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Ubuntu

LOL! Google Thinks Arch Linux is Based on Ubuntu

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Search ‘Ubuntu based distros’ on Google and laugh at the recommendations as Google shows Arch, Debian etc in the search result.

Ubuntu is based on Debian. Debian is not based on other distribution. Arch Linux is a distribution independent of Debian or any other Linux distribution.

This is what every Linux user already knows.

But not Google, apparently.

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System76 Adds Nvidia Titan V GPU Support to Its Ubuntu-Based Pop!_OS Linux OS

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OS
Ubuntu

The company is currently working hard on Pop!_OS Linux 18.04, a release that's based on Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system and built around the GNOME desktop environment. One essential feature of the next Pop!_OS Linux release appears to be support for Nvidia's Titan V GPUs.

"We now have support for the NVIDIA Titan V, one of the most powerful GPUs on the market today! One of the value adds we do as a company is the ability to quickly incorporate support for new hardware. It’s available in our latest ISO if you want to check it out," said System76 in their latest blog announcement.

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Here's everything new coming to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release date, new features, upgrade procedure and everything important associated with it.
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Ubuntu and Mint Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04's Automatic Suspend Shows Linux Suspend Can Still Be An Issue In 2018

    One of the subtle changes that seemed to have been made during the Ubuntu 18.04 development cycle is automatic suspend now being enabled by default on desktop systems.

    Automatic suspend is flipped on with Ubuntu 18.04 desktop after a twenty minute delay of being idle, at least on several systems I've been running the daily Bionic Beaver with this month.

  • Bid “bonjour” to our Bionic Beaver!

    Along with a sneak preview of our official Bionic mascot, it’s a short update this week as we’re all heads-down in bug fixing mode. There are a couple of links to check out if you’re interested in what sort of data we want to collect about hardware and setup, with links to the source.

  • MintBox Mini 2

    Based on the Compulab Fitlet2, the new Mini is just as small as the original MintBox Mini and the MintBox Mini Pro but with much better specifications, better performance and a few more features.

Logic Supply launches tiny, fanless, Ubuntu-powered PCs

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Ubuntu
  • Logic Supply launches tiny, fanless, Ubuntu-powered PCs

    Industrial PC maker Logic Supply has been offering small fanless computers for years, but the company says its new CL200 series PCs are its smallest to date.

    Powered by an Intel Celeron N3350 dual-core processor, the little computer measures just 4.6″ x 3.3″ x 1.3″, making it smaller than a typical Intel NUC computer.

  • Logic Supply CL200 Apollo Lake Mini PC Introduced

    Logic Supply has today unveiled two new additions to their range of small form factor computer systems announcing the launch of the Logic Supply CL200, designed for Internet of things projects and applications and offering users connectivity via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and 4G. The CL200 mini PC systems will be available to purchase during Spring 2018 an offer one mini DisplayPort capable of 1080p or 4K resolution, one Gigabit LAN port, and 2 x USB 3.0.

  • Logic Supply Introduces CL200 Computer

    Global computer hardware manufacturer Logic Supply has unveiled their CL200 computer, built to power innovation at the network’s edge. Surrounded by a cast aluminum enclosure, and configurable with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and 4G connectivity, the CL200 has been engineered to bring reliability to the Internet of Things.

  • Logic Supply launches CL200 ultra small form factor IoT edge device

    Global computer hardware manufacturer Logic Supply (www.logicsupply.com) has unveiled their CL200 Ultra Small Form Factor computer (www.logicsupply.com/cl200), built to power innovation at the network's edge. Surrounded by an ultra-durable cast aluminum enclosure, and configurable with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and 4G connectivity, the CL200 has been engineered to bring reliability to the Internet of Things.

    "IoT and Edge projects require flexibility, connectivity and dependability," said Logic Supply Director of Engineering Michael Kleiner. "The CL200 is our smallest fanless system ever, and represents the nextgeneration of IoT computing by combining connection flexibility and efficient performance in an affordable, highly-reliable platform."

This is the New Ubuntu 18.04 Default Wallpaper

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Ubuntu

You’re gawping at the brand new Ubuntu 18.04 default wallpaper.

Yes, seriously!

The new background image will make its appearance of tens of millions of desktops with the Ubuntu 18.04 release on April 26, 2018.

Like the Ubuntu 17.10 ‘Artful Aardvark’ background new wallpaper incorprates the release mascot (which for this release is a ‘Bionic Beaver’) and is drawn using a geometric-come-origami style.

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Node.js Is Now Available as a Snap on Ubuntu, Other GNU/Linux Distributions

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Ubuntu

Now that Linux is the preferred development platform for developers visiting Stack Overflow, the need for running the latest versions of your favorite programming languages, frameworks and development environments has become more and more important, and Canonical's Snappy technologies are the answer.

NodeSource, the organization behind Node.js, announced today they made a Snap package to allow Linux developers to more easily install the popular JavaScript runtime environment on their operating systems. Snap is a containerized, universal binary package format developed by Canonical for Ubuntu Linux.

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Which Linux Distribution to Use After Ubuntu?

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu is one of the best Linux distributions for beginners. It’s an excellent platform for people new to Linux. It is easy to install, has tons of free resources available along with a massive list of applications available for it.

I am not saying Ubuntu is strictly for new Linux users. I have been using Ubuntu as my primary operating system for more than eight years and I just love it.

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Ubuntu Preps to Remove Qt 4 Support from the Archives, Target Ubuntu 19.04

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Ubuntu

With Qt 5 being largely adopted by Qt application developers and other major projects, such as the KDE Plasma desktop environment, the Qt 4 technologies are becoming obsolete, so more and more GNU/Linux distributions plan its complete removal from the software repositories.

Debian Project's Qt/KDE teams are already preparing to remove Qt 4 support from the repositories of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series mainly because it's getting harder and harder to maintain it now that it is no longer supported upstream, and may cause lots of problems system-wide.

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Ubuntu: Logic Supply and Linux 4.15/Linux 4.16

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Ubuntu
  • Tiny Apollo Lake based mini-PCs run Ubuntu

    Logic Supply unveiled two 116 x 83 x 34mm mini-PCs built around a Celeron N3350: a CL200 with 3x USB ports and a CL210 that doubles memory to 2GB LPDDR4 and 32GB eMMC, and adds a second mini-DP and GbE port.

    Logic Supply announced its smallest mini-PCs to date with CL200 and CL210 models that measure just 116 x 83 x 34mm. The CL200 ships with Ubuntu 16.04 while the more advanced CL210 also offers Windows 10 IoT. Both of these “IoT Edge Device” mini-PCs tap Intel’s dual-core, 1.1GHz Celeron N3350 with 6W TDP from the Apollo Lake generation, and support digital media, data acquisition, automation, and network gateway applications.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Continues Prepping With The Linux 4.15 Kernel

    There were various calls by independent end-users voicing their two cents that Ubuntu 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" should ship with Linux 4.16 instead of Linux 4.15, but that isn't going to happen.

    In several different places the past few weeks I've seen various remarks made of how "Ubuntu 18.04 should ship with Linux 4.16" on the basis of either better Spectre/Meltdown support, Linux 4.16 will be out in time and neither 4.15 or 4.16 are even LTS releases, better hardware support, or users simply wanting all the goodies in Linux 4.16. But that's simply foolish given Ubuntu 18.04 is being a Long Term Support release and how close the timing ends up being as is.

  • Kernel Team summary: March 21, 2018

    On the road to 18.04 we have a 4.15 based kernel in the Bionic repository.

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More in Tux Machines

Critical Live Boot Bug Fixed and Ubuntu 18.04 is Finally Released

A critical bug in live boot session delayed Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release for several hours. The bug has been fixed and the ISO are available to download. Read more

Nintendo Switch hack + Dolphin Emulator could bring GameCube and Wii game support

This week security researchers released details about a vulnerability affecting NVIDIA Tegra X1 processors that makes it possible to bypass secure boot and run unverified code on some devices… including every Nintendo Switch game console that’s shipped to date. Among other things, this opens the door for running modified versions of Nintendo’s firmware, or alternate operating systems such as a GNU/Linux distribution. And if you can run Linux… you can also run Linux applications. Now it looks like one of those applications could be the Dolphin emulator, which lets you play Nintendo GameCube and Wii games on a computer or other supported devices. Read more

Openwashing Leftovers

Linux Foundation: New Members, Cloud Foundry, and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit

  • 41 Organizations Join The Linux Foundation to Support Open Source Communities With Infrastructure and Resources
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 28 Silver members and 13 Associate members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the shared technology resources, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation. Linux Foundation member contributions help provide the infrastructure and resources that enable the world's largest open collaboration communities.
  • Cloud Foundry for Developers: Architecture
    Back in the olden days, provisioning and managing IT stacks was complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. Getting the resources to do your job could take weeks or months. Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) was the first major step in automating IT stacks, and introduced the self-service provisioning and configuration model. VMware and Amazon were among the largest early developers and service providers. Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) adds the layer to IaaS that provides application development and management. Cloud Foundry is for building Platform as a Service (PaaS) projects, which bundle servers, networks, storage, operating systems, middleware, databases, and development tools into scalable, centrally-managed hardware and software stacks. That is a lot of work to do manually, so it takes a lot of software to automate it.
  • Jonathan Corbet on Linux Kernel Contributions, Community, and Core Needs
    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report. The annual Linux Kernel Development Report, released by The Linux Foundation is the evolution of work Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman had been doing independently for years. The goal of the report is to document various facets of kernel development, such as who is doing the work, what is the pace of the work, and which companies are supporting the work.