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Ubuntu

Compact, rugged box computer runs Ubuntu on Jetson TX2

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Ubuntu

Axiomtek’s “eBOX560-900-FL” fanless AI computer runs Ubuntu 16.04 on Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 module, and adds 2x GbE ports and single USB, HDMI 2.0, mini-PCIe, and M.2 with optional NVM. The fanless system offers IP40 protection, vibration resistance, and -10 to 50°C support.

There have been a lot of carrier boards designed for Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 module, but the eBOX560-900-FL is the first complete Jetson TX2-based embedded computer we’ve covered. Axiomtek’s compact, rugged box computer, which follows earlier Ebox products such as the Intel Haswell based eBOX560-880-FL, is designed for AI computing, machine vision, deep learning, and edge computing.

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Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS Amazon Linux AMIs Now Support Amazon's SSM Agent

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Ubuntu

As of July 2018, Amazon's Linux AMIs (Amazon Machine Images) that are based on either the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) or Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating systems now come pre-installed with the AWS Systems Manager Agent (SSM Agent), an Amazon software designed to run on hybrid or Amazon EC2 instances in public and private clouds on AWS (Amazon Web Services).

"With this new feature release, AWS Systems Manager Agent is installed by default on all instances launched or built from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (2018.07 and later) and 18.04 LTS (all versions) AMIs," said Amazon. "By having the agent pre-installed, you can quickly start using AWS Systems Manager features such as Run Command, State Manager, Inventory and Patch Manager."

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Comparing Latencies and Power consumption with various CPU schedulers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

The low-latency kernel offering with Ubuntu provides a kernel tuned for low-latency environments using low-latency kernel configuration options. The x86 kernels by default run with the Intel-Pstate CPU scheduler set to run with the powersave scaling governor biased towards power efficiency.

While power efficiency is fine for most use-cases, it can introduce latencies due to the fact that the CPU can be running at a low frequency to save power and also switching from a deep C state when idle to a higher C state when servicing an event can also increase on latencies.

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Ubuntu MATE - Pimp your desktop to perfection

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE has made a quantum leap of innovation in the past several months, offering a wealth of visual and functional changes and a mindblowing level of flexibility when it comes to customization. You really have the ability to implement anything and everything, and all of it natively, from within the system's interface. The list of options is so long that it can be overwhelming.

Hopefully, this little pimping guide puts some order into this fine and rich chaos. Ubuntu Bionic isn't the most refined distro, but it sure has the almost infinite possibilities to make it appear and behave how you want it. You can have a classic desktop one day and then a MAC-like thing the next and then Ubuntu Unity the day after that. It's all there, very slick, very elegant. Well, it's time for you to do some exploring. See you.

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Lubuntu 18.04 Review: Stable and Dependable As Always

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Reviews
Ubuntu

I stated earlier that 18.04 looks pretty much the same compared to when I first installed it. This is not a bad thing. Lubuntu is not designed to be flashy or to have the latest cutting-edge features. It is designed to use few resources and run well on a wide variety of computers. It does that very well. You could set anyone who ever used Windows in front of a Lubuntu box and they would be good to go. I would certainly recommend it for beginners and older computers

One thing that was confusing when I was researching this article was the existence of more than one site for Lubuntu. When I searched for Lubuntu, one of the first search result entries was for lubuntu.net. I thought it was the project’s official website. Then, I was surfing through Lubuntu’s Wikipedia entry. It listed lubuntu.me as the official site. Both look very official. It’s only after you dig that you discover that lubuntu.net was created by “Free and Open Source contributors from Asia, Linux Fans and the Lubuntu Meilix community”. It’s essentially a fan site. They had better let people know that they are not the official site before they get in trouble with someone.

Have you ever used Lubuntu? What is your favorite Ubuntu flavor? Please let us know in the comments below.

If you found this article interesting, please take a minute to share it on social media.

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Xbox 360 Wireless Controller for PC+Rocket League+Ubuntu=Awesome

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Gaming
Ubuntu
HowTos

I’m a gamer. I’ve been playing PC games since DOS, and have no plan to ever stop, thankfully there are an increasing number of wicked games available on GNU/Linux systems, like Rocket League for example.

If you’ve been living under a rock for the past few years, and have no idea what Rocket League is, it’s basically Soccer/Football (other game modes have other sports, etc, but the primary focus is as mentioned) in super high powered, jet propulsed cars; it’s awesome. However, Rocket League is not very easily played via keyboard, and having some kind of controller is essential.

I use an Xbox 360 Wireless Controller as my primary controller when playing games that support one on Linux.

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Find Snap Apps Faster Using This Online Store

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Ubuntu

When you want to find or install a Snap app you’re supposed to head to Ubuntu Software, which is part of the default Ubuntu desktop.

But if I’m being honest Ubuntu Software sucks. It’s slow. The layout isn’t great for discovery. And Ubuntu’s instance on listing (often irrelevant) Snap apps at the top of any and all search results muddies its use as a competent cross-format app hub.

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Empowering Linux Developers for the New Wave of Innovation

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Ubuntu

Machine learning and IoT in particular offer huge opportunities for developers, especially those facing the crowded markets of other platforms, to engage with a sizeable untapped audience.

That Linux is open source makes it an amazing breeding ground for innovation. Developers aren’t constrained by closed ecosystems, meaning that Linux has long been the operating system of choice for developers. So by engaging with Linux, businesses can attract the best available developer skills.

The Linux ecosystem has always strived for a high degree of quality. Historically it was the Linux community taking sole responsibility for packaging software, gating each application update with careful review to ensure it worked as advertised on each distribution of Linux. This proved difficult for all sides.

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A look at Ubuntu 18.04 Budgie

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Reviews
Ubuntu

I like this. I like this a lot. It’s exactly what I’d been hoping it would be, after the previous failures at a happy Budgie desktop. I haven’t used it for long enough to get as deep into messing with it as I probably will in the future, so maybe I’ll find issues at that time; but Ubuntu 18.04 Budgie is seeming to be a quite solid, attractive, and easy to use system for people who want even more eyecandy, or are sick of the usual environments.

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Ubuntu: Demystifying Snap Confinement, 'Minimal', “Ubuntu Is Everywhere”, and Ubuntu Podcast

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Ubuntu
  • Demystifying Snap Confinement

    Snaps introduce some new concepts to the Linux ecosystem which developers can take advantage of, and snap users need to appreciate. When installing a snap, it’s important to understand what parts of the system the application wants access to. It’s up to the user to decide to install (or not) a snap, and the confinement model empowers the user in the decision making process.

  • Canonical releases Minimal Ubuntu for servers, containers and the cloud

    There's a new version of Ubuntu on the block -- Ubuntu Minimal. It's been stripped right back to the bone to leave a tiny footprint, and these back Linux distros should boot 40 percent faster than a standard Ubuntu server image. Despite the reduced footprint size, Ubuntu Minimal retains all of Ubuntu's standard tools (such as ssh, apt and snapd) and maintain full compatibility.

    Designed for cloud developers and ops, Canonical says that the release is intended for completely automated operations, and as such much of the user-friendliness has been stripped out, but it's still ideal for used in KVM, Google Computer Engine and AWS.

  • This Infographic From Canonical Shows “Ubuntu Is Everywhere”

    Microsoft Windows owns the lion’s share in the operating system market, but at the same time, we cannot deny the presence of Linux. The fact that Linux Ubuntu powers Netflix, Snapchat, Dropbox, Uber, Tesla, and International Space Station is enough to prove the might of the opensource kernel.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E18 – Eighteen Summers - Ubuntu Podcast
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New Devices With Defective Intel Chips and Linux Support

  • Linux-friendly embedded computer runs on Apollo Lake power
    Axiomtek has released a rugged, Ubuntu-ready “eBOX627-312-FL” embedded PC with a dual-core Celeron N3350, 2x GbE, 6x USB, and 4x serial ports plus mini-PCIe, HDMI, SATA, and “Flexible I/O.”
  • EPIC board boasts 4x GbE ports and PCIe x4
    Aaeon is rolling out a new EPIC form-factor “EPIC-KBS9” SBC with 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series chips, 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR3, and mini-PCIe and PCIe x4 expansion. Aaeon’s EPIC-KBS9 follows two other EPIC-KBS SBCs to support Intel’s 6th “Skylake” or 7th “Kaby Lake” generation S-Series processors: the EPIC-KBS7, which emphasized real-world ports, and last month’s EPIC-KBS8, which is a bit more feature rich but with fewer coastline ports. Unlike these earlier models, the KBS9 offers 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR4-2133, and a full-size PCIe x4 slot, which supports NVMe storage.

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