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Ubuntu

Proprietary: ​Opera as Snap on GNU/Linux, Chrome 69 Beta

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Software
Ubuntu
  • Opera launches as a Snap for Linux users

    Opera and Canonical today announce that Opera, the popular web browser, is now available as a Snap in the Snap Store. Opera is the latest notable addition to the Snap Store providing ever more choice to Linux users via an easy to install, always up to date application direct from the software vendor.

    Opera, founded in 1995 in Oslo has been delivering browsers and AI-driven content delivery products to 322 million users worldwide across a range of devices and operating systems. It is responsible for now standardised browser features such as tabs or speed dial. Currently, it is the browser of choice for more demanding users who seek features such as a built-in VPN, ad blocker or a separate messengers sidebar.

  • ​Opera is available in a Snap on Linux

    They've done this by packing Opera into a Snap in the Snap Store. The Opera snap is supported on Debian, Elementary, Fedora, Linux Mint, Manjaro, OpenSUSE, Ubuntu, and other Linux distributions.

    Snaps are containerised software packages. They're designed to work securely within any Linux environment across desktop, the cloud, and IoT devices. Thousands of snaps have been launched since 2016. Users like them because they come with automatic updates and roll-back features.

    Snaps also are a bit more secure than most Linux apps. They make it easier for developers to roll out their programs. When your program in encased in a Snap, you don't need to worry about the distribution's native packaging or whether the desktop distro includes a vital library your application needs.

  • Opera Web Browser Is Now Available as a Snap on Ubuntu, Other Linux Distros

    Canonical and Opera Software informs Softpedia today about the availability of the Chromium-based Opera web browser as a Snap package in the Snap Store for Ubuntu and supported Linux-based operating systems.

    Used by more than 322 million users worldwide on a wide range of devices and computer operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows, Opera is a very popular web browser based on the latest technologies from the open-source Chromium project. On Linux platforms, users can install Opera as DEB and RPM packages.

  • Opera Browser is Now Available in the Ubuntu Snap Store

    It just got a whole lot easier to install the Opera web browser on Ubuntu and other Linux distros. Canonical has announced that the well-known web browser is now available as a Snap app in the Ubuntu Snap store.

  • Chrome 69 Beta: CSS tricks, and more

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 69 on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 69 is beta as of August 2.

  • Chrome 69 Beta Released With AV1 Decode & Various CSS Additions

    Google has rolled out the Chrome 69 beta web-browser update today for Linux, Android, and other supported platforms.

    Chrome 69 Beta is quite exciting in that it introduces initial support for AV1 video decoding support -- albeit still in very early form but now possible thanks to AV1 v1.0 being firmed up. There are also a number of CSS styling enhancements with Chrome 69 Beta including support for conic gradients, new margin/padding/border properties, scroll snap positions, display cutouts, and more.

How to Install and Configure Sound Themes in Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

This beginner’s guide will explain how you can install sound themes in Ubuntu.

If you like to give your desktop different look and feel via various themes, icon themes, then why not sound also. There are plenty of cool sound themes available in Ubuntu covering lots of events. This gives a feel of life in your Ubuntu desktop experience, rather than a ‘silent’ usage. Here’s how you can install sound theme in Ubuntu.

We have chosen “Smooth” sound theme containing 58 system events.

Read more

Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Released as Last in the Series, Download Now

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Ubuntu

Every LTS (Long Term Support) version of the Ubuntu Linux operating system is supported by Canonical with security and software updates for five years on the Ubuntu Desktop, Server, and Cloud images, and they received a total of five point releases every six months or so.

Dubbed Xenial Xerus, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was released on April 21, 2016, with the Unity desktop environment, and it's supported until April 2021. The Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS point release is the last in the series and like all the previous point releases, it represents an up-to-date installation medium for those who want to install a fresh Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system.

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Also: Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS Released For Those Not Yet Upgrading To Ubuntu 18.04

Ubuntu: uCaresystem, Server, and National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC)

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Ubuntu
  • How to keep your Ubuntu Linux systems updated with uCaresystem

    If you're like me, you prefer to keep your Linux systems as up to date as possible. After all, vulnerabilities are patched, new features are added, and a server or desktop can be made to run more smoothly and securely by keeping it as "in the now" as possible. To that end, most users will open up a terminal window and run the tried-and-true sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade command to catch anything available for their system.

    The thing is, those two commands either may not catch everything or they leave behind outdated files that can lead to problems down the road. Of course, you could add to your list of commands the likes of sudo apt-get autoremove and apt-get clean. Wouldn't it be nice if there were a single tool to take care of all that? Oh wait, there is! That tool is called uCareSystem. Let's install and use this one-stop-shop updater.

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 31 July 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • UK cyber security boffins dispense Ubuntu 18.04 wisdom

    The UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has dispensed advice aimed at securing Ubuntu installs and followed it up with help for Dixons customers.

    The NCSC, part of the UK’s Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) exists to make the UK a safer place to do business online and, in an unusual step for a Government agency, does a pretty good job of dispensing sensible security advice.

    Dixons Carphone customers got the treatment yesterday, following the admission that, er, maybe a bit more than 1.2 million users had actually had their privates exposed in a data breach. More like 10 million records. GCHQ's infosec crew suggested Dixons users shouldn't fill in their log-in info via that link on that unsolicited email, hmm?

    Last week, however, it was Ubuntu 18.04 LTS upon which the agency turned its gimlet gaze. The security wonks first stated the obvious – route data over a secure VPN to avoid prying eyes, stop users installing whatever they want and for goodness sake, cut down on the admin rights.

New Login Screen of Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish)

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Ubuntu

A quick look at the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 login screen via Yaru theme.

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), the next major release of Ubuntu operating system which is currently in development. Among all the features, enhancements of Ubuntu 18.10, the main attractive feature is the look-n-feel. With 18.10 release, Ubuntu is bringing change to its default theme with a new theme called ‘Communitheme’ which is recently renamed as Yaru.

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The best way to update and install apps on Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a great Linux distribution that is soon to become even better. Already it's stable, secure, and user-friendly, so what's about to change? Recently I received an interesting question about Ubuntu. The question was about the best way to update and install apps on Ubuntu. That's where one major improvement is about to happen.

The thing that needs to be considered, for Ubuntu, is that they are migrating over to GNOME in 17.10, which means the now-defunct Ubuntu Software Center is officially switching to GNOME Software. This is a good thing on so many levels. First off, the Ubuntu Software Center has been broken for a long time. Also, with the old system, you had to install software from one tool and upgrade software from another. Now, thanks to the new GNOME Software tool, everything happens in one happy location.

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Xubuntu Development Update August 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

This is the final point release for Xubuntu 16.04 “Xenial Xerus”. As Xubuntu has a 3-year support cycle, this release will be supported until April 2019. There have not been any major changes from the Xubuntu team for this point release, but there have been a number of other improvements and security updates for other components.

16.04.5 is expected to be released tomorrow, August 2, 2018. If you have a few moments, feel free to do some testing and make sure everything is working as well as we think it is!

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Also: Snapcraft Build Environments

Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS Release Candidate Ready for Testing Ahead of August 2 Release

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Lukasz Zemczak put out a call for testing today for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series.

Release Candidate (RC) images of the Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS point release, which is the fifth and also the last for the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, are now ready for public testing. The Ubuntu community is urged to download and test drive the new RC images in case some unknown issues arise.

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Original: First set of 16.04.5 RC images ready for testing

Here's the New Login Screen of Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) with Yaru Theme

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Ubuntu

One of the most attractive things about the forthcoming Ubuntu 18.10 operating system, due for release later this fall on October 18, 2018, is its new look and feel, which is provided by the so-called Communitheme that was recently renamed as Yaru, a system-wide theme for Ubuntu Desktop.

As part of this community initiative, Ubuntu 18.10 will get a brand-new look and feel that will make the popular computer operating system more modern, more accessible, and more attractive. And, today we finally have a first look at the Yaru theme on the current Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) development release.

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UK's National Cyber Security Centre Give Advice on Securing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Dubbed Bionic Beaver, the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system was launched in April 2018 as the latest release of Canonical's popular Ubuntu Linux OS, and it's a long-term support release that will receive security and software updates for the next five years, until April 2023. The Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS point release is also available for download and includes all the latest security updates.

Being based on the Linux kernel, Ubuntu is already a secure computer operating system compared to Windows or macOS, but if you're living in the UK (United Kingdom) and you need to configure your Ubuntu 18.04 LTS installations for maximum security, the National Cyber Security Centre tells you how.

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today's leftovers

  • Opus 1.3 Codec Library Nears, New Tools Release
    Back in June was the first release candidate of Opus 1.3 (libopus v1.3) with this open-source audio codec allowing to use SILK down to bitrates of about 5kb/s, wideband encoding down to 9kb/s, improved security, improved Ambisonics support, and much more. Libopus 1.3 RC2 is now available along with some tooling updates. Libopus 1.3 RC2 was released on Tuesday to fix issues with bandwidth detection, enable Ambisonics support by default, and enables security hardening by default.
  • Akademy 2018
    I had the awesome opportunity to attend Akademy in Vienna this year. First off, a big thank you to the organising team for pulling off this years Akademy without a hitch. This Akademy was a bit more special, since it was decided to switch up the format, which in my opinion worked quite well. There were training’s that ran alongside the talk’s and BoF’s, which I think was a great idea. I signed up to the Public Speaking Training and the Non Violent Communication training, which I think were run exceptionally. I hope that these training sessions are run again next Akademy because I found them exceptionally valuable.
  • NetworkManager Merges An Initrd Generator For Early Boot Handling
    Days following the NetworkManager 1.14 release, feature activity on the next release is progressing and the newest addition is nm-initrd-generator. The NetworkManager Initrd Generator is used to generate an early-boot NetworkManager configuration. This new utility scans the command line for supported options and from there generates a network configuration and the necessary configuration files to handle an early instance of NetworkManager that runs from the initial ramdisk during the system's early boot stage.
  • Mageia at fête de l’humanité 2018
    The booths were in a different place from previous years, and we had a lot more visitors. We gave out all the flyers we brought by Saturday evening – there was only one left for Sunday – so we gave out Mageia stickers instead. We did not sell any T-shirts, but we sold two USB sticks. Many people asked for general information; I spoke so much that I lost my voice! We had strong interest, coming from people already using a Linux distribution as well as from people wishing to turn to free software.
  • Troubleshooting FDB table wrapping in Open vSwitch
    When most people deploy an Open vSwitch configuration for virtual networking using the NORMAL rule, that is, using L2 learning, they do not think about configuring the size of the Forwarding DataBase (FDB).
  • Test Day: Fedora Silverblue
    Fedora Silverblue is a new variant of Fedora Workstation with rpm-ostree at its core to provide fully atomic upgrades. Furthermore, Fedora Silverblue is immutable and upgrades as a whole, providing easy rollbacks from updates if something goes wrong. Fedora Silverblue is great for developers using Fedora with good support for container-focused workflows. Additionally, Fedora Silverblue delivers desktop applications as Flatpaks. This provides better isolation/sandboxing of applications, and streamlines updating applications — Flatpaks can be safely updated without reboot.
  • Understand Fedora memory usage with top
    Have you used the top utility in a terminal to see memory usage on your Fedora system? If so, you might be surprised to see some of the numbers there. It might look like a lot more memory is consumed than your system has available. This article will explain a little more about memory usage, and how to read these numbers. [...] Your system has another facility it uses to store information, which is swap. Typically this is an area of slower storage (like a hard disk). If the physical memory on the system fills up as needs increase, the OS looks for portions of memory that haven’t been needed in a while. It writes them out to the swap area, where they sit until needed later. Therefore, prolonged, high swap usage usually means a system is suffering from too little memory for its demands. Sometimes an errant application may be at fault. Or, if you see this often on your system, consider upgrading your machine’s memory, or restricting what you run.
  • Global Open-Source Learning Management Systems Software Market Size, Status and Forecast 2022
  • The Commons Clause vs. Open Source controversy, explained [iophk: "if it has the "Commons Clause" in it then it does not qualify as Open Source"]

    So, what is Commons Clause and why isn’t it the same thing as open source?

Endless OS May Be the Best Linux Version for New Computer Users

Linux appeals to a certain kind of computer user: if you like computers enough to read about or tinker with them in your free time, then there’s a good chance you’ll find something to like about Linux. Otherwise, you will probably consider it too much work to bother. Endless Computer’s Endless OS aims to provide a complete desktop experience that’s versatile enough to serve families. Is this the ideal way to introduce newcomers to Linux? Read more

today's howtos

Andrew Crouthamel: How I Got Involved in KDE

Since this blog is starting after the beginning of my contributions to KDE, the first few regular posts will be explaining my prior contributions, before moving into the present. Read more