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Ubuntu

Private file and mail server gizmo runs Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

OpenProducts is prepping an Ubuntu-based private file and email server called OPI with LUKS-based microSD encryption, and optional USB or cloud backup.

Like Sher.ly’s recently announced Sherlybox, the OpenProducts OPI device runs Linux, and is intended to enable a private cloud controlled solely by the user. While the Sherlybox is more of a network attached storage (NAS) device with optional onboard storage, OPI is a multifaceted, secure server that offers NAS-like access to external storage. Unlike the Lima device, which depends on USB storage, OPI instead uses encrypted microSD storage.

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The Calculator, Calendar And Music Applications, Part Of The Ubuntu Touch Core Apps Have Received Support For The Click Store

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Ubuntu

According to Alan Pope, one of the Ubuntu developers, The Calendar, Calculator and Music applications, part of the Ubuntu Touch Core Apps have received support for the Click Store, meaning that this apps can be easily kept up to date via the Click Store update manager, without needing a second developer to authorize the process.

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Ubuntu MATE Flavor Could Arrive Soon, Prototype Looks Great Already

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu distribution features numerous flavors, like KDE, Xfce, and LXDE, but not all the major desktop environments are used. It looks like a new one is brewing, based on MATE.

Ever since the introduction of Unity, some of the Ubuntu users have been pining after GNOME 2, the desktop environment in use until Ubuntu 11.04 arrives. It looks like it had a lot of fans and a part of the Linux community is still hoping that the good days will return.

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Canonical to Release an RTM Version of Ubuntu for Phones

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Touch development has been powering on for the last year and a half, and Canonical has made great progress. The Ubuntu for phones operating system has been separated in a number of branches, and one of them is considered stable.

From time to time, the Ubuntu devs promote an image that passes all the internal tests to the stable branch but, for a mass release of the system, the OS will have to be much better.

That is the reason why the technical lead for the Foundations Team, Colin Watson, made a very interesting proposition regarding a new Ubuntu Touch version that will be designated RTM (release-to-manufacture).

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Canonical Officially Sets the Release Date for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn)

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Ubuntu

Canonical has finally settled on a release date for the Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) and the previous, temporary date announced has been changed by a week.

Shortly after the launch of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Canonical started to work on the next version of Ubuntu, 14.10. This is quite normal and the development cycle for Ubuntu is about six months. Also, the version number of Ubuntu says that it has to arrive in October.

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Canonical and Mirantis Team Up on Enterprise OpenStack Support

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Server
Ubuntu

Mirantis and Canonical today announced a joint collaboration to offer private cloud solutions based on Mirantis OpenStack and Ubuntu. The two companies plan to invest in continuously testing compatibility between Mirantis OpenStack and Ubuntu to ensure that the Mirantis OpenStack distribution works seamlessly with Ubuntu. The companies will also collaborate to offer an OpenStack solution that is fully supported.

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Canonical, Microsoft, and Apple Want OS Convergence – Who Will Get There First?

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Ubuntu

Canonical, Microsoft, and Apple want the same thing from their operating systems, but they go about it in different ways. It's only possible to estimate for Canonical how long it will take them to achieve their goal because their product is open source, but it's much harder to do this for the other companies.

It's going to be a close race and it's difficult to anticipate who is going to win it.

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My Name is Brian and I Build Supercomputers in My Spare Time

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Linux
Server
Ubuntu

The NUCs run Ubuntu server and are storage hosts and the primary interface to the external world. The system has 8x Parallella boards and a shared gigabit Ethernet switch, giving a peak performance of around 208 GFLOPs.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Is Looking To Settle On The Linux 3.16 Kernel

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Ubuntu

The next Ubuntu Linux release, Ubuntu 14.10 "Utopic Unicorn" will likely be powered by the 3.16 kernel.

Given that Linux 3.15 is being released this week and Linux 3.16 should be christened around the end of July or early August, it makes sense that Canonical developers are focused on shipping the 3.16 kernel for Ubuntu 14.10. Ubuntu 14.10 has a feature freeze on 21 August, the final kernel freeze on 9 October, and the official release on 23 October.

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Canonical and Cavium Expand SoC Partnership for Ubuntu, OpenStack

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Ubuntu

Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux, is strengthening its ties to system-on-a-chip (SoC) manufacturer Cavium through expanded support for the ThunderX family, which could open new doors for Ubuntu and open source on ARM64 devices, OpenStack cloud servers and other enterprise hardware.

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ownCloud Desktop Client 2.2.4 Released with Updated Dolphin Plugin, Bug Fixes

ownCloud is still alive and kicking, and they've recently released a new maintenance update of the ownCloud Desktop Client, version 2.2.4, bringing some much-needed improvements and patching various annoying issues. Read more

Early Benchmarks Of The Linux 4.9 DRM-Next Radeon/AMDGPU Drivers

While Linux 4.9 will not officially open for development until next week, the DRM-Next code is ready to roll with all major feature work having been committed by the different open-source Direct Rendering Manager drivers. In this article is some preliminary testing of this DRM-Next code as of 29 September when testing various AMD GPUs with the Radeon and AMDGPU DRM drivers. Linux 4.9 does bring compile-time-offered experimental support for the AMD Southern Islands GCN 1.0 hardware on AMDGPU, but that isn't the focus of this article. A follow-up comparison is being done with GCN 1.0/1.1 experimental support enabled to see the Radeon vs. AMDGPU performance difference on that hardware. For today's testing was a Radeon R7 370 to look at the Radeon DRM performance and for AMDGPU testing was the Radeon R9 285, R9 Fury, and RX 480. Benchmarks were done from the Linux 4.8 Git and Linux DRM-Next kernels as of 29 September. Read more

How to Effectively and Efficiently Edit Configuration Files in Linux

Every Linux administrator has to eventually (and manually) edit a configuration file. Whether you are setting up a web server, configuring a service to connect to a database, tweaking a bash script, or troubleshooting a network connection, you cannot avoid a dive deep into the heart of one or more configuration files. To some, the prospect of manually editing configuration files is akin to a nightmare. Wading through what seems like countless lines of options and comments can put you on the fast track for hair and sanity loss. Which, of course, isn’t true. In fact, most Linux administrators enjoy a good debugging or configuration challenge. Sifting through the minutiae of how a server or software functions is a great way to pass time. But this process doesn’t have to be an exercise in ineffective inefficiency. In fact, tools are available to you that go a very long way to make the editing of config files much, much easier. I’m going to introduce you to a few such tools, to ease some of the burden of your Linux admin duties. I’ll first discuss the command-line tools that are invaluable to the task of making configuration more efficient. Read more

Why Good Linux Sysadmins Use Markdown

The Markdown markup language is perfect for writing system administrator documentation: it is lightweight, versatile, and easy to learn, so you spend your time writing instead of fighting with formatting. The life of a Linux system administrator is complex and varied, and you know that documenting your work is a big time-saver. A documentation web server shared by you and your colleagues is a wonderful productivity tool. Most of us know simple HTML, and can whack up a web page as easily as writing plain text. But using Markdown is better. Read more