Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Dynamic Ubuntu Theme

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Dynamic Ubuntu Theme that changes depending on the time
  • Ubuntu forgets to add new system sounds for Lucid
  • Adventures with Ubuntu Karmic Koala

Running Alpha Lucid on the Dell T7500

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

redmonk.com/sogrady: Dell shipped me a loaner top of the line workstation to test, the Dell Precision T7500. I’ll have more on what, specifically, the machine is for later. For now, a quick rundown on the specs, setup and software choices.

Why Metacity Window Buttons on Left in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

The default position of the window controls will remain the left, throughout beta1. We're interested in data which could influence the ultimate decision. There are good reasons both for the change, and against them, and ultimately the position will be decided based on what we want to achieve over time.

Rest here

An adventure with an HP printer/scanner and Ubuntu

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

tenshu.net: For a while now I’ve been thinking about some ideas for a project that will require a scanner. No problem you think, scanners of various kinds have been supported in Linux for a long time.

QA with Matt Asay: How Linux is Beating Apple and Much More

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

linux.com: Matt took some time recently to share his perspective with me on why Canonical can take Linux places Red Hat can't, how Linux beats Apple, and how the Ubuntu community's passion and focus on design will change the way people see Linux for a long time.

Ubuntu Without a Human Face

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Without a Human Face
  • Shuttleworth: 2 year cadence: some progress
  • 6 Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Wallpapers

Shuttleworth heir opens up on Ubuntu biz

Filed under
Ubuntu

theregister.co.uk: When you have Mark Shuttleworth as your backer, as commercial Linux distributor Canonical does, it is a bit like having money in the bank when the bank also believes fervently in your cause.

The new Ubuntu look

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.techrepublic.com: Recently it was reported that Ubuntu 10.4 was going to ship with a snazzy new GTK theme that would, by default, enable transparency to bring the Ubuntu GNOME desktop on par with the modern look of, say, Windows 7.

That’s not bloated, that’s clinically obese

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: The biggest surprise (shock?) to me was the stark contrast between performance with only 256Mb of memory, and performance with 512Mb. I tease the Gnome crowd a lot for being chubby, but that’s not overweight, that’s clinical obesity.

An insight into wrangles in the Ubuntu community

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: In a recent interview given to the Ubuntu community site, the fridge, Melissa Draper said "There's some odd politics going on and I've been pushed away from a few things within Ubuntu lately."

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Canonical’s “Snappy Ubuntu” Lands On AWS

Canonical’s stripped down “Snappy” edition of Ubuntu Core is now available on Amazon’s AWS cloud computing platform. If you’ve followed along over the last few weeks, that’s not a major surprise. Snappy first launched on Microsoft Azure at the beginning of this month and then arrived on Google’s Compute Engine platform earlier this week. It was pretty obvious that AWS’s EC2 would be next. Read more

Public Interest, Software Freedom and Open Standards

...importance of working with upstream projects and initiatives for a government like the UK Government. [...] Public interest and software freedom are not always aligned, in the sense that software freedom grant rights to users of Free Software but does not imply users will get what they want; in this case however, these two notions could become very much aligned. The same holds true for Open Standards: if major chunks of the UK’s public sector’s pool of documents is migrated to ODF, there is something close to a liability – and an opportunity- for this Government to ensure the format continues to thrive and be improved. Read more

Defending the Free Linux World

Co-opetition is a part of open source. The Open Invention Network model allows companies to decide where they will compete and where they will collaborate, explained OIN CEO Keith Bergelt. As open source evolved, "we had to create channels for collaboration. Otherwise, we would have hundreds of entities spending billions of dollars on the same technology." Read more

And the best distro of 2014 is ...

Looking back at my 2013 summary, I just realized I'm a bloody prophet. I wanted openSUSE to make a nice comeback, and it did. And I wanted Fedora to shine, and it did, and it's version 20 no less. The utter and total dominance of the Ubuntu family has been shattered, and this is a very good thing. Competition is always good. What about Mint, you ask? Well, Linux Mint behaved splendidly, but this year, the few spins I tried weren't as sharp and spectacular as what we saw in 2013. Not necessarily a bad thing, but the best-of is more than just a list of grades. It also packs an emotional element, a surprise element, as well as the overall combination of what the selected distributions have achieved with their given parameters. For instance, CentOS is not supposed to be a desktop system, so when it does that well, it's more interesting than similar results with the stock Ubuntu family members and cousins. Hence, this list and its players. Of course, this is entirely my private, subjective observation, but I think it fits the global shift in the Linux field. With the Mir vs Wayland game, a big delay in Ubuntu Edge, and a general cooling off in the distro space, seeing more effort from outside the Ubuntu range is only natural. And welcome. That said, the big winner is still Trusty, and it shows that even though some years may be rougher than others, Ubuntu has its merit and cannot be easily disregarded, no matter how we feel, or want to feel, even if purely on a reactionary basis. And to prove us all wrong, Canonical has baked a phenomenal LTS release, which should bring much joy and fun to Linux users worldwide for years to come. I hope you've liked this compilation. See you next year. Read more