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Ubuntu

UbuTricks 14.10.22 Released with Support for 50 Apps

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Ubuntu

The number of applications has been increased to 50, with 13 more supported programs (11 apps and 2 games), including: CherryTree, Wine (PPA), DigiKam, Emacs, PeaZip and FLARE.

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Btrfs RAID HDD Testing On Ubuntu Linux 14.10

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

With the Btrfs file-system continuing to stabilize while still adding more functionality and is generating continued interest from more Linux distributions and other open-source projects, I've found it time to run some fresh Btrfs RAID benchmarks to see how the next-generation Linux file-system is performing with its built-in RAID handling.

The Btrfs file-system offers built-in support for RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, and RAID 10 (1+0) modes though the support for RAID 5/6 is still considered most experimental. Besides RAID, a single Btrfs file-system can span multiple devices to yield a larger file-system. In this basic Btrfs RAID benchmarking from Ubuntu 14.10, I used two identical hard drives and tested Btrfs without RAID and then in RAID 0 and RAID 1 modes. For a separate article I'm also working on a RAID 0/1/5/6/10 comparison using for solid-state drives, which should be much more interesting, so just take this article as an introduction.

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The Top Contributors To Mir Ahead Of Ubuntu 14.10

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Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 14.10 due for release tomorrow and the development branch of Mir at nearly 2,000 revisions, here's some quick Bazaar stats.

As of writing there's been 1994 revisions to the Mir Bazaar development-branch. Curious to see whether there's been any increase in outside contributions to the Mir display stack outside of Canonical, I ran bzr stats to glean some new statistics.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Linux 32-bit vs. 64-bit Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Given yesterday's story about Ubuntu 16.04 LTS potentially being the last 32-bit release if that proposal goes through, and given the number of people still running 32-bit Linux distributions on Intel/AMD hardware that is 64-bit capable, here's some fresh x86 vs. x86_64 benchmarks using Ubuntu 14.10.

Using Ubuntu 14.10 with the latest daily development ISOs today -- just ahead of this week's official Utopic Unicorn debut -- I did clean installs of both x86 and x86_64 flavors and carried out the same benchmarks with the same settings. Using the open-source Phoronix Test Suite automated benchmark framework made all testing easy and effortless.

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Ubuntu Used by FIA Weatherman at Suzuka F1 Grand Prix

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Linux
Ubuntu

One of the favorite pastimes of the Ubuntu community is to find interesting or weird places where this operating system is being used. There have been some strange sightings before and it's usually the last place where you would expect to find a Linux system. The same is true for Suzuka.

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Still running 32 bit Ubuntu?

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

I’m considering a proposal to have 16.04 LTS be the last release of Ubuntu with 32 bit images to run on 32 bit only machines (on x86 aka Intel/AMD only – this has no bearing on ARM). You would still be able to run 32 bit applications on 64 bit Ubuntu.

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OpenStack Juno is out, Debian (and Ubuntu Trusty ports) packages ready

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Debian
Ubuntu

This is just a quick announce: Debian packages for Juno are out. In fact, they were ready the day of the release, on the 16th of October. I uploaded it all (to Experimental) the same day, literally a few hours after the final released was git tagged. But I had no time to announce it.

This week-end, I took the time to do an Ubuntu Trusty port, which I also publish (it’s just a mater of rebuilding all, and it should work out of the box). Here are the backports repositories. For Wheezy:

deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian juno-backports main

deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian juno main

For trusty:

deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian trusty-juno-backports main

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Ubuntu Touch RTM Update Is Out, Has Better Performance and Beautiful New Indicators

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu developers had some minor problems in the week before with all sorts of bugs that were popping out. They postponed the release of a new update for the Ubuntu Touch RTM and, at one point, they even got everyone to focus on fixing the problems and nothing else. Now they have a new version out and progress really shows.

Users who already have Ubuntu Touch on their phones might have noticed that the number of features added to the system have diminished drastically, but that's the way it should be. The system is getting closer to its final stages and there is little reason to add new options now. The current form of the OS is not very far from the official release, so only fixes remain to be made.

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Ubuntu turns 10: A look back at desktop Linux standard bearer

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Ubuntu

Tech pundits differ, to say the least, on a lot of topics in the world of free and open-source software, but it’s inarguable that Ubuntu has been the most influential Linux desktop distribution of the past decade. On the occasion of its 10th anniversary, here’s a brief look back.

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V is for Vivid

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Ubuntu

Release week! Already! I wouldn’t call Trusty ‘vintage’ just yet, but Utopic is poised to leap into the torrent stream. We’ve all managed to land our final touches to *buntu and are excited to bring the next wave of newness to users around the world. Glad to see the unicorn theme went down well, judging from the various desktops I see on G+.

And so it’s time to open the vatic floodgates and invite your thoughts and contributions to our soon-to-be-opened iteration next. Our ventrous quest to put GNU as you love it on phones is bearing fruit, with final touches to the first image in a new era of convergence in computing. From tiny devices to personal computers of all shapes and sizes to the ventose vistas of cloud computing, our goal is to make a platform that is useful, versal and widely used.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.