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Ubuntu

Keryx: Offline Package Manager For Ubuntu / Debian

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Ubuntu

Keryx is a portable, open source and cross-platform package manager for APT-based (Ubuntu, Debian) systems. It provides a graphical interface for gathering updates, packages, and dependencies for offline computers.

Ultimate Edition Linux 2.5

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Linux
Ubuntu

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Some Linux distros sell themselves by being minimalistic. They only come with a limited range of apps and everything is geared toward keeping the file size and hardware requirements absolutely minimal. Then there’s Ultimate Edition 2.5. Ultimate Edition leans the other way and throws in everything including the kitchen sink.

Ubuntu Spotted on Doctor Who Set

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Ubuntu

popey.com: After watching the two Doctor Who Christmas episodes I thought I’d watch the ‘behind the scenes’ programme ‘Doctor Who Confidential’. During one segment where they discuss the set used in the Christmas episode I spotted a bunch of machines with what look like Ubuntu boot screens on them.

My Mom uses Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

ubuntuliving.blogspot: I don't quite know how it happened, but my parents finally got the Internet / computing bug. Last year, my Dad bought a Dell Studio and my Mom bought an HP Mini. Slowly, my two senior citizens have been getting the hang of things.

Samsung NC10 – a pleasant Ubuntu experience

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Hardware
Ubuntu

lynxworks.eu: Restricted to what PC World stocks, it came down to three choices – Acer 531, Samsung NC10 or Toshiba NB200. The NB200 dropped of their stock list sometime between Christmas and New Year and they only had the NC10 in stock when I got to the store so I guess that narrowed it down.

A console-only Ubuntu system

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Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpres: It’s been a long time since I built a command-line system in Ubuntu — possibly over a year — and it seems like a lot of things have changed in that time. But that's not a bad thing.

full circle magazine: A new year, a new decade, and a new issue

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Ubuntu

It’s new year’s for most of the world. Not only is it a new year, it’s a new decade full of promises for the computing world and the world at large. I hope you’ve enjoyed our foray into Ubuntu and Linux for the past few years. Here’s to many more!

Ubuntu 32-bit, 32-bit PAE, 64-bit Kernel Benchmarks

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Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Coming up in our forums was a testing request to compare the performance of Linux between using 32-bit, 32-bit PAE, and 64-bit kernels. We decided to compare the performance of the 32-bit, 32-bit PAE, and 64-bit kernels on a modern desktop system and here are the results.

SuperOS: Like Ubuntu But Easier

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Ubuntu

beginlinux.com: One problem I run into a lot when recommending Ubuntu to complete Linux newbies is they aren't used to installing codecs or using the terminal when they want to play DVDs, MP3s and other file types. This is what has led me to Super Ubuntu or SuperOS as it's now called.

Ubuntu and Mozilla: The inevitable alliance

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Moz/FF
Ubuntu

buntfu.com: First we have Mozilla which showed the world that the browser wars were not over and that Microsoft can be hurt. Second is Ubuntu which showed the world that Linux can be viable. Finally lets look at Google.

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Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Open source is not dead

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source. Read more

10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

Software-defined networking (SDN) is emerging as one of the fastest growing segments of open source software (OSS), which in itself is now firmly entrenched in the enterprise IT world. SDN simplifies IT network configuration and management by decoupling control from the physical network infrastructure. Read more