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Ubuntu

Graphical Abstinence, Living the Terminal Life

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Software
Ubuntu

In today’s modern world of multi-gigabyte browser based applications we can get overwhelmed by busy, interrupting graphical environments. Sometimes it’s nice to downsize and focus, VT100-style. So let’s leverage the power of the terminal to get stuff done with a selection of apps, utilities and a couple of games for your Linux console.

You can stay up to date with our editorial picks by following Snapcraft on Facebook where we share three new and interesting snaps a week. We’d also love to hear what your favourite snaps are, perhaps you’ve found something we’ve missed. Let us know!

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ExTiX "The Ultimate Linux System" Now Uses Linux 4.18, Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

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Linux
Ubuntu

Based on packages from the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series, ExTiX 18.7 is the first release of the GNU/Linux distribution to use the forthcoming Linux 4.18 kernel series, which is currently in development and should hit the streets early next month.

Arne Exton was brave enough to rebase his ExTiX Linux operating system on the fifth Release Candidate of Linux kernel 4.18, which is patched to allow the installation of Nvidia’s proprietary graphics drivers. Arne Exton's 4.18.0-rc5-extix kernel replaces kernel 4.16.2-exton used in the previous release, but it's an unstable kernel.

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Ubuntu/GNOME Theme and Improving GHashTable

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GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.10's New Community Theme Is Named Yaru, Here's What It Looks Like

    Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche announced today the name and plans of the community theme that's being prepared for the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release.

    As you're probably aware the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system will feature brand-new system theme and icons by default for new installations, and the theme has been developed by various members of the Ubuntu community instead of Canonical's employees. Until today, the theme was known as Communitheme, but from now on it's called Yaru.

  • Didier Roche: Open The Cosmic Gate: A beautiful theme gets a beautiful name

    Communitheme has been a community effort from the start with an overwhelming amount of feedback from an even larger community. Surprisingly, the still ongoing discussion thread of more than 1500 messages hasn’t (yet?) broken discourse!

    However, the effort to refresh the look and feel of Ubuntu has gone way beyond just a theme. From the start, Sam Hewitt’s beautiful Suru icons were included and over time, the effort brought new system sounds and new cursors under its wing. Some of the design discussions have gone even further than this, but the desire to stay as close to upstream GNOME as possible has put most of those in the freezer for now. So, in order to reflect the broad scope and in light of its upcoming inclusion in Ubuntu, a new name is in order.

    [...]

    Note that screenshots are still Work In Progress, there is still some discussions about keeping the Ubuntu logo by default on the launcher or not and other fundamentals changes that the community can decide until the Cosmic Cuttlefish release.

  • A hash table re-hash

    Hash tables! They’re everywhere. They’re also pretty boring, but I’ve had GLib issue #1198 sitting around for a while, and the GNOME move to GitLab resulted in a helpful reminder (or two) being sent out that convinced me to look into it again with an eye towards improving GHashTable and maybe answering some domain-typical questions, like “You’re using approach X, but I’ve heard approach Y is better. Why don’t you use that instead?” and “This other hash table is 10% faster in my extremely specific test. Why is your hash table so bad?”.

    And unfairly paraphrased as those questions may be, I have to admit I’m curious too. Which means benchmarks. But first, what exactly makes a hash table good? Well, it depends on what you’re looking for. I made a list.

Canonical: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Desktop Team Report From GUADEC 2018 and Ubuntu 17.10 EOL

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 537

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 537 for the week of July 15 – 21, 2018

  • Desktop team report from GUADEC 2018

    This year’s GUADEC [https://2018.guadec.org/] (GNOME Users And Developers Conference) took place in Almeria, Spain. The main conference was from 6th to 11th July, and for a few days prior to that where the GNOME Advisory Board met for an in-person catch up, and a few days afterwards for BOF days where developers met to discuss and work on specific topics which were interesting to them.

    Canonical are proud to have sponsored the conference and to send seven members of the Ubuntu Desktop team. We had a great conference and are already looking forward to next year.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 is no longer supported

    Those who are still using Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" should now update to the version 18.04 (nicknamed "Bionic Beaver") of this popular Linux distribution. Ubuntu 17.10 arrived on October 19, 2017, and it only received 9 months of support — as it happens with all non-LTS Ubuntu Linux releases.

Canonical Fixes Boot Failures on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS, Update Now

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Ubuntu

About two weeks ago, Canonical patched a regression that would lead to boot failures on some AMD machines using the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series, which was caused by a microcode firmware update for AMD processors that was supposed to mitigate the well-known Spectre microprocessor side-channel security vulnerability.

Earlier this month, on July 2, Canonical released a Linux kernel security update for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) users, addressing a total of six security vulnerabilities, one of which introduced a regression also causing boot failures, though it doesn't appear to be limited to AMD processors only, but also to Intel machines.

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Microsoft Uses Canonical/Snap as a 'Ramp' Against Bash/UNIX/Linux

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Microsoft
Ubuntu
  • PowerShell launches as a snap

    PowerShell Core from Microsoft is now available for Linux as a Snap. Built on the .NET Framework, PowerShell is an open source task-based command-line shell and scripting language with the goal of being the ubiquitous language for managing hybrid cloud assets. It is designed specifically for system administrators and power-users to rapidly automate the administration of multiple operating systems and the processes related to the applications that run on those operating systems.

  • PowerShell Core now available as a Snap package

    The goal of PowerShell Core is to be the ubiquitous language for managing your assets in the hybrid cloud. That’s why we’ve worked to make it available on many operating systems, architectures, and flavors of Linux, macOS, and Windows as possible.

  • Microsoft's PowerShell Available on Ubuntu as a Snap, Here's How to Install It

    Canonical and Microsoft announced today that PowerShell automation and configuration management system is now available as a Snap package for Ubuntu Linux and other Snap-enabled GNU/Linux distributions.

    Consisting of a cross-platform command-line shell and related scripting language, as well as a framework for dealing with cmdlets, Microsoft's PowerShell works on Windows, macOS, and Linux platforms to allow power-users and system administrators to have better and automated control over the administration of several operating systems.

  • Microsoft's PowerShell Now Available On Ubuntu In Snap Form

    Canonical and Microsoft have just announced that PowerShell Core is now available for Ubuntu users in Snap format.

    Back in the summer of 2016, Microsoft open-sourced PowerShell with plans to support Linux. PowerShell has been available on Linux for a while now without too much adoption while now it's available in Snap form for making it easy to deploy on Ubuntu and other Snap-supported platforms.

Canonical/Ubuntu: End of Ubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu Podcast, Snaps Add Flexibility with Tracks and Canonical Needs Help

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Ubuntu
  • PSA: Support for Ubuntu 17.10 Ends Today

    Ubuntu 17.10 reaches end of life on July 19, 2018 — which if you haven’t checked your calendar recently, is today. If you have thus far managed to resist the temptation to upgrade to a newer release then alas: today is the day when you need to start thinking about it.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E19 – Nineteen Minutes - Ubuntu Podcast

    It’s Season 11 Episode 19 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Ryan are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Snaps Add Flexibility with Tracks

    Snap packages have a rich set of features beyond getting the latest shiny on your Linux distribution. Tracks enable developers to publish multiple supported releases of their application under the same name. With this enabled, a user can switch tracks at any time to install and use an alternate supported relase of software.

    Within each track are four standard channels named edge, beta, candidate and stable. The channels represent the risk-level users should expect from the snaps within. Edge snaps (typically built from the latest code committed) would be riskier to use than beta releases, which are more risky than stable releases.

    By default every application has one ‘latest’ track and the four named channels. Developers can optionally choose whether to supplement that with additional tracks. Further the developer can choose which channels to use within those tracks.

  • Canonical Needs Your Help to Test the Improved Ubuntu 18.04.1 Server Installer

    Canonical's Dimitri John Ledkov put out a call for testing for the Ubuntu community to help them test drive the improved Ubuntu Server installer in the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS point release.

    Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, the first of a total of five scheduled point releases of the long-term supported Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series is about to be released in approximately one week from the moment of writing, on July 26, 2018, with improved and up-to-date core components and apps.

  • Help Test the New Ubuntu Server Installer

    I only ask because Canonical’s server bods are currently looking for wily folks to help them test an improved version of the new Ubuntu Server installer.

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Released nine months ago on October 19, 2017, Ubuntu 17.10 was dubbed "Artful Aardvark" by Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth because it was the first release of the Ubuntu Linux operating system to ship with the GNOME desktop environment instead of Unity on the Desktop edition.

To due to the sudden move from Unity to GNOME, Ubuntu 17.10 brought several substantial changes, such as the switch to the next-generation Wayland display server by default instead of X.Org Server, a decision that was reverted with the release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), and the discontinuation of the Ubuntu GNOME flavor.

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Ubuntu: Server Installer, IoT Security, Snaps, Xubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • The improved 18.04.1 LTS Server Installer - Call for testing!

    With the release of 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver the new server installer
    was introduced. At the time, it still lacked certain critical features
    which have now been implemented.

  • Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS Introducing Revised Server Installer, Adds Missing Features

    With the April release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on the server front was a brand new, in-house developed server installer created by Canonical to differentiate it from Debian's long-used text installer for the Ubuntu Server images. While it offered a fresh look and some new features, it shipped without many features common to Linux server installers. Fortunately, that is changing with the upcoming Ubuntu Server 18.04.1 release.

    As expected, Canonical is filling in the gaps with their new server installer dubbed Subiquity. With the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS release they will be shipping a new version of this installer.

    This updated installer now supports LVM, RAID, VLAN, and bonds -- important features missing originally from Ubuntu Server 18.04.0. The functionality is now in place with the latest daily images although the text-based user-interface is still being refined.

  • IoT Security at Scale: Managing end-to-end security
  • Perfectly Formed Snaps Challenge

    Snaps are perfect for the smaller things in life too. Looking away from the graphical flagship apps, the snap store hosts lightweight server daemons, command line utilities, developer tools and even tiny games.

    Recently, a couple of petite snaps were published in the store. Sparky is a simple game played in a terminal, and a modest 32KB on disk. Bash-Shell-RPG is similarly diminutive at only 8KB. Neither contain an excess of additional libraries, just the absolute minimum needed to function everywhere.

  • What’s New in Xubuntu 18.04 LTS

    Xubuntu 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Xubuntu, it now available to download and install on your laptop and PC. This release features latest version of Xfce 4.12 as default desktop, include latest Xfce components.

    Xubuntu 18.04 LTS also comes with an updated Greybird GTK+ theme that includes a new dark style, better HiDPI support, greater consistency between GTK+ 2 and GTK+ 3 apps, GTK+ 3 styles for Google Chrome and Chromium web browsers, smaller switches, and improved scales. However, the GTK Theme Configuration tool was removed and it’s no longer possible to override colors in themes.

Lubuntu 18.10 May Support 32-Bit PCs If There's Demand, Here's How You Can Help

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Ubuntu

After it was decided earlier this year when the development of the next Lubuntu release, 18.10, kicked off that 32-bit installations will be dropped, Lubuntu developer Simon Quigley informs us that the team behind the lightweight GNU/Linux distribution wants to give 32-bit support one more chance if there's still demand from the community.

Starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release, which is currently scheduled for an October 18, 2018, release, the official flavors won't be shipping with 32-bit installation images, except Lubuntu if users are interested in helping testing and 32-bit (i386) ISOs. Otherwise, Lubuntu 18.10 will not ship with 32-bit installation images.

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Also: Lubuntu Needs Help Testing For 32-bit x86 Support To Continue

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New Devices With Defective Intel Chips and Linux Support

  • Linux-friendly embedded computer runs on Apollo Lake power
    Axiomtek has released a rugged, Ubuntu-ready “eBOX627-312-FL” embedded PC with a dual-core Celeron N3350, 2x GbE, 6x USB, and 4x serial ports plus mini-PCIe, HDMI, SATA, and “Flexible I/O.”
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