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Ubuntu

So a Man Walks Into a Bar and Asks for an Ubuntu on the Rocks

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

ibeentoubuntu.com: She was checking out laptop bags, and my attention went to the Acer display just outside the bag store. To my shock, there was a low-end laptop (about USD400) with a localized version of Ubuntu on the computer.

The Future Of Ubuntu Software Center

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Software Center (initially Ubuntu Software Store) was released with Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala and it currently has only a few of the features it was designed for, being just stage 1 out of 4.

Why do I use Ubuntu?

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Ubuntu

scottnesbitt.net: Because it works. Yes, it’s that simple. Because. It. Works. Case in point:

Lucid Alpha 1 – Fewer Games, Installer Changes, Impatient Friendly

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Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Alpha 1 was released late last week and although very little cosmetically has changed, we’ve pointed out the obvious changes below.

Why I Use Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

diffperspective.wordpress: A former student of mine noticed that my laptop looked different. Well, maybe not the laptop itself, but the user interface. She immediately inquired how I “did that” while she pointed at the screen of my Thinkpad.

Netbook screen too small? Not for this Linux software

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Ubuntu

blog.syracuse.com: I love my little “netbook” laptop computer, barely the size of a small hardcover book. But running programs on it turned out to be more frustrating than I’d imagined. Why not take Windows off my netbook and replace it with Linux, just like I’d done with the old laptop?

30 reasons why Ubuntu is here to stay

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Ubuntu

ubuntugeek.com: I’ve been using Ubuntu since version 5.04, in 2006. Since then it has only gotten better. Here is why I think Ubuntu excels in many points.

Virtual Users/Domains With Postfix, Courier, MySQL, SquirrelMail (Ubuntu 9.10)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I'll also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses. The resulting Postfix server is capable of SMTP-AUTH and TLS and quota. Passwords are stored in encrypted form in the database. In addition to that, this tutorial covers the installation of Amavisd, SpamAssassin and ClamAV so that emails will be scanned for spam and viruses. I will also show how to install SquirrelMail as a webmail interface so that users can read and send emails and change their passwords.

Ubuntu backup awesomeness

Filed under
Ubuntu
Humor

shanefagan.com: Twas a night before Christmas it was the 12th to be exact at 3 am beside my computer I did sat. My ubuntu did stall, I had pondered and pondered and did a fresh install. Swiftly I got to the the manual partition, then suddenly I had a fine apparition.

What will Ubuntu 10.04 bring to the table?

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Ubuntu

ghacks.net: It’s almost that time again – time to start chatting up the next release coming out of the Ubuntu-verse. I know, I know…it seems the tires of 9.10 were just kicked. They were. But what should be expected of Ubuntu?

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The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Open source is not dead

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source. Read more

10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

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