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Canonical Apologizes for Boot Failure in Ubuntu 18.10 & 18.04, Fix Available Now

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Ubuntu

Canonical released a new kernel update for Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) and Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS (Bionic Beaver) systems to address a regression introduces by the last kernel security patch.
After patching a nasty Linux kernel regression in the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system series, Canonical now addressed another regression affecting the Linux 4.18 kernel packages of Ubuntu 18.10 and Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS systems, which was introduced by an important kernel security update released earlier this week.

The kernel security update that Canonical published on February 4th was available for Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 16.0.4 LTS, and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS systems, but only Ubuntu 18.10 machines were affected by a regression that could prevent them from booting when certain graphics chipsets are used.

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Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Delayed for Valentine's Day Due to Boot Error

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Ubuntu

Canonical announced today that the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system would be delayed for a week, until February 14th, due to a boot error that cannot be fixed in time.

In a mailing list announcement published earlier today, Canonical's Adam Conrad announced that Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS would be released next week, on Valentine's Day, February 14th, instead of the initial February 7th launch. The cause for the delay appears to be a critical boot error with the Linux 4.18 kernel.

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Also: What’s the OOPS ID?

Ubuntu Preloaded by Zotac and Debian Development Reports

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Zotac launches its first five embedded mini-PCs — with Ubuntu

    Zotac unveiled a line of Linux-ready, embedded “ZBox Pro” mini-PCs. The fanless systems include an Apollo Lake based “Pico” ultra-mini-PC plus Braswell and Apollo Lake based “Nano” and Kaby Lake based “QK” models.

    Consumer mini-PC maker Zotac has announced its first line of embedded mini-PCs and the first available with pre-loaded Linux. The Intel-based ZBox Pro series computers are aimed more at light embedded duty such as digital signage than industrial work, and they offer processors and I/O that are very similar to Zotac’s consumer media, desktop replacement, and gaming designs. However, they offer more durable, aluminum cases with extended -20 to 40⁰ to 45⁰ support, depending on the model. They also provide “more controlled tolerances” than Zotac’s consumer mini-PCs, and they offer 5-year longevity support.

  • Debian build helpers: dh dominates

    It's been a while since someone did this. Back in 2009, Joey Hess made a talk at Debconf 9 about debhelper and mentioned in his slides (PDF) that it was used in most Debian packages.

  • Molly de Blanc: Free software activities (January, 2019)

    January was another quiet month for free software. This isn’t to say I wasn’t busy, but merely that there were fewer things going on, with those things being more demanding of my attention. I’m including some more banal activities both to pad out the list, but to also draw some attention to the labor that goes into free software participation.

Safer Way to Run Bleeding Edge Software on Debian and Ubuntu

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Debian
Ubuntu

You may have noticed that some software in your distribution is not the latest available. Most people are not even aware of this because, often, it’s not an issue. It’s only when you need some very recent features when it becomes an issue. Let’s say your favorite video editor had some code changes that improve rendering time by 20%. That may be something you want.

Long story short, most distributions that are considered “stable” or “long term support” will have (at least partially) older software in their repositories. But “rolling distros” have much newer software included, as they constantly pull in updates from upstream developers. Debian Unstable (codenamed Sid) is such a distribution. With some command-line magic, you can run Debain Sid inside your current installation of Debian Stable or Ubuntu.

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Also: Fresh snaps from January 2019

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) Reaches End of Life on April 30, 2019

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Ubuntu

Canonical today reminded Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) users that it would make its commercial Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) offering available series starting May 2019.

Released on April 17, 2014, the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series will reach its end of life in about three months from the moment of writing, on April 30, 2019. Ubuntu 14.04 was an LTS (Long Term Support) release, which means that it received software and security updates for five years.

Last year on September 19, Canonical informed Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) users that they would be able to purchase additional support for the operating system through its commercial offering called Extended Security Maintenance (ESM), which proved to be a huge success among Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) users.

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Canonical Releases Important Ubuntu Linux Kernel Security Patches, Update Now

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Security
Ubuntu

Available for the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series, the new Linux kernel updates address a total of 12 security issues, one affecting both Ubuntu 18.10 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, three affecting Ubuntu 18.10, four affecting Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and other four affecting Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

For Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), the new kernel patch fixes a race condition (CVE-2018-14625) discovered in Linux kernel's vsock address family implementation, a use-after-free vulnerability (CVE-2018-16882) in the KVM implementation, as well as two other flaws found in the crypto subsystem and KVM implementation (CVE-2018-19407 and CVE-2018-19854).

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Ubuntu and Debian: ZFS Desktop Support, Weekly Newsletter, LXD For Linux Containers, Ubuntu Core and Raspberry Pi, Debian Buster on the Raspberry Pi 3

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu's Work On New Desktop Installer Continues, Evaluating ZFS Desktop Support

    A few things in Ubuntu's latest weekly development summary caught our attention... As has been going on for months, a new Ubuntu installer "Ubiquity-NG" continues to be worked on, but seemingly tying into that they are looking at ZFS support on the desktop. 

    Public details are light, but it looks like Canonical is evaluating the means of better supporting ZFS on the desktop. ZoL packages are available for all Ubuntu editions right now, but not any nice/easy-to-use desktop installer integration at the moment. 

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 564
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 564
  • LXD For Linux Containers Had A Very Fruitful 2018

    While Canonical often takes heat for their various project "forks", their work on LXD for further innovating atop LXC for Linux containers has really paid off. Over the past few years LXD has really evolved into quite a capable system container manager beast. 

    Stéphane Graber of Canonical talked at FOSDEM in Brussels yesterday about LXD over 2018 and its many accomplishments. The biggest achievement for this project that continues to be led by Canonical is that LXD now ships on all Chromebooks as part of its container support for running Linux applications.

  • Easy IoT with Ubuntu Core and Raspberry Pi

    My current job involves me mostly working in the upper layers of the desktop software stack however I started out working in what was then called embedded engineering but now would probably be know as the Internet of Things (IoT). I worked on a number of projects which normally involved taking some industrial equipment (radio infrastructure, camera control system) and adding a stripped down Linux kernel and an application.

  • Debian buster on the Raspberry Pi 3 (update) [Ed: Updated Monday]
  • Looking for a new Raspberry Pi image maintainer

Easy IoT with Ubuntu Core and Raspberry Pi

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Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos

My current job involves me mostly working in the upper layers of the desktop software stack however I started out working in what was then called embedded engineering but now would probably be know as the Internet of Things (IoT). I worked on a number of projects which normally involved taking some industrial equipment (radio infrastructure, camera control system) and adding a stripped down Linux kernel and an application.

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Security and Patches

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LibO
Security
Ubuntu
  • Recently patched Ubuntu needs another quick patch

    Sometimes when I fix things around my house I end up causing more problems. Software developers are the same way. Last week, Canonical's Ubuntu developers fixed over 10 security bugs in Ubuntu 18.04… But, as it turned out, it introduced at least two other bugs.

  • LibreOffice patches malicious code-execution bug, Apache OpenOffice – wait for it, wait for it – doesn't

    A security flaw affecting LibreOffice and Apache OpenOffice has been fixed in one of the two open-source office suites. The other still appears to be vulnerable.

    Before attempting to guess which app has yet to be patched, consider that Apache OpenOffice for years has struggled attract more contributors. And though the number of people adding code to the project has grown since last we checked, the project missed its recent January report to the Apache Foundation. The upshot is: security holes aren't being patched, it seems.

Canonical Patches Linux Kernel Regression in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Update Now

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Linux
Ubuntu

On January 27th, Canonical released a major kernel security update for the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, addressing no less than eleven vulnerabilities, seven of which affected the EXT4 file system implementation within the Linux kernel. The flaws affected Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and its derivatives.

At that moment in time, users were urged to update their Ubuntu 18.04 LTS systems to the linux-image 4.15.0-44.47 kernel if they used Linux kernel 4.15, as well as to linux-image 4.18.0-14.15~18.04.1 if they used the Linux 4.18 kernel series. However, it would appear that the Linux 4.15 kernel update introduced an unwanted regression.

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Availability of GNOME 3.32 on GNU/Linux Distros

Following my Plasma 5.15 distros list, this is a list of GNOME 3.32 distros which are available as installation LiveCD. GNOME 3.32 has been released recently at 13 March 2019 and rapidly being made available into several GNU/Linux distros for desktop, either within the ISO or in the repository. At this moment, you can download any of Ubuntu 19.04 and Fedora Rawhide (for installable LiveCD), followed by openSUSE Tumbleweed, Debian Experimental, Manjaro GNOME, and Mageia 7 (by manually upgrading from respective repositories) in order to quickly test GNOME 3.32. However, please note that this is based on today's data and can be changed rapidly over time. I wish this list helps you. Go ahead, happy downloading, happy testing! Read more

today's howtos

RaspEX Project Brings Kodi 18.1 and Linux Kernel 5.0 to Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Based on Debian GNU/Linux and Raspberry Pi's Raspbian operating systems, RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 is now available with the latest Kodi 18.1 "Leia" media center software featuring add-ons for watching Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, and Plex, as well as the lightweight LXDE desktop environment with VLC media player and NetworkManager. RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 is also powered by the latest and greatest Linux 5.0 kernel series, which apparently works very well with the recently launched Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ single-board computer. However, while Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is recommended for RaspEX, you can also install it on a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B or the older Raspberry Pi 2 Model B. Read more