Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Ubuntu: Ubuntu 17.10 Review, Ubuntu Core, Security and MAAS

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Review

    Ubuntu 17.10: Unity is gone and gnome shell is in as the default desktop. But how does it function? What about the Linux software and how does it stack up against competing Linux OS? Will Unity users be happy? In this review, I take a look at Ubuntu 17.10 and try to answer those questions.

  • Thinger.io uses Ubuntu Core & snaps for easy IoT deployment

    Thinger.io is a Spanish start up founded in 2015 who aim to enable any developer or organisation to develop IoT applications across a range of sectors, with examples including smart cities, Industry 4.0 and energy monitoring. Thinger.io has already grown to have 10,000 registered users of their platform but with such growing demand, they needed a quicker way to deliver their systems and applications. With a philosophy of using flexible and open technologies, Thinger.io discovered snaps as their ideal solution. Using Snapcraft.io for building snaps has decreased their development time dramatically and streamlined the time taken to release new packages.

  • [Ubuntu] Security Team Weekly Summary: October 26, 2017
  • MAAS Development Update – October 25th

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" Might Launch with Linux Kernel 4.15, GNOME 3.28

Filed under
Ubuntu

Earlier this week, Canonical's Mark Shuttleworth named the next major release of the Ubuntu Linux operating system as "Bionic Beaver," and now the Ubuntu Kernel team shares some insights of what will be the default Linux kernel of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

Read more

Ubuntu and Linux Mint

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Codename and Release Date are Out Now!

    This is not surprising considering the logic behind the codename and versioning of Ubuntu releases. All Ubuntu releases are codenamed with two words, both starting with the same letter. The first word of the codename is an adjective and the second word is usually an endangered species and sometimes mythical characters. The release codenames are in incremental order as well.

  • What The Press Is Saying About Ubuntu 17.10
  • Rumble in the (open) jungle, Ubuntu 17.10

    Canonical has announced the release of the Ubuntu 17.10 operating system featuring a new GNOME desktop on Wayland and new versions of KDE, MATE and Budgie to suit a range of tastes.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 is Adding “Full Support” For Flatpak

    Linux Mint 18.3 will have "full support" for Flatpak, the 'next-gen' app distribution format for Linux, the project has announced in its latest monthly newsletter.

  • Buh-bye! Linux Mint finally kills its pointless KDE Edition

    Linux Mint is a fine Ubuntu-based operating system, although I am not sure it needs to exist anymore. After all, its popularity is largely thanks to the historic disdain for Canonical's Unity desktop environment. With the Unity DE now dead, fewer people will seek out the alternative that is Mint.

    While both the Cinnamon and Mate versions of Linux Mint are decent choices for computer users, there was one version that was always utterly bizarre -- the KDE Edition. Don't get me wrong, KDE is a fine environment, but Kubuntu already exists. Having a version of Mint using KDE was redundant and confusing. Thankfully, today, the Linux Mint team announces it is finally killing the KDE edition.

Ubuntu: Shuttleworth Speaks Out, Ubuntu 17.10 Plans, Xubuntu 18.04 Plans

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Shuttleworth explains killing off Unity

    Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth has been telling the world+dog why he killed off Unity and it is all about getting busy, ready for an IPO.

    The Unity desktop was introduced back in 2011 and while Shuttleworth was rather keen on it, other Ubuntu fans were not.

  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 24 Oct 2017
  • Cinergy makes significant digital signage savings using Ubuntu Core

    Based in Dallas, Texas, Cinergy operates a chain of three cinema entertainment centres (CECs) with ambitious expansion plans. CECs are an all in one entertainment venue incorporating cinemas, restaurants, bowling and other activities such as escape rooms. With so many activities to communicate including the latest promotions and film times, Cinergy’s digital signage set up needs to be efficient, secure and effective.

  • What to Expect from the Ubuntu 17.10 Release

    One of the hottest events this month for Linux/Ubuntu users is the release of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark). For those who are not fans of Ubuntu and Linux in general, this might be just one more release to miss, but this is a release you should take note of. The major news here is that this is the first release since Canonical decided to move away from Unity. But there is more!

  • Preparing for Xubuntu 18.04

    Xubuntu 17.10 was just released, but planning for Xubuntu 18.04 – the next long-term support (LTS) release – began quite some time ago. For our users, LTS releases mostly mean a system that is going to be more stable and supported for longer. For us contributors, this means a bunch of things.

    As a repercussion of the longer support cycle and the sought out stable nature of the LTS releases, we do not want to introduce (too many) new components, libraries or other technical changes, as each change has regression potential. This is also a delicate balancing act between getting bugs fixed but keeping enough things as they are.

Canonical founder explains why they abandoned the Unity project for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Back in April, Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth, in a move that shocked everyone, announced that the company was ending support for Unity in Ubuntu. For the uninitiated, Unity was the company's plan to build a converged Linux desktop that would work on mobile devices, desktops, and even TVs. Its latest release, Ubuntu 17.10, marks the first version of the OS to ship without Unity, employing GNOME instead. After several months of speculation, Shuttleworth has finally outed the rationale behind the decision.

Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Will Likely Ship With Linux 4.15

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, the recently named "Bionic Beaver", will most likely be shipping with a Linux 4.15-based kernel.

  • Display Network Traffic in the Ubuntu Panel with NetSpeed

    If you’re running Ubuntu 17.10 (or any distro that uses GNOME Shell) you can do so easily by installing a network monitor GNOME extension.

    A wealth of network monitor extensions are available for GNOME Shell (and by extension, excuse the pun, Ubuntu too) including ‘netmonitor‘ and ‘simple net speed‘.

    But one of my favourites (because of its sheer simplicity) is the perfectly titled NetSpeed.

  • Why Did Ubuntu Drop Unity? Mark Shuttleworth Explains

    Ubuntu’s decision to ditch Unity took all of us — even me — by surprise when announced back in April.

    Now Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth shares more details about why Ubuntu chose to drop Unity.

    And the answer might surprise…

    Actually, no; the answer probably won’t surprise you.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is Called ‘Bionic Beaver’

    The Ubuntu 18.04 LTS name has been revealed — say hello to ‘Bionic Beaver’!

    Announcing the name with his trademark alliterative flair set firmly to full, Mark Shuttleworth says the 18.04 LTS release will “represent the sum of all our interests.”

  • Mark Shuttleworth reveals Ubuntu 18.04 LTS codename

    In the past couple of days, Canonical released its latest version of Ubuntu 17.10, now it’s time for the company to look ahead to its next release 18.04 LTS (Long Term Support). As will all versions before it, 18.04 will carry a goofy codename with it. The company’s CEO, today, announced that the upcoming release will be dubbed "Bionic Beaver".

Samsung adds more secure Artik models, and switches from Fedora to Ubuntu

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Samsung unveiled extra-secure versions of its Artik COMs, including a new Artik 055s model, and it’s switching its Artik 530 and 710 from Fedora to Ubuntu.

At last week’s Samsung Developer Conference (SDC) 2017 in San Francisco, Samsung announced several updates to its Artik line of computer-on-modules. The Korean CE giant has always touted the security features of its Artik modules, but it now has taken the extra step of releasing new security enhanced versions of its major Artik modules. The ultra-secure Artik 053s, 530s, and 710s COMs are priced the same as the earlier, almost identical Artik 053, 530, and 710, which will presumably be phased out.

Read more

Should You Use Linux Mint's Debian or Standard Edition?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

At first, users might wonder why Linux Mint offers both its Ubuntu-based Linux Mint Standard Edition and the Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE). Since Debian, Linux Mint, and Ubuntu all derive from the Debian repositories, isn't the family resemblance too close to bother?

To the casual user, the choice may appear to be no more than the result of Linux Mint trying to accommodate as many users as possible. However, depending on your needs and preferences, you may find that one edition suits your needs more than the other.

In general, the two editions have much in common. Both the Debian and the standard editions are available in 32- and 64-bit downloads that default to the Cinnamon or Mate desktops. Both use the same installer, and both open for the first time on desktops with similar wallpapers and tools. Both, too, can add other desktop environments from the Mint repositories that they both share. According to Linux Mint, LMDE is faster than the standard edition, but in practice the difference is slight enough that many users probably never notice.

However, look closer, and the differences start to appear -- although these difference have changed over the years. For example, it is no longer true that the LMDE is a rolling release -- one that adds new packages as they become available, rather than waiting for a general release -- although LMDE 1 was.

Also, contrary to a widely circulating story, LMDE 2 is fully capable of using Ubuntu PPA repositories for packages in development. The PPAs simply have to be added as a package source in /etc/apt/. Alternatively, their packages can be downloaded and installed using the dpkg command. Since Debian and Ubuntu have been different distros for well over a decade now, you may find that some packages from PPAs are not compatible with Debian, but these cases are relatively rare, particularly if you stick to productivity applications rather than core system components.

Read more

Beavering away at the brilliantly bionic 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Congratulations to Team *Buntu on the release of our Artful Aardvark 17.10, featuring all your favourite desktop environments, kubernetes 1.8, the latest OpenStack, and security updates for 9 months, which takes us all the way to our next enterprise release, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

A brumous development cycle always makes for cool-headed work and brisk progress on the back of breem debate.

As always, 18.04 LTS will represent the sum of all our interests.

For those of you with bimodal inclinations, there’s the official upstream Kubernetes-on-Ubuntu spell for ‘conjure-up kubernetes’ with bijou multi-cloud goodness. We also have spells for OpenStack on Ubuntu and Hadoop on Ubuntu, so conjure-up is your one-stop magic shop for at-scale boffo big data, cloud and containers. Working with upstreams to enable fast deployment and operations of their stuff on all the clouds is a beamish way to spend the day.

If your thing is bling, pick a desktop! We’ve defaulted to GNOME, but we’re the space where KDE and GNOME and MATE and many others come together to give users real and easy choice of desktops. And if you’re feeling boned by the lack of Unity in open source, you might want to hop onto the channel and join those who are updating Unity7 for the newest X and kernel graphics in 18.04.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Dubbed as the "Bionic Beaver," Launches April 26, 2018

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Is The "Bionic Beaver"

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Is Named ‘Bionic Beaver’

Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 and Recommended Applications for Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 Releases for Chinese Linux Users with Own Video Player, More

    The Ubuntu Kylin team was pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 for Chinese Linux users as part of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

    Coming with the same internals of Ubuntu 17.10, the Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 release adds improvements to the desktop environment and featured applications. It's powered by the latest Linux 4.13 kernel, which features asynchronous I/O improvements, SMB 3.0 as default protocol for CIFS mounts, and several EXT4 enhancements.

    Its MATE-based UKUI desktop environment received a brand-new icon theme, Start Menu optimizations, adjustments to the lockscreen setting page and control panel layout, as well as various improvements to the file manager, including new "Unzip" and "Open by Terminal" functions in the right-click context menu.

  • Recommended Applications for Ubuntu 17.10

    Here I list useful free software applications for Ubuntu 17.10 users. This including lightweight web browsers, video player, and also alternatives to Adobe Photoshop, CorelDRAW, or such nonfree software applications. You also can read how to install them here. I hope this list will help you in your first days using Artful Aardvark!

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Julita Inca Chiroque: Parallel Computing Talk
  • Open Source Monitoring Conference: Speakers, Agendas, and Other Details
    One of today’s leading tech conferences, the Open Source Monitoring Conference (OSMC), is back to bring together some of the brightest monitoring experts from different parts of the world. The four-day event will be held at Holiday Inn Nuremberg City Conference in Germany starting today, November 21st, until November 24th.
  • Why a Dallas-area tech startup opened a KC office
  • Open education: How students save money by creating open textbooks
    Most people consider a college education the key to future success, but for many students, the cost is insurmountable. The growing open educational resource (OER) movement is attempting to address this problem by providing a high-quality, low-cost alternative to traditional textbooks, while at the same time empowering students and educators in innovative ways. One of the leaders in this movement is Robin DeRosa, a professor at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. I have been enthusiastically following her posts on Twitter and invited her to share her passion for open education with our readers. I am delighted to share our discussion with you.

Android Leftovers

Linux 4.10 To Linux 4.15 Kernel Benchmarks

The ThinkPad X1 Carbon has been enjoying its time on Linux 4.15. In addition to the recent boot time tests and kernel power comparison, here are some raw performance benchmarks looking at the speed from Linux 4.10 through Linux 4.15 Git. With this Broadwell-era Core i7 5600U laptop with 8GB RAM, HD Graphics, and 128GB SATA 3.0 SSD with Ubuntu 17.10 x86_64, the Linux 4.10 through 4.15 Git mainline kernels were benchmarked. Each one was tested "out of the box" and the kernel builds were obtained from the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel archive. Read more