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Ubuntu: Tennibot, Desktop Plans for 18.10, Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

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Ubuntu
  • Creating the world’s first robotic tennis ball collector with Ubuntu

    Why else did the Tennibot team turn to Ubuntu originally? “We needed something that was both light and compatible with libraries and existing software. Given the geographical spread of where the Tennibot would end up, our final choice needed to have remote upgrading capability too. And of course, both for ourselves plus our users who are not tech savvy, it needed to be solidly tested and stable” said Lincoln Wang, CTO at Tennibot.

    Haitham Eletrabi, CEO of Tennibot adds, “The compatibility with software like ROS and OpenCV makes the implementation and testing of Tennibot’s algorithms an easy task. The support from the Ubuntu community also simplifies debugging the device’s software. In addition, Ubuntu is so versatile with different sensors and components that it really makes it the more superior option for us.”

  • Desktop plans for 18.10

    Bionic is out the door and we’ve started the Cosmic cycle so I wanted to take this opportunity to tell you about our plans for this cycle, the sorts of features we want to work on and what you can expect from 18.10 when it arrives in October.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E11 – Station Eleven - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we reconstruct a bathroom and join the wireless gaming revolution. We discuss the Steam Link app for Android and iOS, the accessible Microsoft Xbox controller, Linux applications coming to ChromeOS and round up the community news.

Kubuntu Devs to Focus More on Supporting ARM Laptops & Raspberry Pi Than 32-Bit

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KDE
Ubuntu

Earlier this month, the Kubuntu developers have confirmed to us that they won't support new 32-bit installations with the upcoming Kubuntu 18.10 release, and now they made it official.

Developer Valorie Zimmerman posted a message on the Kubuntu-devel mailing list a couple of days ago to officially announce that Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is the last Kubuntu release to offer 32-bit ISO images, as starting with Kubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) they won't be supporting new 32-bit installations.

As already widely reported, the removal of the 32-bit install media revolution has begun amongst official Ubuntu flavors. The first to take the big step was Ubuntu MATE, followed closely by Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Studio, and Ubuntu Kylin. After an official proposal from developer Bryan Quigley, Xubuntu and Kubuntu followed too.

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Ubuntu 18.10 Features: New Theme, Android Integration, Better Power Consumption

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Ubuntu

As you can imagine, Ubuntu 18.10 will come with a lot of new features and improvements, some of which Canonical planned for a long time but didn't manage to implement them in the recently released Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system due to its long-term support status and the focus on stability and reliability.

So, like any other 9-month supported release, Ubuntu 18.10 will be a testbed for Canonical to try new things. Some of these include the ability to unlock your Ubuntu desktop with a fingerprint reader, integration with the KDE Connect Android app by default through GS Connect, a new installer, and a new system theme.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.10 Aims To Lower Power Use, Default To New Desktop Theme

Zenkit Is Now Available as a Snap for Ubuntu and Other GNU/Linux Distributions

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Ubuntu

Promising to offer Linux users one of the most innovative, all-in-one and web-based project management solutions, Zenkit made a Snap universal app to help Linux users install Zenkit on their favorite GNU/Linux distributions. Created by Canonical, Snaps can be installed on Ubuntu, Debian GNU/Linux, Fedora, Arch Linux, Gentoo Linux, OpenSuSE, Linux Mint, Solus, and other popular distros.

"We are delighted to see Zenkit bring their project management solution to the snap ecosystem and place the same importance on Linux users as those of other operating systems. We see an increasingly varied amount of snaps in the store, Zenkit being the latest productivity example, and therefore widening the apps available for Linux users to choose from," says Jamie Bennett, VP of Engineering, IoT and Devices at Canonical.

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Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Review: The Perfect Blend of Ubuntu and Budgie Desktop

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Solus Linux is loved for many reasons. Its flagship desktop environment Budgie, in my opinion, is the biggest reason to love Solus. While there was no shortage of desktop environments in the Linux domain, the arrival and the acceptance of Budgie desktop environment by a widespread audience, clearly showed that there was a huge scope (or even a need?) for a modern, intuitive and non-intrusive desktop environment.

But all is not well in Solus land. Solus unlike a majority of Linux distros is not based on any other parent distro. Solus is written from scratch and has it’s own package management system and software repository. I loved Solus 3. But as an ardent Linux user, I need the latest packages and support from newer software, which, at the moment is not that good on Solus. The software repository is not as vast as that of Ubuntu. Also, the package manager itself needs to evolve.

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Canonical Says There's No Rules Against Mining Cryptocurrencies through Snaps

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Ubuntu

Last week, users discovered that two of the snap packages uploaded by user Nicolas Tomb in the Snap Store, namely 2048buntu and Hextris, mined cryptocurrency in the background while the applications were running without user's knowledge. Canonical immediately removed the apps from its Snap Store.

Now, the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system is addressing the issue saying it has no rules against mining cryptocurrencies through snap apps if the developer informs users about this. As Nicolas Tomb didn't inform users that his apps are mining for cryptocurrencies, the apps were removed.

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Also: Canonical finally comments on Ubuntu Linux Snap Store security failure

Ubuntu News: Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu Make, Weekly Newsletter Issue 527

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Ubuntu

Kali Linux vs Ubuntu – Which Distro is Better for Hacking?

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Development
Ubuntu

Kali Linux is the most popular penetration testing and hacking Linux distroibution and Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution. Since it is kind of common knowledge that Linux is a more convenient OS to use for hacking than Windows, the next question is a no-brainer; which Linux distro is the best to use for hacking?

But what is hacking anyway? And why does it matter which distribution is being used? Let’s get to it.

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Ubuntu Studio 18.10 To Offer A KDE Plasma Desktop Option

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KDE
Ubuntu

The multimedia-focused Ubuntu Studio Linux distribution has used GNOME since its inception and while that is continuing for now, a sign of a possible shift is coming with Ubuntu Studio 18.10 to offer a KDE Plasma desktop option.

For this next Ubuntu Studio release, the GNOME Shell desktop will be their default environment but they are going to offer a KDE Plasma option -- the first time they have offered an alternate desktop option. They would like to make it an option to select at install-time what desktop is preferred by the user, but due to size/packaging constraints, they may end up offering two separate ISOs.

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Direct/source: Plans for Ubuntu Studio 18.10 – Cosmic Cuttlefish

Pinguy OS 18.04 Beta2

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Ubuntu

I have added Unetbootin and Stacer to the new build.

Unetbootin does work but picking files does not. You have to set the path to the ISO manually.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.10 Planning For GS Connect, Allowing Phone Integration With The Desktop

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Games: Riot Games, Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, Dead Cells

  • Riot Games' anti-cheat software for League also targets Linux users
    This week Riot Games implemented a new anti-cheat software for the game that is meant to limit the number of players who use third-party programs while playing. Most of these programs help users cheat in-game, such as by inputting movement commands for a player to allow them to dodge enemy skillshots. Unfortunately for players who run Linux as their operating system, the new anti-cheat also targets it as a third-party program, preventing them from playing League. Many players took to Reddit and other forums to protest the change, even creating a petition for Riot to add Linux compatibility.
  • Riot Games New Anti-Cheat Could Wipe Out League of Legends Linux Player Base
    ​Riot Games has been working on a new anti-cheat system for League of Legends. There are reports that this update would make the game unplayable for Linux users, because it would make the game incompatible with virtual environments, something Linux users have to employ to play the game.
  • A small but nice update on Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Linux support
    We've been waiting quite a while for any real news on the Linux port of Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [Official Site]. While we still don't know when, we do know it's still happening.
  • Dead Cells, a 'RogueVania' now has a Beta available for Linux
    Dead Cells mixes in elements of a Rogue-lite with a MetroidVania to create an interesting mix and it's now available on Linux with a Beta. I did notice in the comments of the previous article, that people were debating the choice of article title. I said it was a "rogue-lite metroidvania action-platformer", which was obviously a bit wrong. They've actually coined their own term for it, calling it a "RogueVania".

"Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp."

  • Mixed Reaction
  • After Github purchase, Microsoft remains a relatively untrusted open source player to some
  • What is GitHub?
    GitHub is now the de facto home of open-source software. But Microsoft’s acquisition reignited a debate over the platform’s centrality. Microsoft assures users the service is safe under its stewardship, but many are wary. When Mr Ballmer spoke of developers, he had a specific sort in mind: those using Microsoft’s tools to build projects for Microsoft products. He once called open-source Linux a “cancer”, which would spread uncontrollably. In a sense, his words proved prophetic: today, open-source software is everywhere, from websites to financial markets to self-driving cars. Under Mr Nadella’s leadership, Microsoft has embraced open-source development. In buying GitHub it hopes to gain the trust of developers it once spurned. But some wonder if the change is complete, or if Microsoft will use its newly bought dominance of open-source hosting to push its own products. Alternatives to GitHub—some themselves open-source—wait in the wings. If it is not careful, Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp.

Making Free Software Suffer Using New Laws

  • Free software is at risk in the EU -- take action now
    Members of the European Parliament want to turn upload platforms like GitLab into "censorship machines" that require user-uploaded materials to be monitored and automatically filtered, a process which would prevent modified and reused code from being uploaded. This provision is covered under Article 13 of the Copyright Directive. If Article 13, embedded within the proposal, becomes official policy, it will be impossible for developers to build off of one another's code -- which is not only a blow to the collaborative development of free software, but a push against the basic freedoms of free software. Software isn't free unless it can be modified and shared. Article 13 will affect all users of free software -- as development of free software suffers, the quality and availability of updates, new features, and new programs will also suffer.
  • Open Source Industry Australia Says Zombie TPP Could Destroy Free Software Licensing
    Without the ability to enforce compliance through the use of injunctions, open source licenses would once again be pointless. Although the OSIA is concerned about free software in Australia, the same logic would apply to any TPP-11 country. It would also impact other nations that joined the Pacific pact later, as the UK is considering (the UK government seems not to have heard of the gravity theory for trade). It would presumably apply to the US if it did indeed rejoin the pact, as has been mooted. In other words, the impact of this section on open source globally could be significant. It's worth remembering why this particular article is present in TPP. It grew out of concerns that nations like China and Russia were demanding access to source code as a pre-requisite of allowing Western software companies to operate in their countries. Article 14.17 was designed as a bulwark against such demands. It's unlikely that it was intended to destroy open source licensing too, although some spotted early on that this was a risk. And doubtless a few big software companies will be only too happy to see free software undermined in this way. Unfortunately, it's probably too much to hope that the Australian Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence & Trade will care about or even understand this subtle software licensing issue. The fate of free software in Australia will therefore depend on whether TPP-11 comes into force, and if so, what judges think Article 14.17 means.

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