn’t have a few things he likes.

    “After using the tablet for a while,” he opines, “I had to face the harsh reality that as much as wanted to like the tablet, the lack of what I consider essential native apps will prevent me from using it as my primary, or even as a secondary, device.”

    The only apps he mentions that he would like but which are MIA? “[N]one of the streaming services such as Netflix, Hulu or Amazon Prime are available on the device.”

    Maybe he should just buy himself a TV.

    [...]

    In case you missed it, the conference live streamed Corey Doctorow’s Thursday morning keynote address, called “Open, Closed, and Demon Haunted: An Internet of Things That Act Like Inkjet Printers,” along with all other keynotes throughout the event. Included below is a short snippet of the talk that’s available on YouTube. Doctorow’s complete talk is available online, but requires the opening of an account with O’Reilly in order to view it.

  • Cinnamon 3.0 - See What's New

    Cinnamon 3.0 is the latest release of Cinnamon Desktop Environment and it will become as default desktop for upcoming Linux Mint 18 codenamed "sarah".

Xubuntu Xenial Xerus - Triple X - The spy who failed me

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

Before you read this conclusion, please do me a favor. Please read my review of Vivid, then go back up, find the links to the Werewolf review and the best distro of 2015 summary, and then read those, too. Then, come back to this piece here. Now, please try to explain, in human lingo, how it is possible than only one year apart, we get such a huge, drastic difference in the distro behavior.

Xubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus is meant to be the rock-solid LTS, beautiful and elegant and majestic. It is none of that. There are so many bugs and problems it really turns me off the whole Linux thing. I feel like an idiot for doing these reviews, for wasting hundreds and thousands of hours of my life trying to promote a cause and technology that ultimately just ends up failing randomly, because people can't be bothered to invest time in proper QA rather than pointless, arbitrary release dates and silly changes that serve no purpose.

Not good. Not good at all. Realtek issues, mouse going away after waking from sleep, login niggles, package management woes, sucky Bluetooth stack, Thunar hiccups, Samba crap. This is just a short list of everything that's wrong with Xenial, and then, to make it even worse, the Unity and the Xfce versions can't really agree on the suck list. They all have their own unique problems, and there's no consistency. I'm just pissed off. April 2016 was meant to be a happy, cheerful month. Now, I'm facing total destruction and distros that barely work. And yes, please, skip to the very end, and tell me how it's all my fault. Anyhow, Xubuntu Xerus gets only 3/10. Do not upgrade for now.

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Also: Xubuntu 16.04 - install and enjoy?

Mozilla Firefox 46.0.1 Lands in the Ubuntu Repos, But No Sign of Thunderbird 45

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Canonical recently pushed the first point release of the Mozilla Firefox 46.0 web browser to the stable channels for all supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, along with Mozilla Thunderbird 38.8.0.

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Open-spec, octa-core “NanoPi M3” SBC sells for $35

Filed under
Android
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

FriendlyARM’s NanoPi M3 SBC runs Linux or Android on a 64-bit, octa-core Samsung S5P6818, and offers WiFi, BT, GbE, and a 40-pin RPi connector.

In April, FriendlyARM blew away the scant competition in octa-core, 64-bit hacker SBCs with its $60 NanoPC-T3 board. Now it has stepped even harder on the affordability scale with a smaller, somewhat stripped down NanoPi M3 featuring the same Samsung S5P6818 octa-core SoC. The open-spec, community-backed boards sells for only $35, plus $10 shipping to the U.S.

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BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu tablet - Convergence in action

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Being able to use your smartphone as a desktop has a lot of allure to lots of people. Phones and tablets are all nice and dandy, but due to evolutionary factors explained in a related article, they are not really useful for anything but passive enjoyment of content. You simply cannot get the same type and/or amount of speed, efficiency, productivity, and multi-tasking like you can on a keyboard-and-mouse device. Plus money.

But what if you could transform your touch device into a would-be desktop? Sounds good, and this is what Convergence is. Dubbed various names and titles, this element of the M10 Ubuntu tablet sounds like an excellent selling point. I've already given you a review of what the hardware and the operating system can do, but we did not dwell on the desktop-like usage. We will do that now.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Summer of Reproducible Builds

    What is Outreachy? You might not know! Let me empower you: Outreachy is an organization connecting woman and minorities to mentors in the free (as in freedom) software community, /and/ funding for three months to work with the mentors and contribute to a free software project. If you are a woman or minority human that likes free software, or if you know anyone in this situation, please tell them about Outreachy Or put them in touch with me, I'd happily tell them more.

  • Puppet 4 uploaded to Debian experimental

    I’ve uploaded puppet 4.4.2-1 to Debian experimental.

  • Accidental data-store ..

    My code is reliable, the implementation is almost painfully simple, and the only difference in my design is that rather than having an API-server which allows both "uploads" and "downloads" I split it into two - that means you can leave your "download" server open to the world, so that it can be useful, and your upload-server can be firewalled to only allow a few hosts to access it.

  • Accidental data-store .. is go!

    I might not be cool, but I did indeed rewrite it in golang. It was quite simple, and a simple benchmark of uploading two million files, balanced across 4 nodes worked perfectly.

  • Digital Signage Solution, Screenly, Chooses Canonical’s Ubuntu Core
  • 10 things you should know about the BQ Aquaris M10 tablet

    If you've been following me for awhile here, you've probably noticed I've started giving Ubuntu Touch a bit more coverage. There's a reason for that. Once you get your hands on such a device, you discover just how powerful a tablet can be. Since most people haven't picked up the BQ Aquaris M10 tablet, I thought I would shed some light on the issue, so that you can decide for yourself if it's a device you should own.

    Before I get into this, know that you can purchase one of the Ubuntu Touch-powered BQ tablets now. The price is, relatively speaking, low (€279.90, or roughly $320.00 USD). But for some, shelling out even that much cash for unproven tech is steep. And for the average consumer (and even the IT pro) Ubuntu Touch is just that: unproven.

BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition review: A rocky start to a new era

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Let me be clear. In reviewing the Aquaris M10, I was very aware that I was reviewing not just the device but the Ubuntu mobile platform. In fact, the review is less about the device than about where Ubuntu stands now in the tablet space and the potential and possibilities the future holds.

Ubuntu mobile is a very promising platform; it just needs some constructive feedback so that developers can improve the user experience. I consider this tablet something similar to Google Glass: a prototype that gives you a glimpse of what to expect from Ubuntu on tablets.

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More in Tux Machines

Q4OS 1.4.12 Distro Receives the Latest Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" Updates

The Q4OS team have informed Softpedia today, June 27, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of a new maintenance release in the stable "Orion" series of the Debian-based GNU/Linux operating system. Q4OS 1.4.12 "Orion" is now the latest and most advanced version of the distribution build around the Trinity desktop environment, and it has received all the important security patches and software updates from the upstream Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" repositories, along with a couple of other improvements requested by users. Read more

Linux 4.7 RC5

  • Linux 4.7-rc5 Kernel Released
    The fifth weekly test release to the Linux 4.7 kernel is now available for testing. As of writing this article, Linus Torvalds has yet to send out an official 4.7-rc5 announcement but it's available for those interested in the latest installment of the kernel that's codenamed the Psychotic Stoned Sheep.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces Linux Kernel 4.7 RC5, Things Are Calming Down
    Another Sunday, another Release Candidate build of the upcoming Linux 4.7 kernel is out for testing, as announced by Linus Torvalds himself a few hours ago, June 26, 2016.
  • Linux 4.7-rc5
    Another week, another -rc. Hmm. I think things are calming down, although with almost two thirds of the commits coming in since Friday morning, it doesn't feel that way - my Fridays end up feeling very busy. But looking at the numbers, we're pretty much where we normally are at this time of the rc series. The stats looks fairly normal: about half the patch is drivers, roughly a quarter is architecture updates, and the remainder is "misc": filesystems, scheduler, mm, etc. The bulk of the drivers is GPU updates, but there's a smattering of rdma, hwmon, Xen, gpio, sound. The architecture side is powerpc, x86, some arm64, and some noise all over from some MM cleanups.. Go out and test. By -rc5, we really should be starting to be getting fairly ready. And please, if Thorsten Leemhuis is tracking one of your regressions, can you make sure to double-check it and see if it remains? It's lovely to have a regression tracker again, but it would also be really good to make sure that the ones that are solved get closed. Linus

Android Leftovers

The Internet Without Connection, Free Endless OS For Emerging Markets

There are four billion people on the planet without PCs or access to affordable personal computers. That figure should surely be tempered with some contextualization i.e. not everybody actually wants to have an Internet connection and many traditional, native or bucolic ways of live do still exist on the planet. Regardless, there are a batch of global initiatives in existence which seek to give computer access to every man, woman and especially child. Endless OS is one such project. The free operating system has been designed explicitly to work in the expensive or restrictive Internet data conditions that often exist in emerging markets where fabulously affordable broadband has yet to arrive. The software itself is built to provide useful information and educational content, with or without an Internet connection. Read more