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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 15.04 Gets an Update to Fix a Dnsmasq Vulnerability

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Ubuntu

Canonical has published details in a security notice about a Dnsmasq vulnerability in Ubuntu 15.04, Ubuntu 14.10, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, that has been found and fixed.

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Bq Aquaris e4.5 Ubuntu Edition Has Hidden Factory Mode

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Ubuntu

The Bq Aquaris e4.5 Ubuntu Edition has been out for some time and is available for purchase right now. It's the only Ubuntu phone on sale, and one of the users found out how to access a hidden Factory Mode that gives access to all kinds of cool stuff.

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Mark Shuttleworth Says Microsoft Didn't Copy Convergence Idea, Ubuntu Will Be First

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Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth talked about Ubuntu convergence and he also happened to mention the fact that Microsoft is trying to do something similar to Windows, but he said that the companies just had the same idea, at the same time.

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Ubuntu Devs and Users Talk About Windows with Buttons on the Wrong Side

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu community is having a vivacious discussion regarding the placement of the window buttons on the left side. From the looks of it, some users would prefer to have the option of moving the buttons to the right side.

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Ubuntu 15.04 review: Beauty or “boring” is in the eye of the beholder

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Snow melts and trees blossom, but nothing really says spring around the Ars Orbital HQ like the arrival of a new version of Ubuntu Linux. Right on schedule, Canonical has recently released Ubuntu 15.04, also known as Vivid Vervet.

Ubuntu 15.04 arrived in late April and has, judging by other reviews, largely underwhelmed. According to the popular storyline, there's not much new in 15.04. Of course, a slew of changes and unforeseen features in 15.04 could have just as easily earned a negative reaction, probably from the same people calling the actual release boring. The top of the Linux mountain is a lonely, criticism-strewn place.

The truth is, this line of thought is partially correct. There isn't much new in 15.04, at least not in terms of visible changes to the Unity desktop.

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Relax, it's just Ubuntu 15.04. AARGH! IT'S FULL OF SYSTEMD!!!

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Ubuntu

Most users will notice very little overall difference in this latest Ubuntu release, but it’s this change that packs the biggest punch.

There are a couple of new things that make 15.04 worth the upgrade from previous versions, but the really big changes – like the move to Unity 8 and the whole "convergence" of the desktop and mobile versions – remain in the future.

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Ubuntu Is Slowly Moving Towards the Rolling Release Model

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Ubuntu

Developers from Canonical explained last week that they intended to rebase the Ubuntu Next flavor (featuring Mir and Unity8) on Snappy, which means that they were also considering moving to a rolling release model, even if it was just for this branch.

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Next Ubuntu Codename Announced, New Laptops

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Ubuntu
-s

Ubuntu dominated the headlines today with its Ubuntu Online Summit for 2015 beginning today. Mark Shuttleworth gave the keynote and informed a loyal public of the new 15.10 lsb_release -a. Elsewhere, Ubuntu 15.04 gets a thumbs-up and Ebuyer.com is now selling Ubuntu laptops.

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Chromixium – An Ubuntu Based Google’s Chrome OS Clone

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Google
Reviews
Ubuntu

Today, We have come up with an interesting news for both Ubuntu and Chrome OS users. Meet Chromixium – the new modern desktop operating system based on Ubuntu that has the functionality, look and feel of Google’s “Chrome OS”. Chromixium has brought the elegant simplicity of Chromebook and flexibility and stability of Ubuntu together. Chromixium puts the web front and center of the user experience. Web and Chrome apps work straight out of the browser to connect you to all your personal, work and education networks. Sign into Chromium to sync all your apps and bookmarks. When you are offline or when you need more power, you can install any number of applications for work or play, including LibreOffice, Skype, Steam and a whole lot more. Security updates are installed seamlessly and effortlessly in the background and will be supplied until 2019. You can install Chromixium in place of any existing operating system, or alongside Windows or Linux.

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BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review: A promising start

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The first 'production' smartphone running the Ubuntu operating system is finally here. Designed and marketed by the Spanish company BQ (not to be confused with the Chinese company BQ Mobile) and made in China, the first Ubuntu Phone is based on the 4.5-inch BQ Aquaris E4.5, which normally ships with Android 4.4. Included with the BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition are two copies of the quick-start guide (in four languages each, one of the eight being English), a charger (with a built-in two-pin continental mains plug) and a 1-metre USB-to-Micro-USB cable. A comprehensive User Manual is available for download from the BQ website. The list price for the Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition, which is only available in the EU, is €169.90 (~£125).

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Also: Ubuntu and Windows set to contest desktop/smartphone hybrid market

Ubuntu phone that works as a desktop PC coming in 2015

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • How a Linux stronghold turned back to Windows: Key dates in Munich's LiMux project [Ed: This explains the progression of Microsoft's war on GNU/Linux, typically using proxies]
    The project is temporarily put on hold while a study investigates whether it could be derailed by software patents.
  • End of an open source era: Linux pioneer Munich confirms switch to Windows 10 [Ed: Microsoft paid (bribed) all the right people, got a Microsoft fan -- by his own admission -- in power, gifted him for this]
    Mayor Dieter Reiter said there's never been a unified Linux landscape in the city. "We always had mixed systems and what we have here is the possibility of going over to a single system. Having two operating systems is completely uneconomic.
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E38 – Soft Knowledgeable Burn
    This week we refactor a home network, discuss how gaming on Linux has evolved and grown in recent years, bring you a blend of love and go over your feedback.
  • Live ISOs for Slackware-current 20171122
    I have released an update of the ‘liveslak‘ scripts. I needed the tag for a batch of new ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. These are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Wed Nov 22 05:27:06 UTC 2017“) i.e. yesterday and that means, the ISOs are going to boot into the new 4.14.1 kernel.
  • Am I willing to pay the price to support ethical hardware?
    The planned obsolescence is even worse with tablets and smartphones, whose components are all soldered down. The last tablet with a removable battery was the Dell Venue 11 Pro (Haswell version) announced in October 2013, but it was an expensive Windows device that cost as much as a mid-range laptop. The last Android tablet with a removable battery was the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (GT-N8000 series), released in August 2012. It is still possible to find mid-range smartphones with removable batteries. Last year the only high end phones with removable batteries were the LG G5 and V20, but even LG has given up on the idea of making phones that will last longer than 2 years once the battery starts to degrade after roughly 500 full charge and discharge cycles. Every flagship phone introduced in 2017 now has its battery sealed in the case. According to the gmsarena.com database, the number of new smartphone models with non-replaceable batteries grew from 1.9% in 2011 to 26.7% in 2014, and now to 90.3% in 2017. It is highly likely that not a single model of smartphone introduced next year will have a replaceable battery.

More Coverage of New Lumina Release

  • Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Released
    The TrueOS BSD folks working on their Qt5-powered Lumina Desktop Environment have issued a new feature update of their open-source desktop.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.4.0 Released
    Lumina 1.4.0 carries a number of changes, optimisations, and feature improvements. Lumina is the default desktop of TrueOS, a BSD-based operating system. The desktop itself is lightweight, modular, built using Qt, and uses Fluxbox for window management. Although Lumina is mostly aimed at BSD users it also runs on Linux, including Fedora, Arch and — *mario coin sfx* — Ubuntu.

today's howtos