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Leadwerks partners with Ubuntu for Linux games development

Filed under
Gaming
Ubuntu

The firms said they will make the Leadwerks Game Engine software development framework available in the Ubuntu Software Center to provide users of the operating system with a powerful tool for rapid game development under Ubuntu Linux.

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Cinnamon PPA will no longer be maintained for Ubuntu users

Filed under
Ubuntu

Gwendal Le Bihan, maintainer of the Cinnamon PPA, has confirmed he will be discontinuing the popular desktop environment. At least the stable releases the community has become accustomed to that is. The development of the Cinnamon desktop environment will continue through development builds in a separate nightly PPA.

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RhinoLINUX Lite Xfce Edition 7.0 Is Based on Xubuntu 13.10 and Linux Mint 16

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

RhinoLINUX 7.0 has been dubbed “Saucy SUZIE” and the code name betrays the roots of the distribution. The developers have used more than just one base for their operating system, namely Xubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) and Linux Mint 16 (Petra). This is rather unusual, especially if we take into consideration the fact that Ubuntu 13.10 is about to reach end of life in a couple of months.

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LightDM 1.11.2 Released for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn)

Filed under
Ubuntu

LightDM is a display manager that's mainly used in Ubuntu distributions, but users will find it in other Ubuntu-based distros as well. It's not a visible part of the operating system and it's not something that users interact with at any level.

The LightDM development has been going at a steady pace and its devs have just released a new version that is designed for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn). It doesn’t have too many changes, but there are a couple of interesting ones.

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Will Canonical name a new Pope?

Filed under
Ubuntu

So who should replace Jono?

My choice, and I hope it’s not el beso de la muerte (that’s the kiss of death, to those who don’t speak Spanish) for me to say it, is California LoCo leader Nathan Haines, who I’ve mentioned in an earlier blog post. Again, I have known Nathan for years and he has been an eloquent advocate and steady leader in the California LoCo for quite some time. There are few in FOSS for which I have as much respect as I do for Nathan, and his leadership skills are top-notch. If Canonical misses the chance to hire Nathan as their Community Leader, they should at least — at the ultimate very least — make him the Community Leader’s monkey boy.

But after thinking about it for awhile, my guess is that Jono’s successor will be Alan Pope, Canonical’s engineering manager, podcaster and all-around good guy. He may not be able to play electric guitar as well as Jono Bacon, but he has the right stuff — for example, a likeable demeanor and a knack for diplomacy for starters, and the same ability to perform the same foot-from-mouth extraction that Jono always performed on Shuttleworth. He would be a good fit for Ubuntu.

So the question becomes this: Are we going to see white smoke from the chimneys at Canonical if they elect Pope?

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Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn Now Uses Kernel 3.15 RC5

Filed under
Ubuntu

As you may know, the development of Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn has started a few weeks ago. For now, Ubuntu 14.10 is the same system as Ubuntu 14.04, but with some under-development additions.

While Ubuntu 14.10 was initially based on Kernel 3.13 (the kernel used on Ubuntu Trusty), the developers have recently implemented Kernel 3.15 RC5 to power up Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn.

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Updated Intel Graphics Stack On Ubuntu 14.04 Has Some Slowdowns

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

For those curious about the impact of running Intel "Haswell" HD Graphics 4600 on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and then pulling in the latest Mesa 10.3-devel code followed by the Linux 3.15 kernel, it's not entirely a happy story if you are looking to maximize your Intel Linux graphics performance capabilities.

Having done a clean install of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS this week on a Core i7 4770K system I figured I would do the usual graphics driver performance update of comparing Ubuntu 14.04 out-of-the-box (Linux 3.13 + Mesa 10.1) against pulling in the latest Oibaf PPA packages to have xf86-video-intel 2.99.911 DDX and the Mesa 10.3-devel Git master code (a big leap from Mesa 10.1.0). Lastly, with the updated Intel user-space graphics drivers I then updated kernel-space by moving to the Linux 3.15 kernel via the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA.

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Netrunner 14 RC1 Is Based on Kubuntu 14.04 LTS, but It Looks Much Better

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Netrunner 14 RC1, a GNU/Linux distribution based on Kubuntu 14.04 LTS, featuring KDE as the default desktop environment and integrating many GNOME/GTK+ programs to make it Ubuntu-compatible, has been released and is now available for testing.

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Mark Shuttleworth Says That Ubuntu Is Now the Biggest OS in the Cloud

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Canonical, has been very busy in the last couple of weeks promoting Ubuntu, but not the desktop version. It turns out that Ubuntu is a hit in the cloud ecosystem as well and that it dominates the OpenStack race.

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Catalyst On Ubuntu 14.04 Linux Competes Well With Windows 8.1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Microsoft
Ubuntu

After this week having carried out benchmarks showing Intel's Windows 8.1 OpenGL driver is outperforming their open-source Linux driver but NVIDIA's driver on Ubuntu Linux is commonly faster than Windows 8.1, the time has come to benchmark several different AMD Radeon graphics cards under Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Windows 8.1 Pro x64 with all available updates and each OS using the latest Catalyst 14.4 driver.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

  • iPhones are much more likely to 'fail' than Androids
    Apple's once glittering reputation for quality took quite a few hits during the last few years, especially when it comes to iOS, the software that runs on iPhones. In some cases, recurrent software bugs have plagued users with issues such as the inability to use Wi-Fi, frequent crashes, and ridiculously short battery life. This week reports surfaced about a hardware flaw that makes some iPhone 6 screens inoperable. (Apple hasn't confirmed any related problems.) It's hard to tell how widespread some of these issues are, but a new report from a company that monitors smartphone quality suggests iPhones are far more likely to "fail" or suffer serious glitches than Android phones. The Blancco Technology Group says it collected performance data from millions of mobile phones during the second quarter of 2016, and it found that iPhones had an overall failure rate of 58 percent, compared to just 35 percent failure for Android devices. The term "failure" doesn’t necessarily mean that the phone has become a brick, according to Blancco. Instead, it means the device or software running on the device suffered some serious problem.
  • Maru OS is now open source (Turns Android phones into Linux desktops)
    Maru OS is a software project that lets you plug an Android phone into an external display to run desktop Linux software. First unveiled earlier this year, the software is very much a work-in-progress. Initially it only supported one phone: the Google Nexus 5. But things could get a lot more interesting soon, because the developer behind Maru OS has finished open sourcing the project and a group of developers are planning to start porting the software to run on additional devices.
  • Maru OS wants to turn your phone into a desktop with its latest open source build
    Not to be confused with Maru the adorable YouTube cat, Maru OS, the bite-sized Android add-on that turns your phone into a desktop, just went open source. Maru OS doesn’t change much about the way your phone operates on its own, but once you connect a desktop monitor via a slimport cable, Maru really comes to life. When connected to a display, Maru OS allows you to run a desktop Linux environment straight from your phone. Your phone is still a phone, it’ll take calls, send texts and do everything else it normally does, even while it’s connected to a desktop monitor running Linux on the side. It’s an interesting concept, but it’s still very much a work in progress. Today’s announcement could help move things along for Maru.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Oracle reveals Java Applet API deprecation plan
    Oracle has revealed its interim plan to help Java devs deal with browser-makers' imminent banishment of plug-ins. Years of bugs in Java, Flash and other plugins have led browser-makers to give up on plugins. Apple recently decided that its Safari browser will just pretend Java, Flash and Silverlight aren't installed. Google has announced it will soon just not run any Flash content in its Chrome browser. Oracle saw this movement coming and in January 2016 announced it would “deprecate the Java browser plugin in JDK 9”
  • Marist College, Rockefeller Archive Center Partner on Open Source Digital Archival Tech
    Marist College and the Rockefeller Archive Center (RAC) in New York have partnered to develop and implement an open source digital records management system to support researchers, archival staff and the broader archival community. [...] At the same time, one of the goals of Marist College "is to offer open source technologies, such as Liferay and Blockchain, to like-minded organizations that create a lasting impact on our community," said Bill Thirsk, vice president of information technology and CIO at the college, in a news release.
  • Facebook is scrambling to catch up to Google in open-sourcing AI code
    In artificial intelligence research, free code garners goodwill from the community, talent, and bragging rights. So it’s no surprise that many of the companies investing in AI, like Facebook and Google, are racing to make their code open source early and often.
  • Open Source AI is On Fire, and Facebook Has the Latest Contributions
    In the latest move, Facebook is open sourcing three tools that the company uses internally for machine vision.
  • New Open Source Milestones for Microsoft [Ed: Puff pieces distracting from patent attacks on Linux]
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: August 26th
  • The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Stefano Zacchiroli of Software Heritage
    Software Heritage is a recently announced non-profit initiative to archive, organize, and share all publicly available software source code. Stefano Zacchiroli is a co-founder and current CTO of the Software Heritage project. He is a Board Director of the Open Source Initiative, member of FSF's High Priority Projects committee, and former 3-times Debian Project Leader.
  • Uganda to cut costs with open source software
    Some of the FOSS customizable applications on the market include Word Press, Mozilla Firefox, and open office among others. The applications can be used to create websites, marketing business ideas, and conduct online business. Most startups find it difficult to break through but creation of an online presence has made some business gain faster traction. James Saaka, the NITA-U executive director, said government struggles to pay licenses to use programmes from Microsoft, Oracle which is so expensive to maintain.
  • Preserving languages and cultures in India: The birth of the Tulu Wikipedia
    After eight years of effort and outreach, the Tulu language Wikipedia has gone live. Wikimedia contributors play a key role in preserving languages and cultures, and tools like the Wikimedia Incubator help new projects like the Tulu Wikipedia get started. Tulu is a language spoken by three to five million people in the states of Karnataka and Kerala in the southwest and south India respectively, and by some people in the US and in Gulf countries. Tulu Wikipedia is the 294th Wikipedia and the 23rd South Asian language Wikipedia. The Tulu Wikipedia grew in the Wikimedia Incubator for about eight years before going online. So far, 198 editors have contributed 1285 articles, and the active editors that have more than 5 edits per month in the project number between 5-10 on average.

Having offended everyone else in the world, Linus Torvalds calls own lawyers a 'nasty festering disease'

Coding curmudgeon Linus Torvalds has gone off on yet another rant: this time against his own lawyers and free software activist Bradley Kuhn. On a mailing list about an upcoming Linux conference, a discussion about whether to include a session on the GPL that protects the open source operating system quickly devolved in an angry rant as its founder piled in. Read more