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Ubuntu

Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Last month Samsung introduced the 970 Series solid-state drives with the mainstream 970 EVO models and 970 PRO models for professionals/enthusiasts. The 970 Series moves to a 64-layer flash and uses a five-core Phoenix controller. For those curious about the Samsung 970 EVO performance under Linux, I have carried out some quick benchmarks to show off its potential under Ubuntu.

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Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

The new kernel updates are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series and address a total of nine security vulnerabilities affecting the kernels for 64-bit, 32-bit, Raspberry Pi 2, AWS, and GCP systems, as well as cloud environments.

They address a security issue (CVE-2018-1092 and CVE-2018-1093) affecting the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Ubuntu 17.10, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS releases and discovered by Wen Xu in Linux kernel's EXT4 file system implementation, which could allow an attacker to crash the vulnerable system by causing a denial of service when mounting a specially crafted EXT4 file system.

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Devuan, Canonical and Ubuntu

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu
  • Devuan ships second stable cut of its systemd-free Linux

    Systemd-free Linux distro Devuan has released its stable Version 2.0.

    The project's last release candidate was released in May, and as you'd hope, not much has changed between then and full release.

    Because it's written by purists, we should include the full name of the release: it's Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0 ASCII Stable.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 531
  • Empowering developers to embrace Linux

     

    There is a huge opportunity for businesses to embrace new technologies and move their company forward. Open source and snaps are simple solutions, but ones that gives the most vital innovators in a business - developers - the tools they need to be confident in launching some of the world’s most utilised software.    

  • R 3.5.0 on Debian and Ubuntu: An Update

    R 3.5.0 was released a few weeks ago. As it changes some (important) internals, packages installed with a previous version of R have to be rebuilt. This was known and expected, and we took several measured steps to get R binaries to everybody without breakage.

    The question of but how do I upgrade without breaking my system was asked a few times, e.g., on the r-sig-debian list as well as in this StackOverflow question.

Mark Shuttleworth dishes on where Canonical and Ubuntu Linux are going next

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth looked good at OpenStack Summit in Vancouver. Not only were his company Canonical and operating system Ubuntu Linux doing well, but thanks to his microfasting diet, he's lost 40 pounds. Energized and feeling good, he's looking forward to taking Canonical to its initial public offering (IPO) in 2019 and making the company more powerful than ever.

It's taken him longer than expected to IPO Canonical. Shuttleworth explained, "We will do the right thing at the right time. That's not this year, though. There's a process that you have to go through and that takes time. We know what we need to hit in terms of revenue and growth and we're on track."

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Sandwich-style hacker board debuts new quad -A7 Rockchip SoC

Filed under
Android
Linux
Ubuntu

Firefly’s Core-PX3-SEJ COM runs Ubuntu or Android on a new quad -A7 Rockchip PX3-SE SoC. The module is available as part of a $120 Firefly-PX3-SE dev board with -20 to 80℃ support.

Firefly’s SODIMM-style, 67.6 x 40mm Core-PX3-SEJ module runs Android 5.1 or Ubuntu 15.04 on a Rockchip PX3-SE (translated), a new 1.3GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A7 SoC. The $40 module is available in a 1GB RAM/8GB eMMC configuration on a $120, 117 x 85mm Firefly-PX3-SE development board. Other memory configurations may also be available (see spec list below).

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8 MacOS Like Docks for Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
Ubuntu

You might not be running macOS but you’re a GNU/Linux user so you have the option to switch your style up and make your app launcher similar to the dock on macOS.

The dock apps here are top-class so don’t blame me if you have a tough time picking one of them. On the plus side, you can use them all!

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Also: FAI 5.7

Canonical Announces Ubuntu for Amazon’s Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes

Filed under
Ubuntu

Officially launched on Tuesday, Amazon Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (Amazon EKS) is engineered to deliver Kubernetes, the open-source and production-grade container orchestration tool as a managed service on the AWS (Amazon Web Services) cloud computing services. As Ubuntu is the most widely used container host operating system, especially for Kubernetes deployments, it can now be used to host containers in Amazon’s EKS.

"The benefits of Ubuntu optimization by Amazon and Canonical now extend to Amazon’s Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (EKS) with Ubuntu worker nodes hosting high-performance Docker containers in AWS. This creates perfect portability for enterprise container workloads developed on Ubuntu workstations and operated on private infrastructure with Canonical’s distribution of upstream Kubernetes," said Canonical.

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You Can Now Manage Nitrokey Encryption USB Keys in Ubuntu, Other Linux Distros

Filed under
Ubuntu

More and more independent developers are packaging their apps as Snaps, making their deployment a breeze across multiple Linux-based operating systems, for both end users and package maintainers. One of the last such apps that caught our attention is called Nitrokey-app and was created by Szczepan.

Made in Germany by Nitrokey, the Nitrokey encrypted and secure physical USB key protects your online accounts, emails, files, server certificates, and entire disk drives against identity theft, mass surveillance, espionage, and even data loss. It's open source and comes in different flavors for all needs and tastes. Even Purism uses Nitrokey for its privacy-focused Librem laptops and upcoming Linux phone.

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Ubuntu Containers and Ubuntu Budgie Remix

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu to host containers in Amazon’s (EKS) for container portability

    he benefits of Ubuntu optimisation by Amazon and Canonical now extend to Amazon’s Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (EKS) with Ubuntu worker nodes hosting high performance Docker containers in AWS. This creates perfect portability for enterprise container workloads developed on Ubuntu workstations and operated on private infrastructure with Canonical’s distribution of upstream Kubernetes.

    Amazon EKS is a fully automated Kubernetes cluster service on AWS. CDK is Canonical’s distribution of upstream Kubernetes that automates K8s deployment and operations for multiple infrastructure environments such as bare metal, VMware and OpenStack.

    Ubuntu EKS worker nodes are built with the new ‘minimal Ubuntu’ base image, which dramatically shrinks the image size and security cross-section for Ubuntu in AWS.

  • budgie-remix 16.04 - end of support date

    With a heavy heart the Ubuntu Budgie team today announce the end-of-support for our 16.04 budgie-remix edition from the beginning of August 2018.

    We would like to thank the almost quarter of a million downloaders since we first launched budgie-remix back in April 2016 for at least having a look at our fledgling distro.

    We didnt really expect to support 16.04 for this length of time - we were not an official distro back then but enough people contacted us to convince us to continue rather than the usual 9 months Ubuntu distro support cadence.

    With a rolling release mechanism for all thing budgie-desktop - the GUI, applets, budgie-welcome, themes etc, the latest 16.04.4 is very much different from the initial 16.04 release.

  • Ubuntu Budgie Remix 16.04 Operating System Will Reach End of Life in August 2018

    The Ubuntu Budgie development team announced their plans to end security and software updates support for the Budgie Remix 16.04 operating system beginning in August 2018.

    Budgie Remix was the initial name as the Ubuntu Budgie operating system before becoming an official flavor, and its first release was based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), announced in April 2014. Now, four years later, the Budgie Remix 16.04 is reaching end of life and will no longer receive security and software updates starting August 2018.

    "With a heavy heart, the Ubuntu Budgie team today announce the end-of-support for our 16.04 budgie-remix edition from the beginning of August 2018. We would like to thank the almost quarter of a million downloaders since we first launched budgie-remix back in April 2016 for at least having a look at our fledgling distro," reads the announcement.

Debian vs Ubuntu, Debian Linux 7 EoL

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian vs Ubuntu

    Ubuntu and Debian are two of the most popular Linux distributions in history. Aside from that, they're very closely related, making it hard for new Linux users to sort out the differences between the two.

    While, many things may appear to be similar, or even the same, with these powerhouse distributions, there are some sizable differences between them.

  • Debian Linux 7 Long Term Support reached end-of-life

    The Debian Linux version 7 (codenamed “Wheezy”) support ended on 31st May 2018. It was initial release on May 4, 2013. Each LTS ( initial release on May 4, 2013) support lasts for five years. It means Debian project will not provide any security updates for Debian 7. As Debian Linux 7 Long Term support ends, hence you must upgrade your system to keep it secure. This page list all essentials steps to update your system from Debian 7 to Debian 8.

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Red Hat: Interview, Releases, Events, Compliance and Finance

Linux Foundation Expansion and Linux Development

  • Deutsche Telekom signs up as platinum member of Linux Foundation Networking
    Deutsche Telekom has doubled down on its commitment to using open source by signing up as a platinum member of Linux Foundation Networking. Earlier this year, the Linux Foundation put some of its open source communities, including the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), under the Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) brand in order to foster cross-project collaboration. Mainly thanks to ONAP, the LNF projects currently enable close to 70% of all the world's global mobile subscribers.
  • Deutsche Telekom Joins The Linux Foundation, Deepens Investment in Open Source Networking
  • Samsung Galaxy S Support With The Linux 4.19 Kernel
    Just in case you have your hands still on the Samsung Galaxy S or Galaxy S 4G that were released back in 2010 as once high-end Android smartphones, they have DeviceTree support with the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle. The DeviceTree additions are currently staged ahead of the Linux 4.19 kernel for these S5Pv210 Aries based smartphones. With this code in place for Linux 4.19, the Galaxy S should at least see working mainline support for storage, PMIC, RTC, fuel gauge, keys, USB, and WiFi working in order.
  • Using the Best CPU Available on Asymmetric Systems
    This is the type of situation with a patch where it might look like a lack of opposition could let it sail into the kernel tree, but really, it just hasn't been thoroughly examined by Linux bigwigs yet. Once the various contributors have gotten the patch as good as they can get it without deeper feedback, they'll probably send it up the ladder for inclusion in the main source tree. At that point, the security folks will jump all over it, looking for ways that a malicious user might force processes all onto only one particular CPU (essentially mounting a denial-of-service attack) or some such thing. Even if the patch survives that scrutiny, one of the other big-time kernel people, or even Linus Torvalds, could reject the patch on the grounds that it should represent a solution for large-scale systems as well as small. Either way, something like Dietmar and Quentin's patch will be desirable in the kernel, because it's always good to take advantages of the full range of abilities of a system. And nowadays, a lot of devices are coming out with asymmetric CPUs and other quirks that never were part of earlier general-purpose systems. So, there's definitely a lot to be gained in seeing this sort of patch go into the tree.

Games: Risin' Goat, CorsixTH, Hegemone Pass, Unreal Engine

Software: Remote Access, EncryptPad, Aria2 WebUI, Qbs

  • Best Linux remote desktop clients of 2018
    This article has been fully updated, and was provided to TechRadar by Linux Format, the number one magazine to boost your knowledge on Linux, open source developments, distro releases and much more. It appeared in issue 220, published February 2017. Subscribe to the print or digital version of Linux Format here. SSH has been the staple remote access tool for system administrators from day one. Admins use SSH to mount remote directories, backup remote servers, spring-clean remote databases, and even forward X11 connections. The popularity of single-board computers, such as the Raspberry Pi, has introduced SSH into the parlance of everyday desktop users as well. While SSH is useful for securely accessing one-off applications, it’s usually overkill, especially if you aren’t concerned about the network’s security. There are times when you need to remotely access the complete desktop session rather than just a single application. You may want to guide the person on the other end through installing software or want to tweak settings on a Windows machine from the comfort of your Linux desktop yourself.
  • EncryptPad: Encrypted Text Editor For Your Secrets
    EncryptPad is a simple, free and open source text editor that encrypts saved text files and allows protecting them with passwords, key files, or both. It's available on Windows, macOS, and Linux. The application comes with a GUI as well as a command line interface, and it also offers a tool for encrypting and decrypting binary files.
  • Aria2 WebUI: Clean Web Frontend for aria2
    Aria2 WebUI is an open source web frontend for aria2. The software bills itself as the finest interface to interact with aria2. That’s a lofty goal considering the competition from the likes of uGet Download Manager (which offers an aria2 plugin). Aria2 WebUI started as part of the GSOC program 2012. But a lot has changed since the software’s creation under that initiative. While the pace of development has lessened considerably in recent years, the software has not been abandoned.
  • qbs 1.12 released
    We are happy to announce version 1.12.0 of the Qbs build tool. [...] All command descriptions now list the product name to which the generated artifact belongs. This is particularly helpful for larger projects where several products contain files of the same name, or even use the same source file. The vcs module no longer requires a repository to create the header file. If the project is not in a repository, then the VCS_REPO_STATE macro will evaluate to a placeholder string. It is now possible to generate Makefiles from Qbs projects. While it is unlikely that complex Qbs projects are completely representable in the Makefile format, this feature might still be helpful for debugging purposes.