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Ubuntu

An Intel-Based Ubuntu Touch Tablet Is Planning To Launch Soon

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Ubuntu

Today we've received some information a device dubbed the "UT One" that is an Ubuntu Touch tablet powered by an Intel Bay Trail processor and aims to ship in December.

According to the information we've been supplied, the UT One is going to launch in late November for pre-ordering with hopes of shipping by late December. The Ubuntu Touch tablet is based around an Intel Atom Z3735D "Bay Trail" SoC that's quad-core with 1.33GHz base frequency and 1.5GHz turbo frequency. The Intel Z3735D features Intel HD "Gen7" graphics like the other Bay Trail (formerly "Valley View") designs.

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Ubuntu's Unity 8 desktop removes the Amazon search 'spyware'

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Ubuntu

Unity 8, seen in the Ubuntu Desktop Next images and Ubuntu Touch phones, removes a controversial feature branded “spyware” by some and fixes one of Ubuntu’s most long-standing complaints. When Unity 8 is stable and ready, Ubuntu won’t send your local searches over the web and show you Amazon product results anymore, quelling some longstanding fears in the open-source community.

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UBUNTU DEVELOPER TOOLS CENTER 0.1 RELEASED WITH ECLIPSE AND ANDROID ADT SUPPORT

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Ubuntu

A couple of months ago, Canonical released Ubuntu Developer Tools Center (UDTC), a project to "enable quick and easy setup of common developers needs on Ubuntu".

In the release announcement, Didier Roche, Software Engineer at Canonical, mentioned that for now, Canonical is focusing on Android developers, but more will follow, like Go developers, web developers, Dart and more.

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Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) Feature Wishlist for a Great Release

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Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) out of the way, Canonical has started working on Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet), but it remains to be seen just how different it's going to be. We put together a list of features that would be nice to have and that could be technically implemented.

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Introducing the Canonical Distribution of Ubuntu OpenStack – your “autopilot” for rapid, customised OpenStack private cloud deployment and management

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Linux
Ubuntu

Based on Canonical’s industry-leading OpenStack reference architecture and building on Ubuntu’s leading position as the most widely used OpenStack platform, the Canonical Distribution gives users the widest range of commercially-supported vendor options for storage, software-defined networking and hypervisor from Canonical and its OpenStack partners. It then automates the creation and management of a reference OpenStack based on those choices.

“The Canonical Distribution of Ubuntu OpenStack is a complete autopilot for your private cloud,” said Mark Shuttleworth. “Point it at a rack or ten and tell it your preferences for storage, software defined network, and hypervisor, and it will create your cloud automatically, manage and monitor it for you, keep it fully secure, and update it to the next version of OpenStack in due course. This is the solution for people who want a high-performance reference cloud and want to focus on their own applications and workloads rather than the underlying infrastructure.”

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Ubuntu Survey Results Show Unity, Heron’s and Dual-Boots Are Popular

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Ubuntu

Kicking off our ‘Ubuntu at Ten Reader Survey’ was an obvious question: which version of Ubuntu served as your entry point. This aimed to find out the most popular ‘jump on’ point.

Unsurprisingly the majority of first timers came by way of an LTS release. Ubuntu 8.04 LTS, Ubuntu 6.06 LTS and Ubuntu 10.04 LTS being the most common “jump on points” for respondents. This was followed by Ubuntu 4.10 (Warty Warthog; the very first release) and Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn).

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Canonical Splits Ubuntu Touch RTM and Ubuntu Touch Vivid Vervet

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Ubuntu

The main focus for Canonical right now is the Ubuntu Touch operating system scheduled to show up on phones and in shops in a couple of months. The recent Ubuntu 14.10 launch and the start of the Ubuntu 15.04 development cycle has complicated things a little for the developers.

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10+ Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn

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Ubuntu

There is some discussion of whether or not you should upgraded to 14.10 here, but the short version is, for most people an upgrade from 14.04 is not necessary but not a bad idea, and an upgrade from any earlier version is a very good idea. Mostly, though, you should just upgrade.

One could ask the question, should you be installing Ubuntu with Unity. You have to like Unity. I personally like to have a wider range of desktop options than Ubuntu with Unity allows, but for a notebook or laptop where you are going to be using one application at a time, usually use GUI apps, and like to have your computer integrated fairly seamlessly to social networking services, etc., it is a good option.

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Ubuntu's shiny 10th birthday Unicorn: An upgrade fantasy

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Reviews
Ubuntu

I've been covering Ubuntu for seven of the release’s 10 years and 14.10 is the first time I've had to dig deep into the release notes just to find something new to test.

If you needed further proof that Canonical is currently solely focused on bringing its Unity 8 interface to mobile devices, 14.10 is the best evidence yet.

Almost nothing Canonical develops has changed in this release - there isn't even a new desktop wallpaper. There are some updates to be sure, but they don’t hail from Canonical. Point release updates for default GNOME apps are included, as is a new kernel, the latest version of Mesa, and some other underlying tools.

The lack of updates isn't unexpected, in fact that's been the plan all along.

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Ubuntu Kylin 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Consolidates Its Position in China

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Kylin 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn), a Chinese Linux distribution based on Ubuntu and developed in collaboration with Canonical, is looking to expand its user-base in China with this new release.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Is there need for Red Hat Certification training in Zimbabwe?
    A local institution is investigating the need to train Systems Administrators/Engineers who use Linux towards Red Hat certifications. The course is targeted at individuals with at least 2 years experience using Linux.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) By The Numbers: Valuation in Focus
  • Fedora @ Konteh 2017 - event report
    This year we managed to get a booth on a very popular student job fair called Konteh. (Thanks to Boban Poznanovic, one of the event managers)
  • Fedora 26 Alpha status is NO-GO
    The result of the second Fedora 26 Alpha Go/No-Go Meeting is NO-GO. Due to blockers found during the last days [1] we have decided to delay the Fedora 26 Alpha release for one more week. There is going to be one more Go/No-Go meeting on the next Thursday, March 30th, 2017 at 17:00 UTC to verify we are ready for the release.
  • Fedora 26 Alpha Faces Another Delay
    Fedora 26 was set back by a delay last week and today it's been delayed again for another week. Fedora 26 Alpha has been delayed for another week when at today's Go/No-Go meeting it was given a No-Go status due to outstanding blocker bugs.

GNOME News: Gtef, GNOME 3.24 Release Video, Epiphany 3.24

  • Gtef 2.0 – GTK+ Text Editor Framework
    Gtef is now hosted on gnome.org, and the 2.0 version has been released alongside GNOME 3.24. So it’s a good time for a new blog post on this new library.
  • GNOME's GTK Gets Gtef'ed
    Developer Sébastien Wilmet has provided an overview of Gtef with this text editing framework having been released in tandem with GNOME 3.24. Gtef provides a higher level API to make it easier for text editing or in developer-focused integrated development environments.
  • The Official GNOME 3.24 Release Video Is Here
    By now you’re probably well aware that a new update to the GNOME desktop has been released — and if you’re not, where’ve you been?! GNOME 3.24 features a number of neat new features, welcome improvements, and important advances, most of which we’ve documented in blog posts during the course of this week.
  • A Web Browser for Awesome People (Epiphany 3.24)
    Are you using a sad web browser that integrates poorly with GNOME or elementary OS? Was your sad browser’s GNOME integration theme broken for most of the past year? Does that make you feel sad? Do you wish you were using an awesome web browser that feels right at home in your chosen desktop instead? If so, Epiphany 3.24 might be right for you. It will make you awesome. (Ask your doctor before switching to a new web browser. Results not guaranteed. May cause severe Internet addiction. Some content unsuitable for minors.)

today's howtos

AMDGPU Vega Patches and AMD Open-Sources Code

  • More AMDGPU Vega Patches Published
    Less than one week after AMDGPU DRM Vega support was published along with the other Vega enablement patches for the Linux driver stack, more Direct Rendering Manager patches are being shot out today.
  • AMD have announced 'Anvil', an MIT-licensed wrapper library for Vulkan
    AMD are continuing their open source push with 'Anvil' a new MIT-licenses wrapper library for Vulkan. It's aim is to reduce the time developers spend to get a working Vulkan application.
  • AMD Open-Sources Vulkan "Anvil"
    While waiting for AMD to open-source their Vulkan Linux driver, we have a new AMD open-source Vulkan project to look at: Anvil. Anvil is a project out of AMD's GPUOpen division and aims to be a wrapper library for Vulkan to make it easier to bring-up new Vulkan applications/games. Anvil provides C++ Vulkan wrappers similar to other open-source Vulkan projects while also adding in some extra features.