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Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) Enters Feature Freeze, Beta Available March 28th

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Ubuntu

As of February 21st, 2019, the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) operating system series has officially entered Feature Freeze phase, which means that no new features will be added to the upcoming release until its final release on April 18th. Ubuntu 19.04 will ship with the GNOME 3.32 desktop environment and Linux kernel 4.20.

Therefore, Canonical urges all Ubuntu developers and package maintainers to focus their efforts on fixing bugs instead of adding new features to the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) series, though exceptions are allowed as per https://wiki.ubuntu.com/FreezeExceptionProcess.

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Canonical Preps Emergency Point Releases for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS & Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Following on the footsteps of the Debian Project, which released the Debian GNU/Linux 9.7 point release for the stable Stretch series, which only contained a patched APT package manager, Canonical also wants to offer users a secure installation medium for deploying the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS operating systems.

"In the light of the recently discovered and fixed APT vulnerability, we have decided to re-build all our supported ISOs that could be potentially affected," said Lukasz Zemczak in a mailing list announcement on Friday. "We did not plan for another Xenial point-release but oh well, what can you do. Security is important."

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No! Ubuntu is NOT Replacing Apt with Snap

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Ubuntu

Don’t get what I am talking about? Let me give you some context.

There is a ‘blueprint’ on Ubuntu’s launchpad website, titled ‘Replace APT with snap as default package manager’. It talks about replacing Apt (package manager at the heart of Debian) with Snap ( a new packaging system by Ubuntu).

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Also: Full Circle Magazine #142

Tiny, $29 IoT gateway SBC packs in WiFi and dual LAN ports

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Linux
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec’s open-spec, 60 x 55.5mm “NanoPi R1” SBC runs mainline Linux on a quad -A7 Allwinner H3 and offers GbE and Fast Ethernet ports, WiFi/BT, 3x USB ports, and a standard metal case with antenna.

FriendlyElec has launched a hacker board aimed at low-cost IoT gateway duty. The open-spec, Linux-driven NanoPi R1 combines 10/100 and 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet ports along with 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0. The SBC runs FriendlyCore with Linux-4.14-LTS or OpenWrt on the Allwinner H3 SoC.

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Canonical Is Planning Some Awesome New Content For The Snap Store

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Ubuntu

There I was, thoughtfully drafting an article titled "3 Things Canonical Can Do To Improve The Snap Ecosystem," when I jumped on the phone with Evan Dandrea, an Engineering Manager who just so happens to be responsible for the Snapcraft ecosystem at Canonical. As it turns out, that headline will need a slight edit. One less number. That's because I've just learned Canonical has some ambitious plans for the future of the Snap Store.

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Improve Your Productivity With Ambient Noise in Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

ANoise aka Ambient Noise is an utility which plays various noises such as Rains, Fountains, thunderstorms, fire, sea, night etc. This constant and repeating sound helps general users, students to be more productive and concentrate on their work.

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It's Still Undecided Whether Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Will Support 32-bit x86 (i386)

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Hardware
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 17.10 dropped its i386 / 32-bit x86 installer image while the i386 port has remained part of the package archive. Other Ubuntu derivatives over the past year have also moved to drop their 32-bit installer images and with Lubuntu/Xubuntu now ending their ISOs for that port, it's hitting the end of the road. Now for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, there might not even be the i386 port.

Canonical's Steve Langasek has restarted the discussion about whether to include i386 for next year's Ubuntu 20.04 Long-Term Support release. Langasek commented today, "The real question is whether i386 is still supportable (and justifiable) as a release architecture at all in the 20.04 timeframe. There are significant technical concerns raised about whether we can continue to provide the expected security support for i386 over the lifetime of Ubuntu 20.04."

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Also: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 566

Ubuntu Studio: Updates for February 2019

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Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 19.04’s feature freeze quickly approaching, we would like to announce the new updates coming to Ubuntu Studio 19.04.

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Ubuntu-Centric Full Circle Magazine and Debian on the Raspberryscape

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #121
  • Debian on the Raspberryscape: Great news!

    I already mentioned here having adopted and updated the Raspberry Pi 3 Debian Buster Unofficial Preview image generation project. As you might know, the hardware differences between the three families are quite deep ? The original Raspberry Pi (models A and Cool, as well as the Zero and Zero W, are ARMv6 (which, in Debian-speak, belong to the armel architecture, a.k.a. EABI / Embedded ABI). Raspberry Pi 2 is an ARMv7 (so, we call it armhf or ARM hard-float, as it does support floating point instructions). Finally, the Raspberry Pi 3 is an ARMv8-A (in Debian it corresponds to the ARM64 architecture).

    [...]

    As for the little guy, the Zero that sits atop them, I only have to upload a new version of raspberry3-firmware built also for armel. I will add to it the needed devicetree files. I have to check with the release-team members if it would be possible to rename the package to simply raspberry-firmware (as it's no longer v3-specific).

    Why is this relevant? Well, the Raspberry Pi is by far the most popular ARM machine ever. It is a board people love playing with. It is the base for many, many, many projects. And now, finally, it can run with straight Debian! And, of course, if you don't trust me providing clean images, you can prepare them by yourself, trusting the same distribution you have come to trust and love over the years.

Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS Released with Linux Kernel 4.18 from Ubuntu 18.10, More

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Ubuntu

Initially planned for release on February 7th, 2019, the Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS operating system has been delayed by Canonical until Valentine's Day, February 14th, due to a bug in the Linux 4.18 kernel inherited from Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) causing boot failures with certain graphics chipsets.

The kernel regression was quickly addressed in the Linux 4.18 kernel package of both Ubuntu 18.10 and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS systems, so Canonical now released Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (Bionic Beaver) with updated graphics and kernel stacks from Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), as well as all the latest security and software updates.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS Now Available With The New HWE Stack

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Availability of GNOME 3.32 on GNU/Linux Distros

Following my Plasma 5.15 distros list, this is a list of GNOME 3.32 distros which are available as installation LiveCD. GNOME 3.32 has been released recently at 13 March 2019 and rapidly being made available into several GNU/Linux distros for desktop, either within the ISO or in the repository. At this moment, you can download any of Ubuntu 19.04 and Fedora Rawhide (for installable LiveCD), followed by openSUSE Tumbleweed, Debian Experimental, Manjaro GNOME, and Mageia 7 (by manually upgrading from respective repositories) in order to quickly test GNOME 3.32. However, please note that this is based on today's data and can be changed rapidly over time. I wish this list helps you. Go ahead, happy downloading, happy testing! Read more

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RaspEX Project Brings Kodi 18.1 and Linux Kernel 5.0 to Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Based on Debian GNU/Linux and Raspberry Pi's Raspbian operating systems, RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 is now available with the latest Kodi 18.1 "Leia" media center software featuring add-ons for watching Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, and Plex, as well as the lightweight LXDE desktop environment with VLC media player and NetworkManager. RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 is also powered by the latest and greatest Linux 5.0 kernel series, which apparently works very well with the recently launched Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ single-board computer. However, while Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is recommended for RaspEX, you can also install it on a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B or the older Raspberry Pi 2 Model B. Read more