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Ubuntu

A More Stable Future for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical has announced plans to switch all versions of Ubuntu to its new Snappy package manager. The new tool offers the promise of greater stability and security for the system and applications.
Snappy already is used in Ubuntu core, a minimal version of Ubuntu intended for use in the cloud, on mobile devices and in embedded systems.

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Ubunchu Is the Only Ubuntu Manga Out There and It's Quite Good

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu community is already spotting the operating systems in all kind of cool places, like NASA or The International Space station, but it looks like there is a Manga collection of comic books that details the adventures of Ubuntu users, usually trying to convince other people that it's a perfectly good system.

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A More Stable Future for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical has announced plans to switch all versions of Ubuntu to its new Snappy package manager. The new tool offers the promise of greater stability and security for the system and applications.

Snappy already is used in Ubuntu core, a minimal version of Ubuntu intended for use in the cloud, on mobile devices and in embedded systems.

The next step is rolling Snappy into "Ubuntu Desktop Next". Next is a special version of Ubuntu that acts as a test bed for new technology before it is included in the desktop version. Testers use Next to try out new features, such as Mir and Unity 8.

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Ubuntu Unity Vs Ubuntu GNOME

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

When I first started out with Linux I used Mandrake (later Mandriva, then Mageia) and then openSUSE and the desktop environment that I used was KDE.

The first time I tried GNOME was with Ubuntu 8.04 and for years this set the standard. In what was seen as a controversial move at the time Ubuntu switched from GNOME to Unity and GNOME seemed to be heading in a direction aimed at losing its loyal support base.

At first Unity was hated by nearly everybody but with the release of Ubuntu 12.04 many people could see the benefits.

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Lubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) to Finally Switch to LXQt

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Ubuntu

During the last day of Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS) for Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf), the Lubuntu development team discussed some of the upcoming features that will be implemented in the Lubuntu 15.10 Linux operating system.

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Ubuntu may beat Windows 10 to phone-PC convergence after all

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Despite the recent announcement that Windows 10 phones will be able to be used as PCs when connected to an external monitor, Ubuntu—the first operating system to toy with the idea—hasn’t conceded the smartphone-PC convergence race to Microsoft just yet.

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Also: Windows 10 or Ubuntu: Which will be the one OS to rule them all?

Ubuntu MATE 15.10 to Get MATE 1.10, New Welcome Screen, Integrated Launcher

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Ubuntu

During a very informative session at UOS (Ubuntu Online Summit) for Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) that took place today, May 7, Martin Wimpress had the great pleasure of informing us about the upcoming features of the Ubuntu MATE 15.10 operating system.

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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS to Use Systemd's Networkd Instead of Ifupdown

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Ubuntu

Today was the last day of the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS) event that took place online on the UbuntuOnAir channel on Google+ via YouToube live sessions, between May 5-7, and there were still some interesting discussions about the upcoming features of Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf).

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Voyager-X Will Take You on a New Xfce Journey

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Ubuntu

Voyager-X 10.14.4, released in March, is based on Xubuntu/Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin). This new Voyager-X is one of the first distros to use the new Xfce 4.12 desktop, more than one year in the making.

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Ubuntu MATE Is Now Available as Official Distro for Raspberry Pi 2

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE is now an official distribution for Raspberry Pi 2, and the images for this light and modern operating system are now listed on the website.

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More in Tux Machines

Google’s Fuchsia OS on the Pixelbook: It works! It actually works!

Google currently has two OSes on the market: Android and Chrome OS. The company is never one to leave a successful product alone in the marketplace, though, so it's also developing a third operating system called "Fuchsia." When we last checked in on the experimental OS in May 2017, calling it an "OS" was a bit of a stretch. We only got the system UI up and running on top of Android, where it then functioned like an app. The UI offered a neat multi-window system, but mostly it was just a bunch of placeholder graphics. Nothing worked. It has been hard to check in on Fuchsia since. The Fuchsia system UI, which was written with a cross-platform SDK called "Flutter," quickly shut down the Android (and iOS) compatible builds. Fuchsia has a Vulkan-based graphics stack, and no emulator supports the new-ish graphics API. The only way to get Fuchsia up and running again was with actual hardware, and the only supported devices were Intel NUC PCs from 2015 and the Acer Switch Alpha 12 laptop. Read more

today's howtos

Games: Super Blood Hockey, Starship Titanic and More

Software: MenuLibre, Speech Recognition, "Just TODO It", Slack

  • MenuLibre 2.1.4 Released
    The wait is over. MenuLibre 2.1.4 is now available for public testing and translations! With well over 100 commits, numerous bug fixes, and a lot of polish, the best menu editing solution for Linux is ready for primetime.
  • Speech Recognition For Linux Gets A Little Closer
    t has become commonplace to yell out commands to a little box and have it answer you. However, voice input for the desktop has never really gone mainstream. This is particularly slow for Linux users whose options are shockingly limited, although decent speech support is baked into recent versions of Windows and OS X Yosemite and beyond. There are four well-known open speech recognition engines: CMU Sphinx, Julius, Kaldi, and the recent release of Mozilla’s DeepSpeech (part of their Common Voice initiative). The trick for Linux users is successfully setting them up and using them in applications. [Michael Sheldon] aims to fix that — at least for DeepSpeech. He’s created an IBus plugin that lets DeepSpeech work with nearly any X application. He’s also provided PPAs that should make it easy to install for Ubuntu or related distributions.
  • Announcing "Just TODO It"
    Recently, I wished to use a trivially-simple TODO-list application whilst working on a project. I had a look through what was available to me in the "GNOME Software" application and was surprised to find nothing suitable. In particular I just wanted to capture a list of actions that I could tick off; I didn't want anything more sophisticated than that (and indeed, more sophistication would mean a learning curve I couldn't afford at the time). I then remembered that I'd written one myself, twelve years ago. So I found the old code, dusted it off, made some small adjustments so it would work on modern systems and published it.
  • Linux users can now get Slack as a snap package
    Canonical has announced the general availability of the collaboration platform Slack, as a snap package. The move will allow Linux users to get setup with the platform and begin collaborating on their work more easily. Any Linux distribution with snap support can head over to the snapcraft website, download the package, and begin using it.