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Ubuntu

Debian and Ubuntu: debhelper, Ubuntu on USB, Test Weeks, Free Culture Showcase

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Build system changes in debhelper

    Since debhelper/11.2.1[1], we now support using cmake for configure and ninja for build + test as an alternative to cmake for configure and make for build + test. This change was proposed by Kyle Edwards in Debian bug #895044. You can try this new combination by specifying “cmake+ninja” as build system.

  • Run Ubuntu 18.04 From USB Stick

    Ubuntu 18.04 is a great operating system. It is in beta at the time of this writing. Everyone is so excited and eagerly waiting for its release even as we speak. If you’re one of them, you may wish to carry your favorite Linux distribution with you all the time. Have you ever thought about running Ubuntu 18.04 from a USB stick? Well it is possible. You can run Ubuntu 18.04 from a USB stick. That way your workstation is with you wherever you go. You don’t have to use other people’s setup, you can use your own comfortable setup, also your favorite softwares.

  • Ubuntu Developer Floats The Idea Of "Test Weeks" To Replace Early Alpha/Beta Releases

    Prominent Ubuntu community developer Simon Quigley has sparked a discussion about Ubuntu's release milestones and the possibility of moving away with their alpha and beta one milestones moving forward.

    Quigley's proposal after consulting with the Xubuntu / Ubuntu MATE / Kubuntu / Ubuntu Budgie teams was using "testing weeks" to replace the previous formal alpha / beta releases. During testing weeks, users would be encouraged to use the latest daily ISOs rather than a blessed "alpha" or "beta" image.

  • Announcing the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Free Culture Showcase winners

    In just under 3 weeks, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS launches. This exciting new release is a new Long Term Support release and will introduce many Ubuntu users to GNOME Shell and a closer upstream experience. In addition, Ubuntu developers have been working long and hard to ensure that 18.04 is a big, brilliant release that builds a bridge from 16.04 LTS to a better, bigger platform that can be built upon, without becoming unnecessarily boisterous.

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Upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 Beta From Ubuntu 17.10

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Ubuntu

This step-by-step tutorial demonstrates how to upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 Beta from Ubuntu 17.10.
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Important Kernel Update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Patches 39 Security Vulnerabilities

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Security
Ubuntu

After releasing a major kernel update for the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system series on both 64/32-bit and Raspberry Pi 2 devices, Canonical released an important kernel update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) systems.

The new kernel update published earlier this week addresses a total of 39 security vulnerabilities for the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series and its official derivatives, including Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio.

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Canonical Releases Major Linux Kernel Update for Ubuntu 17.10 for Raspberry Pi 2

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Ubuntu

Canonical released a major Linux kernel update for Ubuntu 17.10 for Raspberry Pi 2, addressing various security vulnerabilities that were previously patched for 64-bit and 32-bit architectures earlier this week.

The security advisory mentions a total of 21 security vulnerabilities fixed for linux-raspi2, the Linux kernel for Raspberry Pi 2 on Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating systems, including a race condition that could lead to a use-after-free vulnerability in Linux kernel's ALSA PCM subsystem, and a use-after-free vulnerability in the network namespaces implementation.

The update also addresses a race condition in Linux kernel's OCFS2 filesystem and loop block device implementations, as well as a null pointer dereference in the RDS (Reliable Datagram Sockets) protocol implementation. Most of these flaws could allow a local attacker to crash the vulnerable system by causing a denial of service or possibly execute arbitrary code.

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Xubuntu Zesty Aardvark upgrade

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Ubuntu

The Xubuntu upgrade process worked rather well. First, I was able to work around the Zesty EOL quirks, and that's an important one, but I expect Ubuntu (and friends) to offer a seamless GUI mechanism. Users should not have to wonder how to get an upgrade underway. Then, the actual upgrade was successful, especially considering I had an UKUU kernel, lots of third-party repos, and that all of this runs in a complex eight-boot UEFI configuration.

Post boot, we had a single error, but nothing after that. Smooth sailing. Good performance, Meltdown and microcode stuff notwithstanding, good hardware support, lots of nice programs and sweet looks all over the place. Fewer niggles than with Kubuntu 17.10, meaning the dev teams had time to polish all those beta-quality rough edges that were unleashed onto unsuspecting users. This leaves my Xubuntu instance ready and waiting for the LTS in April. That will be an interesting experience, I'm sure. But if you're wondering, you can safely attempt to update, and by now, Aardvark has reached a usable state, so you will have none of those tribulations like I did when I tested early on. Oh me, the sacrificial goat lover of the Linux world. Commence, brave people!

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Ubuntu: Ubuntu 18.04 Preparations

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04 Gives Nautilus a Striking New Look

    There’s a rather large visual change in Ubuntu 18.04 that I’ve only just noticed.

    It’s not because the change in question is subtle or easy to miss. It’s because I have only just booted up a copy of the Bionic Beaver thanks to the release of Ubuntu 18.04 beta 2.

  • Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS 'Bionic Beaver' Beta 2 now available

    Ubuntu Linux 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" is almost here -- it is due on April 26. In the interim, today, the second -- and final -- beta becomes available. Bionic Beaver is very significant, as it is an LTS version, meaning "Long Term Support." This is important to those that prefer stability to bleeding edge and don't want to deal with the hassle of upgrades. In other words, you can install 18.04 and be confident that it will be supported for 5 years. In comparison, non-LTS Ubuntu versions get a mere 9 months.

    There is plenty to be excited about with Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS 'Bionic Beaver' Beta 2, including the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment -- Beta 1 did not include GNOME at all. Of course, all the other DE flavors are available too, such as KDE and Xfce. The kernel is at 4.15, which while not the most current version, is still quite modern. Also included is LibreOffice 6.0 -- an essential tool that rivals Microsoft Office. Wayland is available as a technical preview, although X remains the default display server -- for now.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 Final Beta Available to Download

    USB thumb drives at the ready as the Ubuntu 18.04 beta download is now available for testing.

    This release marks the first official testing snapshot of what will become Ubuntu 18.04 LTS later this month.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Final Beta Released
  • Ubuntu Studio 18.04 Bionic Beaver Beta is released!

    The beta of the upcoming release of Ubuntu Studio 18.04 is ready for testing.

    You may find the images at cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntustudio/releases/bionic/beta-2/. More information can be found in the Beta Release Notes.

  • Ubuntu MATE 18.04 Beta 2

    We are preparing Ubuntu MATE 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) for distribution on April 26th, 2018 With this Beta pre-release, you can see what we are trying out in preparation for our next (stable) version.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Final Beta released

    The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the final beta release of the
    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Desktop, Server, and Cloud products.

    Codenamed "Bionic Beaver", 18.04 LTS continues Ubuntu's proud tradition
    of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a
    high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution.  The team has been hard
    at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

    This beta release includes images from not only the Ubuntu Desktop,
    Server, and Cloud products, but also the Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu
    Budgie, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu flavours.

    The beta images are known to be reasonably free of showstopper CD
    build or installer bugs, while representing a very recent snapshot of
    18.04 that should be representative of the features intended to ship
    with the final release expected on April 26th, 2018.

Ubuntu, Lubuntu and Xubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Final Beta Released, Available for Download Now

    Canonical released today the beta development version (a.k.a. Final Beta) of its upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, along with the second beta for opt-in flavors.

    While many of the opt-in Ubuntu flavors participated in last month's beta release, this is the first time Ubuntu 18.04 LTS gets a public beta build that users can actually download and install on their personal computers if they plan on becoming early adopters ahead of the official release later this month.

  • Lubuntu Bionic Beaver Final Beta has been released!

    Lubuntu Bionic Beaver Final Beta (soon to be 18.04) has been released!

    Thanks to the hard work of the Lubuntu team, we are pleased to announce the final beta!

  • Xubuntu 18.04 Community Wallpaper Contest Winners!

    The Xubuntu team are happy to announce the results of the 18.04 community wallpaper contest!

    We want to send out a huge thanks to every contestant; last time we had 92 submissions but now you all made us work much harder in picking the best ones out with a total of 162 submissions!

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Podcast. Dustin Kirkland Leaving, Nextcloud Box

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E05 – High Five - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Google Cloud Poaches Ubuntu's VP of Product

    After being at Canonical for a decade (aside from a brief stint at Gazzang), Dustin Kirkland who most recently served as the company's VP of Product, is joining Google.

    Dustin Kirkland managed the product teams for Ubuntu server, cloud, desktop and IoT the past five years while he's been an open-source developer since the late 90's and continues to maintain many Ubuntu packages himself. Dustin is a highly-skilled developer and manager while now he will be focusing his efforts on the Google Cloud.

  • The Nextcloud Box: a review of building an IoT device with snaps

    In 2016, Canonical, Nextcloud and WDLabs introduced the Nextcloud Box, the first IoT style device running with snaps out of the box. Besides sales of nearly 2K boxes before Western Digital shut down their research division WDLabs late last year, the snap been extremely popular with some days hitting over 10,000 downloads. Its installed base is estimated to be over 8000, making it a popular way to run a private cloud. Read our guest blog by Nextcloud’s Jos Poortvliet on to learn more about Nextcloud, the Box and how snaps help thousands of Nextcloud users keep their data under their control.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Community Theme, Ubuntu Server, LXD

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Ubuntu

Hands-On with System76's New Installer for Ubuntu-Based Pop!_OS Linux 18.04

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OS
Ubuntu

System76's engineers worked with the elementary OS team on the new Pop!_OS Linux installer, which is now finally available for public testing. Today we take a first look at the new graphical installer in Pop!_OS Linux 18.04, so we can show you how it stands compared to other GNU/Linux distributions.

Pop!_OS Linux 18.04 LTS is available to download only for 64-bit systems with either Intel/AMD or Nvidia GPUs. The live ISO images can be either installed on your local disk drive or used as is, directly from the bootable medium. When running the ISO, you'll first be asked to select the system language and keyboard layout.

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Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

  • The state of Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 is around the corner and I wanted to highlight what we did to make the Thunderbolt 3 experience as smooth as possible. Although this post focuses on Fedora 28 for what is currently packaged and shipping, all changes are of course available upstream and should hit other distributions in the future.
  • Thunderbolt 3 Support Is In Great Shape For Fedora 28
    Red Hat developers have managed to deliver on their goals around improving Thunderbolt support on the Linux desktop with the upcoming Fedora 28 distribution update. This has been part of their goal of having secure Thunderbolt support where users can authorize devices and/or restrict access to certain capabilities on a per-device basis, which is part of Red Hat's Bolt project and currently has UI elements for the GNOME desktop.

New Heptio Announcements

Android Leftovers

New Terminal App in Chome OS Hints at Upcoming Support for Linux Applications

According to a Reddit thread, a Chromebook user recently spotted a new Terminal app added to the app drawer when running on the latest Chrome OS Dev channel. Clicking the icon would apparently prompt the user to install the Terminal app, which requires about 200 MB of disk space. The installation prompt notes the fact that the Terminal app can be used to develop on your Chromebook. It also suggests that users will be able to run native apps and command-line tools seamlessly and securely. Considering the fact that Chrome OS is powered by the Linux kernel, this can only mean one thing. Read more