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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Next with Unity 8 and Mir on the Desktop – Screen Tour

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Canonical is planning to bring the Unity 8 to the desktop, but it will take a while until this task is accomplished. Until then, users can test the new Ubuntu Next images, which incorporate Unity 8 and the Mir display server.

Ubuntu developers have been working very hard on the new Unity 8 desktop environment, but their progress has been limited so far on the mobile phones. With the work that’s being done for Ubuntu Touch RTM and Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn), the implementation of the new desktop is now on a back burner.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Beta 1 (Utopic Unicorn) to Arrive in a Couple of Days

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Ubuntu

"So Beta 1 is this week and I'll be taking care of the builds and paperwork. Could participating flavours please get in touch here or on IRC? In the mean time, I'm going to assume a participation similar to Alpha-2 and configure cron, propose-migration and the tracker accordingly, then build a first candidate for each of your flavours," wrote Canonical's Stéphane Graber.

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Google Chrome 37 Stable Arrives with Better Unity Integration in Ubuntu

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Google
Ubuntu

Google Chrome 37 is now the current stable version of the Internet browser from Google. It's a release that's more focused on security than anything else, but there are a few new features. It won't feel different from the 36.x branch that users have just upgraded from, but that shouldn't be a reason not to update the software.

One of the most important issues solved in Google Chrome 37 only applies for the Windows platform, which received DirectWrite support for improved font rendering. This wasn't an issue on Linux or Mac OS X, so it looks like only Windows was left behind on this issue. The developers also said that a few new apps and extension APIs have been added, and numerous changes have been made in terms of stability.

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NASA's Kennedy Space Center Uses Ubuntu to Plan for the Exploration of Alien Planets

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Linux
Ubuntu

It's not a secret that most of the scientific community likes and uses open source software. The reasons for this choice are numerous, but the bottom line is that wherever you see any kind of scientific endeavor, either at CERN, the Fermi Laboratories, or even NASA, it's always powered by open source software.

A few engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center are working on some robots that will one day be used to roam the surface of other planets and moons. They are autonomous and they are designed to look for and gather various resources, among other tasks.

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Spice Fire One now in India: A look at alternate mobile OSes beyond Android, iOS, WP8

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Linux
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Finally, Firefox smartphone now arrives in India. Though Mozilla’s Firefox OS as a smartphone operating system has had a negligible impact on the market, but all that could change very soon as the first Firefox smartphone has been announced for India. The Spice Fire One has predictable low-end specifications and a greatly attractive price tag of Rs 2,299.

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Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Hits Feature Freeze

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) is going to pass through several development stages and the Feature Freeze is just one of them. This means that developers can no longer get new features and major changes into the system, unless it’s important enough to get an exemption.

“As of nowish, Feature Freeze is in effect for utopic (14.10), leading up to the release in October. Don't fret if you have One Last Feature to get uploaded, and don't panic and upload it untested today just to try to beat the clock. We would rather see a feature freeze exception bug and a well-tested upload than something rushed to beat a deadline.”

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The Ubuntu Touch Image #203 Is Quite Fast And Stable

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Ubuntu

The developers have started the work for the RTM (release to manufacturing) version of Ubuntu Touch, which will get only bug-fixes.

Ubuntu Touch is developed on three branches: Utopic, which is the “stable” branch, the development branch utopic-devel and the RTM branch, which, unlike the two others, is not available for public yet.

So, if you want an Ubuntu Touch version that receives all the new features in time, got for the “stable” branch. And for an Ubuntu Touch with less bugs and crashes, try the Ubuntu RTM.

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Ubuntu Touch Gets Major Update and the OS Is Now Crazy Fast – Screenshot Tour

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Touch has just received a new major update and the developers have made some serious changes to the operating system, which now feels a lot faster and the experience is a lot smoother.

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Rugged mini-PCs have four gigabit ports, run Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Stealth.com has launched four rugged mini-PCs based on 3rd Gen. Intel Core CPUs, featuring four gigabit ports, Ubuntu, and optional PCI and PCIe expansion.

The four new LPC480x models are the latest members of the Little PC family of mini-PCs from Stealth.com (formerly Stealth Computer), which include the circa-2011, Intel Atom D525 based LPC-125LPM. The company sells about 50 different LPC models available with Windows or Ubuntu Linux. The systems are designed for embedded control, digital signs, kiosks, mobile navigation, thin-clients, POS, and Human Machine Interface (HMI) applications.

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Canonical Joined The Khronos Group To Help Mir/Wayland Drivers

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Ubuntu

Canonical's specific involvement with the Khronos Group isn't listed and we haven't seen Canonical names closely associated with any major specs out of the different working groups to date. However, Oliver Ries, the Head of Engineering Product Strategy at Canonical, wrote into Phoronix that they joined the group for pushing their display server agenda with trying to work towards an underlying driver standard for Mir/Wayland. Oli noted in his email, "Canonical has joined Khronos in order to help establish the necessary driver standard that is required for Mir (and Wayland) to succeed. We have specifically contributed to the current standard proposal/draft."

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5 Kubernetes must-reads: Tips and trends

Kubernetes is having a moment – but don’t look for its popularity to wane anytime soon. As enterprises move beyond experimenting and start working in earnest with containers, the number of containers multiply: So do the manual chores. Orchestration tools like Kubernetes add automated help. “Running a few standalone containers for development purposes won’t rob your IT team of time or patience: A standards-based container runtime by itself will do the job,” Red Hat technology evangelist Gordon Haff recently noted. “But once you scale to a production environment and multiple applications spanning many containers, it’s clear that you need a way to coordinate those containers to deliver the individual services. As containers accumulate, complexity grows. Eventually, you need to take a step back and group containers along with the coordinated services they need, such as networking, security, and telemetry.” (See Haff’s full article, How enterprise IT uses Kubernetes to tame container complexity.) Read more

Australian Securities Exchange completes Red Hat migration

The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) has completed the migration of "mission-critical" legacy applications to the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). ASX first deployed JBoss EAP in 2011 to modernise its legacy technologies and to facilitate the introduction of new web applications after it realised its legacy application server platform was becoming increasingly inconsistent, unstable, and expensive. After the initial ASX Online Company migration was complete in 2012, ASX used JBoss EAP to build the ASX.com API, as well as its Sharemarket Game, which gives players the opportunity to learn how the share market works. Read more

Programming/Development: GAPID 1.0 and Atom 1.23

  • Diagnose and understand your app's GPU behavior with GAPID
  • GAPID 1.0 Released As Google's Cross-Platform Vulkan Debugger
    Back in March we wrote about GAPID as a new Google-developed Vulkan debugger in its early stages. Fast forward to today, GAPID 1.0 has been released for debugging Vulkan apps/games on Linux/Windows/Android as well as OpenGL ES on Android. GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and allows for analyzing rendering and performance issues with ease using its GUI interface. GAPID also allows for easily experimenting with code changes to see their rendering impact and allows for offline debugging. GAPID has its own format and capturetrace utility for capturing traces of Vulkan (or GLES on Android too) programs for replaying later on with GAPID.
  • Hackable Text Editor Atom 1.23 Adds Better Compatibility for External Git Tools
    GitHub released Atom 1.23, the monthly update of the open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor application loved by numerous developers all over the world. Including a month's worth of enhancements, Atom 1.23 comes with the ability for packages to register URI handler functions, which can be invoked whenever the user visits a URI that starts with "atom://package-name/," and a new option to hide certain commands in the command palette when registering them via "atom.commands.add." Atom 1.23 also improves the compatibility with external Git tools, as well as the performance of the editor by modifying the behavior of several APIs to no longer make callbacks more than once in a text buffer transaction. Along with Atom 1.23, GitHub also released Teletype 0.4.0, a tool that allows developers to collaborate simultaneously on multiple files.

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