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Ubuntu

Lubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) PowerPC Daily Build ISOs to No Longer Be Produced

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Ubuntu

Lubuntu developer Simon Quigley is announcing today, February 7, 2017, the upcoming deprecation of daily build ISO images for the PowerPC (PPC) hardware architecture for the upcoming Lubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system.

As you probably know already, the Ubuntu Linux developers discussed last year the removal of support for 32-bit PowerPC systems, which means that starting with Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) there won't be any ISO images available to let you install Ubuntu or any of the official flavors on the PowerPC (PPC) 32-bit architecture.

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Ubuntu Linux daddy Mark Shuttleworth: Carrots for Unity 8?

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Ubuntu

New year, new Linux – or, in the case of Ubuntu, two. As in years past, Canonical's distro gets two updates in 2017 – the spring and autumn releases numbered and named respectively 17.04, Zesty Zapus, and 17.10 – name TBD, actually.

As ever there will be UI and experience fiddling – Zesty Zapus sees changes in windows management, the organisation of applications and there a new Mir abstraction is planned called Miral.

What about some really big changes, like the Unity 8 shell and Mir itself?

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Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Tails 3.0 will require a 64-bit processor

    Tails 3.0 will require a 64-bit x86-64 compatible processor. As opposed to older versions of Tails, it will not work on 32-bit processors.

    We have waited for years until we felt it was the right time to do this switch. Still, this was a hard decision for us to make. Today, we want to explain why we eventually made this decision, how it will affect users, and when.

  • [Video] Ubuntu Testing Day - Ubuntu Core and QEMU
  • [Video] Ubuntu Unity 8 - Phone, Tablet, Desktop
  • Conky Alternative Weather Widget "Cumulus" Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    We have many conky versions with super easy installation, you can check conky collection. Cumulus is a free, open source and elegant weather widget for Ubuntu, based on Stormcloud, It was formerly known as 'Typhoon', it stays on the desktop just like conky. Unlike conky it offers customization which includes weather metrics 'Celsius' 'Fahrenheit' 'Kelvin' and 'mph' 'kph' 'm/s', and widget color can be changed directly from settings, depending on user needs. It can be setup to show in all Workspaces, we will show you below how to setup.

  • Looking for Swami Control Panel Testers

    Last time I really talked about our control panel rewrite for Moksha, Swami, was over a year ago. Because last year was a new major release, most of my Bodhi team went into preparing that and making sure it was functional (we are just volunteers after all). This year however, not only do we not have a major release to work on, but I am traveling less for work. This gives me a bit more time to work on Bodhi related things. Today I am happy to share there is a new version of Swami in the repositories ready for some testing. It contains four modules:

IoT gateway runs Ubuntu on Apollo Lake

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Ubuntu

Gigabyte’s “EL-30” IoT gateway offers a Pentium N4200, 8GB DDR3L, 32GB eMMC, dual GbE and HDMI, wide-range power, plus WiFi, BT, and optional 3G and ZigBee.

Gigabyte has unveiled an IoT gateway that taps Intel’s new 14nm fabricated “Apollo Lake” chips, in this case the quad-core, 1.1/2.5GHz Pentium N4200 with 6W TDP. The EL-30 follows a series of Intel Braswell-based EL-20 IoT gateways, which are primarily promoted as being Windows and Android devices, but also support Ubuntu. By contrast, the EL-30, which is due to ship in the second quarter, gives Ubuntu 16.04 LTS equal billing with Windows 10 IoT, Windows 10, and Android Nougat (7.0).

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Debian and Ubuntu

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Fun in January 2017
  • First Tails beta release based on Stretch

    Today, I have released the first beta for Tails 3.0, that will be the first version of Tails based on Debian 9 (Stretch).

    Our automated test suite pretends it works pretty well and matches our safety expectations. I'm inclined to trust it. But as we learned after porting Tails to Squeeze, Wheezy and Jessie: quick, exploratory testing of pre-releases will not identify all the remaining regressions.

  • Mir Display Server Lands API Changes, Relicenses Headers To LGPL

    Canonical's Mir developers are working to get Mir 1.0 released in 2017 and in preparation for that stable milestone they have just landed a number of API changes.

    Just a few days ago we were talking about the Mir 0.26 features while the latest Mir happenings is a number of API changes. Today there were a number of new APIs published for the Mir client library, the Mir render surface APIs were deprecated, and other API changes.

Ubuntu Developers Still Tracking Linux Kernel 4.10 for Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

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Ubuntu

The development of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system continues at a fast pace, and Ubuntu Kernel team is hard at work these days testing the latest Release Candidates of Linux 4.10 kernel.

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Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.26 Snap Creator Tool for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, 16.10

    Canonical's Sergio Schvezov published today, February 1, 2017, a new stable update of the Snapcraft utility that Open Source application developers can use to package their apps as Snaps.

    Snappy is Canonical's application sandboxing and distribution framework and Snap is a universal binary format designed to allow devs to distribute their apps across multiple Linux-based operating systems without having to create a special package for each distro. Snapcraft is the tool to build the Snap packages.

    The latest version, Snapcraft 2.26, comes approximately two weeks after the release of version 2.25 and promises to introduce a bunch of new features, such as support for GUI (Graphical User Interface) in Snaps, a new plugin directory location, support for snapcraft.yaml in a Snap directory, as well as support for go-packages.

  • Canonical Releases Important OpenSSL Updates for Ubuntu to Fix 6 Vulnerabilities

    Canonical's Marc Deslauriers announced earlier the availability of updated OpenSSL packages for all supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, which address several vulnerabilities discovered recently.

    According to to Ubuntu Security Notice USN-3181-1, it would appear that a total of six security issues were fixed by various developers in the OpenSSL packages included in Ubuntu. These packages provide the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) cryptographic library and tools needed by various applications.

  • System76 Rolls Out A NVIDIA-Powered GPU Linux Server
  • System76 Launches Ubuntu-Powered Ibex Pro GPU Server with Up to 40K CUDA Cores

    System76, the Colorado-based computer manufacturer specializing in delivering state-of-the-art desktop, notebook, server machines with Linux-based operating systems pre-installed on them, is announcing today the launch of the Ibex Pro GPU server.

    The company, which many of you know for their powerful Ubuntu-based computers, is kicking off the new year with a brand-new GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) server dubbed Ibex Pro. The focus has been on creating an innovative and extremely powerful server that would help scientists and engineers achieve their research productivity goals on advancing machine learning algorithms, rendering 3D graphics, or simulating complex systems.

  • Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 9 Due to Serious Boot Regression

    If you were expecting to upgrade to the second point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on February 2, you'd have to wait one more week because Canonical has just delayed its launch for another week.

    Ubuntu kernel manager Leann Ogasawara is reporting today, January 31, 2017, that her team recently identified a serious boot regression on AArch64 (ARM64) hardware, and it could take a few more days for the developers to patch the issue, which will require them to push new versions of the Linux kernel and other related packages.

Leftovers: Debian and Ubuntu

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Scratch group projects – 2017

    It’s January, so it must be time for this year’s Scratch projects from my grade 10 students. We’re moving on to python, but I’ve posted their projects at http://scratch.lesbg.com Feel free to play them and rate them. This is a first attempt for students, so do please be gentle on the ratings.

  • Free software activities in January 2017
  • My Free Software Activities in January 2017

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

  • Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed A Second Time

    Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS was supposed to ship in mid-January and then up until today was expected to be released on Thursday. But now it's being delayed at least one more week.

    Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS had been delayed due to some parts of its hardware enablement (HWE) stack being changed, they decided in mid-January to push back the release to 2 February. Now today they've decided to delay it a second time due to an unrelated problem.

Meet the $114,725 Ubuntu server with eight Nvidia Tesla P100 GPUs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

The Ibex Pro is one supercharged machine that will probably hurt your electric bill.

System76's fastest Ibex Pro with Ubuntu Server 16.10 packs some crazy horsepower with Intel's latest 22-core Xeon E5 v4 chips and eight Nvidia Tesla P100 graphics processors.

It's got the same number of GPUs as Nvidia's superfast DGX-1, which is being used for deep learning. System76 is targeting the Ibex Pro -- which is a rack server -- at the same market as the DGX-1. The server has fewer, but newer, CPUs, compared to the DGX-1.

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Top Ubuntu Mistakes: How to Avoid Ubuntu Problems

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu and similar distros are widely considered to be as simple as it gets. With GUI installers, being FoSS friendly is easy. For the most part, 98% of the best user experience possible is found out of the box by default.

But what about the other 2%? This article will address the top mistakes made by newer Ubuntu users and offer advice on how to avoid those Ubuntu snafus.

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Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.