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Ubuntu

Kubuntu 12.04 LTS and 13.10 Updated with KDE 4.13.2

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

“Packages for the release of KDE SC 4.13.2 are available for Kubuntu 12.04LTS, 13.10 and our development release. You can get them from the Kubuntu Backports PPA. Bugs in the packaging should be reported to kubuntu-ppa on Launchpad. Bugs in the software to KDE,” said the leader of the Kubuntu project, Jonathan Riddell.

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Debian 8.0 Jessie Testing Against Updated Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Debian
Ubuntu

Our latest Debian GNU/Linux benchmarks following the recent GNU/kFreeBSD vs. GNU/Linux comparison are benchmarks of Debian GNU/Linux in its latest testing form for 8.0 "Jessie" compared to a stock Ubuntu 14.04 LTS plus with an assortment of updates.

From the same Core i7 3960X Extreme Edition system with 8GB of RAM, 64GB OCZ Vertex solid-state drive, and Radeon HD 4850 graphics, the following configurations were benchmarked:

- Debian GNU/Linux "Testing" of 8.0 Jessie with the Linux 3.14 kernel, X.Org Server 1.15.1, Mesa 10.1.4, GCC 4.8.3, and the default EXT4 file-system. It's worth noting that with the Linux 3.14 kernel in Debian testing the i7-3960X EE system defaulted to the P-State scaling driver with the powersave governor.

- Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with the Linux 3.13 stock kernel, Mesa 10.1.0, X.Org Server 1.15.1, and an EXT4 file-system.

- Ubuntu 14.04 LTS updated to the Linux 3.15 mainline kernel (from the mainline PPA) that besides bumping the kernel version forward also switches over from the ACPI CPUfreq ondemand governor to the Intel P-State performance governor.

- The updated Ubuntu 14.04 LTS + Linux 3.15 stack plus enabling the Oibaf PPA for tapping Mesa 10.3.0-devel.

- The most updated stack (ditto above) plus pulling down the GCC 4.9 kernel onto Ubuntu 14.04 to replace GCC 4.8.

All of these Debian and Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were carried out via the Phoronix Test Suite benchmarking software.

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First impressions: Canonical Orange Box and Juju (Gallery)

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu

Inside the Orange Box, you'll find ten Intel micro-servers. Each is powered by Ivy Bridge i5-3427U CPUs. Every one of these mini-servers has four cores, Intel HD Graphics 4000, 16GBs of DDR3 RAM, a 128GB SSD root disk, and a Gigabit Ethernet port. The first micro-server also includes a Centrino Advanced-N 6235 Wi-Fi Adapter, and 2TB Western Digital hard drive. These are all connected in a cluster with a D-Link Gigabit switch.

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Has Samsung beaten Canonical at its own game?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Jack Wallen digs into the upcoming Samsung Tizen release to uncover how the mobile giant managed to beat Canonical to the Linux-phone punch.

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Prepare to Say Good Bye to Ubuntu 13.10 Saucy Salamander

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical is preparing to pull the plug on Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander), the operating system that was launched only nine months ago.

Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) was released on October 17, 2013 and the developers from Canonical have announced right from the start that they intend to only provide support for nine months.

This latest announcement finally corrects the support period for all the Ubuntu OSes. After Canonical switched from 18 months to 9 months of support, some unusual situations were created with the upgrade path, but now everything is in order...

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Make Ubuntu and Debian Look Windows 8 with a Single Click

Filed under
Microsoft
Debian
Ubuntu

There is no love between Linux and Windows users, but that doesn't stop Linux users to transform their operating system until it looks like the latest Windows 8. In fact, the WinAte theme is actually perfect for this task.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn Will Come With A Lot Of Changes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

As you may know, Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn will come with interesting changes. The integration of Qt 5.3 is almost done, but the developers still have to fix some known issues.

The developers hope to make Qt 5.3 available as default next week, due to the fact it has passed 99% of the tests.

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GTK+ Support Moves Along For Unity 8 On Mir

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Canonical developers have been making progress on allowing GTK+ applications to work natively atop Ubuntu's Unity 8 desktop with the Mir display server in place of the X.Org Server or even XMir for that matter.

Robert Ancell has blogged about the work he and Ryan Lortie have been working on recently for allowing GTK+ applications to run in Unity 8 with Mir. Using their out-of-tree patches, some GNOME/GTK+ applications are starting to work natively, but there's still many items to address like GTK+ full-screen applications, cursor changes, and much more.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Now Using Linux Kernel 3.15, Version 3.16 to Follow Soon

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Ubuntu

The Linux kernel is one of the most important packages in a distro and, in fact, it's essential to the OS. Most users won't actually feel the impact of a new kernel, but having the newest one possible is very important, if only for the improved hardware support.

The Ubuntu developers have already announced that they plan to integrate Linux kernel 3.16 in the final version of 14.10. That is a doable plan and they will be able to make it happen if nothing out of the ordinary occurs.

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Cognitive Dissonance

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is the distro people love to hate. That is ironic, as it’s spawned a larger number of currently forked distros than any other flavour of Linux. Just take a look at the GNU/Linux Distribution Timeline from futurist.se/gldt. It’s a truly nuts diagram of just how forked the Linux world has become. Totting up the currently live distros, Ubuntu is easily the most fertile with 70 forks. Debian and Red Hat have just over 60 each, and as for the total? We lost count after 280...

True, Ubuntu is a fork of Debian, but without the hard work of Canonical and its contributors I doubt those 70 distros would exist as forks of Debian. So I puzzle over the level of animosity that Canonical stirs in some sectors of the Linux community. The recent Debian debate on Systemd or Upstart generated a lot of noise against Upstart, but why would Canonical do anything but put Upstart forward as its primary choice? Why hate a company for putting its own developed project first?

Certainly, Canonical does make some odd decisions, but then many large companies do. Internal politics, lawyers, and the personal preferences of charismatic owners can sway decisions that look odd from the outside. That’s why this issue we’re going to fix Ubuntu. It’s the ideal time, too: the latest long term support release, 14.04 Trusty Tahr, is out, and you’ve likely installed it. So now’s the time to put right all those things that annoy you about Ubuntu. You can get started right now with this issue!

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