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Ubuntu

Software radio apps are open-source on Ubuntu App Store

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Ubuntu

Lime Micro (London, UK) has announced that Ubuntu is putting together an App Store for LimeSDR that can be accessed once the LimeSDR crowd funding campaign successfully reaches its $500,000 pledge goal. The Snappy Ubuntu App Store will ensure the software defined radio (SDR) apps developed with the LimeSDR board are downloadable and those developed by Lime remain completely open-sourced.

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Peppermint 7 Could Land on June 30, Will Be an LTS Release Based on Ubuntu 16.04

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

In a brief Google+ announcement, the Peppermint OS developers have informed the community about the possible upcoming availability of the Peppermint 7 Linux operating system.

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Ubuntu phone is not yet ready for prime time

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Ubuntu

Phones that run Canonical's Ubuntu Phone operating system have been around for more than a year but given that they appear to be predominantly aimed at European markets, they are a rare sight in Australia.

One cannot blame Canonical, the company behind the phone, for Australia is a very small market and one that tends to follow American trends.

The first Ubuntu phones were released in February 2015 and came in for some criticism because they were under-powered, being a modified version of the Aquaris E4.5. With a 4.5-inch, 540x960 resolution display, a 1.3GHz quad-core MediaTek Cortex A7 processor, 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage, they were not much to write home about.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • New APT signing key for code.liw.fi/debian
  • More work on aptitude

    The last few months have been a bit of a crazy period of ups and downs, with a tempest of events beneath the apparent and deceivingly calm surface waters of being unemployed (still at it).

  • Snaps - A Good Way to Test the Latest Apps

    If you've been following the latest Ubuntu news around the traps, you've probably heard about Canonical's "Snappy" system. We actually did an article on Snappy back in late 2014 when the project had just started to surface. As of the latest Ubuntu 16.04 LTS release, the core program 'snapd' is included out of the box, allowing you to install 'Snaps' right away.

  • Linux App Distribution Gets A Little Easier With 'Snap'
  • Community Appreciation Day

    Today is Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day, but this year I am going to expand my appreciation beyond the boundaries of the Ubuntu Community to include anyone in open source that has impacted my journey in open source.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu: Quick install guide

    Honestly, modern Linux is easier, faster and less hassle to install than any recent release of Windows. That's the truth. No messing with keys, no worrying about activation and no digging out that lost install disc or USB drive.

    The beauty of Linux is that because it's free software anyone can download (or pop in a disc) and start using it. You don't even have to install anything! Linux technology and its free and easy licence means that it can be run straight off a CD or DVD.

  • Canonical Goes Snap Happy, Nextcloud 9 Released & More…

    When karma comes to visit, the one thing to remember is that in some way — which might even seem totally unrelated — you have some responsibility for that karmic bite. The best thing to do is to accept it with grace and to move on. I tell you this because that should give you a pretty fair assessment of what my life has been like since the last Week in Review.

    But it hasn’t all been bad karma. There’s been good news on the FOSS front as well…

  • Oh SNAP, and there’s the Devil

    I don’t know how else to put it. I’m sorry. It’s bad. It’s bad in my opinion, not fact. My opinion, is my expectation, will only turn fact by the time it is too late to do anything about it.

    It’s like, “why back-up anything?” — well, you’ll know when you’ve lost everything. In other words, when it is just slightly beyond way too fucking late.

  • Snappy Moves to New Platforms

    Canonical's Snappy package manager is taking its first steps outside the Ubuntu world. As of now, you can install it on Arch, Debian, Fedora and several other popular distros. And with developers like Mozilla getting behind it, it could soon become a new "universal standard".

  • Ubuntu’s SNAPS now available to other Linux Distros
  • Canonical and Chef Add DevOps Options with Habitat and Snap Packages

    DockerCon hasn't even started yet, but the channel has already seen two major open source DevOps announcements. Here's an overview of the latest news from Canonical about snap packages and Chef about its new app automation platform, Habitat.

  • App distribution for Linux just got way better

    Ubuntu's "snap" package format now works on a bunch of other popular Linux distros, including Arch, Debian, Fedora, and most of the Ubuntu flavors. It's also coming to CentOS, Mint, OpenSUSE, and even OpenWrt, among others.

  • Goodbye rpm and deb. Hello Snaps!

On Snappy and Flatpak: business as usual in the Canonical propaganda department

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Ubuntu

You may have read some stuff this week about an application delivery mechanism called Snappy and how it’s going to unite all distributions and kill apt and rpm!

This is, to put it diplomatically, a heaping pile of steaming bullshit. You may not be surprised to learn that said pile has been served by the Canonical press department.

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Entroware Releases Powerful Linux Gaming Laptop with Ubuntu or Ubuntu MATE 16.04

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Ubuntu

Today, June 16, 2016, Entroware, a British hardware manufacturer known for building laptops with Ubuntu or Ubuntu MATE GNU/Linux operating system pre-installed, had the great pleasure to inform Softpedia about an exciting new product.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE Linux: It’s Not Rocket Science

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Ubuntu

Granted, this was no deep dive into the belly of the beast, but it was a positive first step in introducing me to the world of Linux on a machine that was otherwise gathering dust in my closet. In comparison to how it ran with Windows XP, I was impressed with how quickly everything responded in Ubuntu MATE — though cautiously optimistic because I know that’s how it tends to go with newly installed operating systems. It’s only been a week so far since the installation, so I’ll see if it still plays nicely after being shackled to my habitually unreasonable human demands for a little longer.

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More in Tux Machines

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more

Xubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Released, Upgrade Path from Xubuntu 14.04 LTS Now Open

The first point release of the Xubuntu 16.04 LTS computer operating system has been officially published as part of the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) announcement earlier in the week. Read more