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Ubuntu

Newbie's Guide to Ubuntu 17.10 and More Information

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Ubuntu
  • Newbie's Guide to Ubuntu 17.10 Part 1

    This is a tutorial series for newbies to operate Ubuntu 17.10. This is targeted to help newbies from MS Windows environment to run Ubuntu. This series is divided into 3 parts: first operating the desktop, second navigating the file manager, and third setting the system so it suits your needs. After the final part, this will be re-published as an ebook of UbuntuBuzz. So start your Ubuntu and enjoy this!

  • Ubuntu 17.10 New Features, Release Date and Upgrade Procedure

    Ubuntu 17.10 is a short-term release and will be supported for nine months. Which means that in July 2018, you must upgrade to a newer version or else you won’t get system and security updates.

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Debian and Ubuntu: Development, Nominations to the LoCo Council, Kubernetes on Ubuntu VMs and Docker Swarm

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • My Free Software Activities in September 2017
  • My FOSS activities for August & September 2017
  • Call for nominations to the LoCo Council

    As you may know the LoCo council members are set with a two years term. Due this situation we are facing the difficult task of replacing existing members and a whole set of restaffing. A special thanks to all the existing members for all of the great contributions they have made while serving with us on the LoCo Council.

  • Kubernetes on Ubuntu VMs

    Recently /u/Elezium asked the following question on Reddit: Tools to deploy k8s on-premise on top of Ubuntu. This is a question that a lot of people have answered using a combination of MAAS/VMWare/OpenStack for on premise multi-node Kubernetes. If you’re looking for something with more than a two or three machines, those resources are bountiful.

    However, the question came to “How do I do Kubernetes on an existing Ubuntu VM”. This is different from LXD, which is typically a good solution — though without a bunch of networking modifications it won’t be reachable from outside that VM.

  • What you need to know: Kubernetes and Swarm

    Kubernetes and Docker Swarm are both popular and well-known container orchestration platforms. You don't need a container orchestrator to run a container, but they are important for keeping your containers healthy and add enough value to mean you need to know about them.

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Ubuntu: Development Updates, MAAS 2.3.0 Beta, Heroku and Writing Japanese

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Ubuntu

How Ubuntu Laptop Performance Has Evolved Over Three Years From 14.10 To 17.10

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

With the upcoming release of Ubuntu 17.10, I was curious to see how its performance compares to that of the three-year-old Ubuntu 14.10. Here are some benchmark results showing how an Intel ultrabook/laptop performance has evolved on Linux during that time.

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Computers4Christians miraculously appears on Ubuntu wiki

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu's wiki page this morning temporarily played host to a bit of info from religious group Computers4Christians, whose aim is to propagate the use of its operating system to spread the word of the Lord.

It is not known who is behind the hijack.

While many open-source advocates might appear to be on a mission from God already, these ones literally are. C4C's homepage hijack said the body's operating system "seeks to lead unbelievers to a relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ and nurture believers in discipleship".

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Resetting Ubuntu Desktop and Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Preview

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Ubuntu
  • The Secret Command to Reset Ubuntu Desktop to Default Settings

    We show you how to reset Ubuntu to its default settings. Whether you're running Unity or GNOME Shell, you can easily reset Ubuntu to its factory settings.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Preview Part 7: Beta 2

    Artful Beta 2 (aka the Final Beta) released recently at 29 September 2017. This is the last Beta before the real final stable later at 19 October. We can download the Beta 2 now and see how will the stable be. The important news of this Part 7 are there is no 32bit version, the desktop is really moved to GNOME, memory consumption is still huge, new wallpapers and user experience. We hope the final stable will be ultimately better and wonderful. Enjoy!

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Ubuntu, Pop!_OS, and Tails 3.2

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Canonical releases final beta of Ubuntu 17.10

    Canonical has released the final beta of Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark for Desktop, Server, and Cloud products. It represents the last major development before the release candidate which ships a week before the final release, which itself is scheduled for the October 19. Ubuntu 17.10 is not an LTS so it’ll be supported for just nine months.

  • Ubuntu Linux 17.10 'Artful Aardvark' Beta 2 now available to download

    Fall is officially here, and while some people get excited for pumpkin spice lattes and falling leaves, other folks get excited about something far nerdier -- Ubuntu. Yes, every October a new version of the Linux-based operating system is released. This year in particular is very significant, as with Ubuntu 17.10, GNOME is replacing Unity as the default desktop environment.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 2 Released With New Features — Download ISO And Torrent Files Here

    This year’s second Ubuntu release is just around the corner. Codenamed Artful Aardvark, Ubuntu 17.10’s Final Beta has landed and its download links are available for testing. Ubuntu 17.10 final will be released on October 19, 2017.

    You might be knowing that the flagship version of Ubuntu, which now ships with GNOME desktop environment, doesn’t take part in Alpha 1, Alpha 2, and Beta 1 milestone releases. So, in a way, it’s the first, polished chance to try out all the new Ubuntu 17.10 features.

  • Ubuntu to Stop Offering 32-Bit ISO Images, Joining Many Other Linux Distros

    Canonical engineer Dimitri John Ledkov announced on Wednesday that Ubuntu does not plan to offer 32-bit ISO installation images for its new OS version starting with the next release — Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) scheduled for release on October 19.

    The decision comes after month-long discussions on the dwindling market share of 32-bit architectures.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta Is Ready For Testing

    Overnight the final beta of Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" was released for Ubuntu proper and its derivative friends.

  • Ubuntu to drop 32bit Desktop ISO images from 17.10 release

    Unsurprisingly, Ubuntu has planned to follow the same path that other major distributions have, and drop 32bit ISO images for upcoming releases.

    Dimitri John Ledkov from Canonical, sent out a message through their mailing list to the release team, instructing them to not release a 32bit ISO for the upcoming Ubuntu release.

  • System76 Pop!_OS Beta Ubuntu-based Linux Distro For Developers Is Here
  • Tails 3.2 released with several changes and Linux 4.12

    Whenever Mozilla pushes out a new version of its Firefox web browser, you can always guarantee that an update to the Tor Browser and the Tails operating system will be close behind, alas, with Firefox 56 being released on Thursday, Tails 3.2 followed close behind. The release ships with Linux Kernel 4.12.12 which should improve hardware support if you've been having any issues, the NVIDIA Maxwell graphics card is a notable bit of kit supported by the new kernel.

GPD Pocket Ubuntu Editon Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Netbooks are often ridiculed as a solution looking for a problem but they are also regarded as the ancestors of present day Chromebooks and “cloudbooks”. With the resurgence of these more modern but still low-performance devices, it might seem that the netbook is due for a revival as well. Or so that seems to be the proposition GPD makes with its almost literal Pocket computer. But does that make more sense now than it did before, especially in an age of powerful smartphones? We take the Ubuntu Edition of the GPD Pocket for a good and thorough testing to find out.

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Ubuntu: *Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 2, 32-Bit, ARTIK, and IoT modules

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Final Beta Ready for Download, Here's What's New

    Canonical today released the Final Beta release of its forthcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, allowing anyone to see what they prepared for this new Ubuntu version that will be hitting the streets on October 19, 2017.

    First and foremost, Ubuntu 17.10 is shipping with a refreshed desktop environment, powered by the latest GNOME 3.26 release, highly customized by Canonical to resemble the look and feel of its deprecated Unity user interface. This is also the first release of Ubuntu to ship without Unity in more than six years.

  • An Ubuntu Kernel Spin Of AMDGPU DC "drm-next-4.15-dc"

    Yesterday was the very exciting news of the AMDGPU DC code finally being called for pulling to DRM-Next for integration in the Linux 4.15 kernel. So far it's looking like that will indeed happen for Linux 4.15 assuming Linus Torvalds has no objections. If you want to test out this kernel for HDMI/DP audio, Radeon RX Vega display support, atomic mode-setting, or other modern features, here is an Ubuntu kernel spin.

  • Canonical to end 32-bit installation options with Ubuntu 17.10 Linux

    Ubuntu, arguably the most popular (or, at least, widely used) desktop distribution of Linux, is to drop support for 32-bit installations in favour of 64-bit - some 14 years after the introduction of the AMD64 instruction set.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 for desktop won't ship a 32-bit version

    Beginning with Ubuntu 17.10, due next month, Canonical will stop building 32-bit versions of its operating system for desktop machines. The move has been pushed by Dimitri Ledkov, a familiar name which cropped up in a Neowin article last year discussing the same topic. If you have a 32-bit machine running Ubuntu you should probably stick with Ubuntu 16.04 and start looking for a replacement device.

  • Ubuntu to stop releasing 32-bit desktop ISOs

    But it seems like not all that many people are using recent builds of Ubuntu to do that… because the developers have decided to make it a bit tougher to install the popular Linux distro on computers with 32-bit processors.

  • Samsung selects Ubuntu 16.04 as primary Linux distro for some ARTIK IoT modules

    Next month, Ubuntu 17.10 will be released. Even after that release, version 16.04 will remain the most recent LTS version. If you aren't familiar, LTS stands for "Long Term Support," which quite literally means it is supported by Canonical for a longer period of time. For instance, Ubuntu 16.04 will be supported until 2021, while the newer 17.04 is only supported until 2018.

    Today, Canonical announces that Samsung has selected version 16.04 LTS of the operating system as the primary Linux distro for some of the ARTIK internet of things modules. This is a smart choice by Samsung, because long support is preferable to bleeding edge for an IoT device.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Primary Linux OS of Samsung ARTIK 5 and 7 Smart IoT Modules

    Canonical recently partnered with Samsung to bring its Ubuntu Linux operating system to the Samsung ARTIK 5 and 7 family of smart IoT (Internet of Things) modules used in a wide-range of appliances.

    Samsung decided to enable the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) operating system as primary GNU/Linux distribution for its Samsung ARTIK platform instead of the existing OS, which wasn't mentioned in the press announcement. Choosing Ubuntu as primary Linux distro is a great move as it lets ARTIK’s developers access various of the supported connectivity options, such as Zigbee, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth.

  • Canonical's eyes are on IoT

    When Mark Shuttleworth founded Canonical in 2004, the idea behind the company was simple – promote the use of Ubuntu Linux as a desktop operating system. Fourteen years later, things have gotten a lot more complicated, as the prominent open source software vendor eyes the IoT market.

    Canonical’s still flying the flag for desktop Linux, but the company’s real business is in the cloud – it claims that Ubuntu accounts for about 60% of all Linux instances in the major public clouds – and it’s hoping to make its mark in the next-buzziest part of the technology sector, the Internet of Things.

    According to Mike Bell, Canonical’s executive vice president for devices and IoT, the way businesses have begun to develop software for IoT devices has been advantageous for them – companies have started to take server or desktop distros and cut them down into software that works on embedded devices. Since Ubuntu is a familiar and well-known framework, it was a natural choice as a starting place.

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PC-MOS/386 is the latest obsolete operating system to open source on Github

PC-MOS/386 was first announced by The Software Link in 1986 and was released in early 1987. It was capable of working on any x86 computer (though the Intel 80386 was its target market). However, some later chips became incompatible because they didn't have the necessary memory management unit. It had a dedicated following but also contained a couple of design flaws that made it slow and/or expensive to run. Add to that the fact it had a Y2K bug that manifested on 31 July 2012, after which any files created wouldn't work, and it's not surprising that it didn't become the gold standard. The last copyright date listed is 1992, although some users have claimed to be using it far longer. Read more