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Ubuntu

Can Ubuntu save online banking?

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.computerworld.com: I do my online banking from the same home computer the rest of the family uses for Web surfing and online games. I have the McAfee security suite loaded and do regular scans so accessing online banking should be protected. Right?

IBM, Simmtronics to offer $190 Linux netbooks

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

liliputing.com: The Simmtronics Simmbook isn’t exactly a state of the art netbook. It features a 1.6GHz Intel Atom N270 CPU, 10.1 inch, 1024 x 600 pixel display, 1GB of RAM, and Ubuntu Linux.

Things I hate about Ubuntu 10.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Things I hate About Ubuntu 10.04
  • Ubuntu 10.04 in focus: Empathy
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Less in more. But still less.
  • Big Button Game: Metacity Introduces Flexibility
  • Ubuntu Road Test (Final Report)

Divided we stand, united we fall

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Ubuntu
  • Divided we stand, united we fall
  • Comments to Ubuntu 10.04 Reads File Sizes Differently
  • Lubuntu - Ubuntu with LXDE desktop
  • Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (lucid lynx)

To Mark Shuttleworth on Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • To Mark Shuttleworth on Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.04 Installation Slideshow Gets Updated
  • Its beauty is in its potential
  • Why Docky’s GMail Docklet Doesn’t currently work in Ubuntu 10.04

ZaReason Teo, with an Ubuntu twist

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

linux-netbook.com: Linux system builder ZaReason appears to have launched a new Linux netbook. While there’s no information about the new Teo netbook on the ZaReason web site, you can already order one from Amazon for $460.

Ubuntu shops prefer the bleeding edge

Filed under
Ubuntu

theregister.co.uk: In preparation for the rollout of Ubuntu Server 10.04 Long Term Support next month, Canonical, the commercial sponsor of the Linux variant, and the Ubuntu community polled Ubuntu users to see how they use the operating system.

Ubuntu 10.4 beta is bloody brilliant

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.4 beta is bloody brilliant
  • Lucid starts to get some updated icons
  • The Gnome war on features continues…

Hands-on: Ubuntu One music store will rock in Lucid Lynx

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

arstechnica.com: Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution, has announced the official launch of the Ubuntu One music store. Integrated into the Rhythmbox music player in the upcoming Ubuntu 10.04 release, the store allows users to purchase downloadable songs and albums.

Ubuntu, Buttons, and Democracy

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: When Ubuntu drinks, the free and open source software (FOSS) community gets a hangover. The distribution is so influential that its every development sends echoes rippling through the greater community.

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Canonical Releases New Linux Kernel Update for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr)

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Civil society pushing open source in Bulgaria

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Most popular web browsers among Fedora users

Google Chrome is the most popular browser in the world. It is so popular that some call it a new Internet Explorer. But that’s based on global stats. In Red Hat, I’m responsible for web browsers, so I wondered what are the most popular web browsers among Fedora users. So I asked through Fedora accounts on Facebook and Google+: “Which browser do you use the most in Fedora?” Read more

Life in a Post-Container World and Why Linux Will Play a Diminished Role

Containers have actually been with us since the late 1990s, but they are not the end of the story. The real transformation will come with a “serverless” future that will completely overturn the ops ecosystem. Companies will go out of business, new ones will spring to life, and thousands of people will have fundamental changes to their jobs. The shift to a serverless future is much bigger than your normal hype cycle — I believe the current container hoopla is a foreshock preceding a 9.0 quake. Read more