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Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu

Applications Missing From Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

I'll be the first person to admit that there are applications missing from Ubuntu. This is also true of other Linux distributions, as well. But I think this is a larger issue with distributions like Ubuntu simply due to its popularity.

This article will share some of the most commonly missed applications that Linux users have expressed interest in seeing ported over.

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Vorke V2 Skylake Ubuntu Mini PC Now Available To Preorder From $350

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Ubuntu

If you are in the market for a new mini PC you might be interested to know that a new version of the popular Vorke V1 small form-factor desktop computer is now available to preorder with prices starting from $350.

For that price the system comes equipped with a Intel Core i5 processor 8GB of RAM, 128GB of storage, and Ubuntu Linux software, with other offerings equipped with a Core i7 Skylake processor if your budget will stretch.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu

More on End of Mythbuntu

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GNU
Linux
Movies
Ubuntu
  • Official Ubuntu Flavor Mythbuntu Linux Is Dead. What About My TV Shows?
  • Mythbuntu Linux Is No More, the Distribution Has Been Officially Discontinued

    Earlier today, November 5, 2016, the team behind the Mythbuntu GNU/Linux distribution sadly announced that the project has been discontinued effective immediately and no new releases will be made.

    Mythbuntu was an operating system based on the widely-used Ubuntu Linux distro and built around the MythTV free and open source digital video recorder (DVR) project. It was an official Ubuntu flavor and used Xfce4 as default desktop environment. The first release of the OS was back when Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) was announced, and the last one was Mythbuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

  • Mythbuntu: So Long and Thanks for All the Fish

    Mythbuntu as a separate distribution will cease to exist. We will take the necessary steps to pull Mythbuntu specific packages from the repositories (17.04 and later) unless someone steps up to take these packages over. MythTV packages in the official repositories and the Mythbuntu PPA will continue to be available and updated at their current rate.

How To Install Linux Mint From USB?

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Linux
Ubuntu

Linux Mint is one of the most popular Linux distribution. Mostly advanced Linux users including LinuxAndUbuntu, it is always suggested to start with Linux Mint. So those who are newbies or thinking to use Linux Mint, here is a complete tutorial on how to install Linux Mint from USB and CD/DVD.

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Mythbuntu Linux Distribution Discontinued

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Ubuntu

The Mythbuntu Linux OS that paired the MythTV HTPC software with an Ubuntu Linux base is being disbanded.

The remaining Mythbuntu crew announced tonight, "It's been a long and fun ride from 7.10, but it's time to turn in our badge...Mythbuntu as a separate distribution will cease to exist. We will take the necessary steps to pull Mythbuntu specific packages from the repositories unless someone steps up to take these packages over. MythTV packages in the official repositories and the Mythbuntu PPA will continue to be available and updated at their current rate."

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Canonical Releases Ubuntu Core 16 (Media Outline)

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 to Introduce New Task Manager with Wallpaper and App Icons

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Ubuntu

One of our readers informs us that the upcoming Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 software update for supported Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet devices will introduce a new task manager that supports wallpaper and app icons.

It's been one and a half months since Canonical released the OTA-13 version of its Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system, and the development of the OTA-14 update has been rather slow during all this time. Those brave enough to use the rc-proposed channel were fortunate to get an early taste of what's coming to the Ubuntu mobile OS.

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With Ubuntu Core 16 Canonical looks to embed itself in the IoT

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Core 16 is released today. Otherwise known as Snappy, it is a pared-back version of the Ubuntu Linux operating system (OS) that's designed for IoT use cases.

On a press call, Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth explained that one key difference between Core 16 and its predecessor is the way the software is distributed. On installing software in Core 15 the individual files were spread out all over the disk, as happens with a desktop OS. In Core 16 it remains as a blob.

"In Ubuntu Core 16 we keep all of the software as compressed and signed files," Shuttleworth said. This both takes up less disk space and is also more secure, he added.

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Also: Ubuntu Core 16 coming to a Raspberry Pi near you

Ubuntu Core 16 gets smaller and snappier

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 Officially Released with Revamped Unity 8 Interface, Fixes

A few moments ago, we've been informed by Canonical's Lukasz Zemczak about the general availability of the long-anticipated Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 software update for Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet devices. Read more Also: Ubuntu OTA-14 Released, Fixes A Number Of Bugs

Cloud convenience is killing the open source database

Open source has never been more important or, ironically, irrelevant. As developers increasingly embrace the cloud to shorten time to market, they're speeding past open source, making it even harder to build an open source business. After all, if open source were largely a way for developers to skirt legal and purchasing departments to get the software they needed when they needed it, the cloud ups that convenience to the nth degree. In Accel's annual business review, the vaunted venture capital firm writes: "'Product' is no longer just the bits of software, it's also how the software is sold, supported, and made successful." The cloud is changing the way all software is consumed, including open source. Read more

Why the operating system matters even more in 2017

Operating systems don't quite date back to the beginning of computing, but they go back far enough. Mainframe customers wrote the first ones in the late 1950s, with operating systems that we'd more clearly recognize as such today—including OS/360 from IBM and Unix from Bell Labs—following over the next couple of decades. Read more

OpenGov Partnership members mull open source policy

The Open Government Partnership (OGP) will suggest to its member governments to create a policy on open source. This week, a draft proposal is to be finalised at the OGP Global Summit in Paris. Read more