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What would persuade you to ditch Windows for Ubuntu 10.04?

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Ubuntu

zdnet.com/blog: Well just to throw an additional spanner in the works, life-long Windows user though still the rampant Microsoft hater that I am, I have finally made the jump from Windows 7 - still a great operating system, to Ubuntu 10.04.

Ubuntu One has cool new features for maverick

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Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: Ubuntu One has many changes and new features planned for release alongside Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat this October. These new features such as Windows syncing and improvements to speed might be just the thing users are after!

Ubuntu 10.04.1 LTS released

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.04.1 LTS released
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Codename "Natty Narwhal" Release Schedule
  • Reasons to Love Ubuntu

Testdrive Let You Test Ubuntu With A Single Click

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Ubuntu
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: Test Drive is a package for Ubuntu that allows you to test drive the daily build of Ubuntu with little effort on the user side. With a single click, you can get the application to download the ISO from the web and run it in your virtual machine.

Next Ubuntu, 11.04, named Natty Narwhal

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Ubuntu

markshuttleworth.com: Allow me to introduce the Natty Narwhal, our mascot for development work that we expect to deliver as Ubuntu 11.04.

Using iSCSI On Ubuntu 10.04 (Initiator And Target)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Ubuntu 10.04. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling. To the iSCSI initiator, the remote storage looks like a normal, locally-attached hard drive.

Xubuntu 10.10: Becoming More Unique

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Ubuntu

workswithu.com: The upcoming release of Ubuntu 10.10 promises a variety of new features for Ubuntu’s desktop and server editions. But it will also bring significant changes for Ubuntu’s lightweight cousin, Xubuntu. Here’s a look.

Multi-touch Support Lands in Maverick

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Ubuntu
  • Multi-touch Support Lands in Maverick
  • shuttleworth: Gestures with multitouch in Ubuntu 10.10

Ubuntu Linux: I Like It, It Doesn't Like Me

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Ubuntu

zdnet.com: Like my colleague Jason Perlow, I quite like the Ubuntu Linux operating system. I use it as the operating system for my home server, and prefer it for server systems professionally, however

Lightweight Distro Roundup: Day 1 – Lubuntu

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Linux
Ubuntu

g33q.co.za: Day One of our Lightweight Distro Roundup. Our candidate? Lubuntu. Does it provide what is needed in a lightweight distro?

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4 things governments need to know to adopt open source cloud - Red Hat

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Open source key to preserving human history, argues Vatican

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